Publications by authors named "T Shchetynska-Marinova"

11 Publications

Recurrence of atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation in dependence of arterial stiffness.

Neth Heart J 2021 Nov 24. Epub 2021 Nov 24.

First Department of Medicine-Cardiology, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.

Background: Arterial stiffness (AS) has emerged as a strong predictor of cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Although increased AS has been described as a predictor of atrial fibrillation (AF), its role as a risk marker for AF recurrence has not yet been elucidated.

Methods: Patients with AF who underwent pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) were included in this study. Presence of AS was evaluated by measuring aortic distensibility (AD) of the descending aorta by transoesophageal echocardiography.

Results: In total, 151 patients (mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 71.9 ± 9.8 years) were enrolled and followed for a median duration of 21 months (interquartile range 15.0-31.0). During follow-up, AF recurred in 94 (62.3%) patients. AF recurrence was seen more frequently in patients with permanent AF (27% vs 46%, p = 0.03) and in those who had undergone prior PVI (9% vs 23%, p = 0.02). AD was significantly reduced in patients with AF recurrence (mean ± SD 2.6 ± 2.3 vs 1.5 ± 0.7 × 10 mm Hg, p < 0.0001), as well as left atrial volume index (LAVI) (mean ± SD 29 ± 12 vs 44 ± 15 ml/m, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed LAVI (odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.4) and AS (OR 3.6, 95% CI 2.8-4.1) as independent risk factors of AF recurrence.

Conclusion: Increased AS and left atrial size were independent predictors of AF recurrence after PVI. AD as surrogate marker of AS seemed to reflect the overall CV risk. In addition, AD was significantly correlated with left atrial size, which suggests that increased AS leads to atrial remodelling and thus to AF recurrence.

Trial Registration: German registry for clinical studies (DRKS), DRKS00019007.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12471-021-01644-wDOI Listing
November 2021

First experiences of local pulse wave velocity measurements in 4D-MRI in focally stented femoropopliteal arteries.

Vasa 2021 Nov 16;50(6):468-474. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

First Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg and DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research) partner site Heidelberg/Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.

In peripheral arterial disease (PAD) the femoropopliteal (FP) artery is the most frequently recanalized lower limb artery. Stent-based interventions change the biomechanical properties of FP arteries. However, no clinical tool for functional imaging is established for quantitative measurements in vivo. Four-dimensional-flow magnetic resonance imaging enables a detailed evaluation of the hemodynamics of the central and - more challenging - the peripheral arteries. The present study aimed to determine the feasibility of assessing pulse wave velocities (PWV) as a marker of vessel stiffness in PAD patients with multiple spot stents and to compare the values with age-matched subjects and young-adult healthy subjects. Contrast-free 4D-flow MRI was performed in seven PAD patients with focally stented FP arteries, five age-matched subjects after exclusion of PAD, and five young, healthy adults. PWV values were calculated from flow curves by using the foot-to-foot method. Four-D-flow MRI sequences offering high spatial and temporal resolution enables quantification of flow velocity measurements and estimation of PWVs. Assessment of segmental PWV as a surrogate of vascular stiffness in focally stented femoral arteries is feasible. PWV values across all groups were 15.6±5.2 m/s, 13.3±4.1 m/s, and 9.9±2.2 m/s in PAD patients, senior-aged volunteers, and young-adult volunteers respectively. PWV values in PAD patients were similar with those in the senior-aged volunteers group (15.6±5.2 vs. 13.3 ±4.1 years, p=0.43). However, when compared to the young-adult volunteers, PAD patients had a statistically significantly higher mean local PWV (15.6±5.2 m/s vs. 9.9±2.2 m/s, p<0.05). Calculating segmental PWV in the femoral arteries is feasible in PAD patients with focally stented FP arteries. PWV values in PAD patients were similar to those in senior-aged volunteers, both of which were higher than in young-adult volunteers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0301-1526/a000965DOI Listing
November 2021

Determinants of arterial stiffness in patients with atrial fibrillation.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2021 Aug-Sep;114(8-9):550-560. Epub 2021 Apr 23.

First department of medicine (cardiology), University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, European Centre for AngioScience (ECAS), 68167 Mannheim, Germany; DZHK (German centre for cardiovascular research) Partner Site Heidelberg/Mannheim, 68167 Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address:

Background: Arterial stiffness has emerged as a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease, end-organ damage and all-cause mortality. Although increased arterial stiffness has been described as a predictor of atrial fibrillation, the relationship between arterial stiffness and atrial fibrillation is uncertain.

Aim: We assessed arterial stiffness in patients with atrial fibrillation compared with that in a control group.

Methods: We enrolled 151 patients with atrial fibrillation who underwent pulmonary vein isolation (mean age 71.1±9.8 years) and 54 control patients with similar cardiovascular risk profiles and sinus rhythm, matched for age (mean age 68.6±15.7 years) and sex. Aortic distensibility as a measure of arterial stiffness was assessed by transoesophageal echocardiography. Patients with atrial fibrillation were followed over a median of 21 (15 to 31) months.

Results: Compared with control patients, patients with atrial fibrillation had significantly lower aortic distensibility (1.8±1.1 vs. 2.1±1.1 10mmHg; P=0.02). Age (hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.003 to 0.03; P=0.02) and pulse pressure (hazard ratio -1.35, 95% confidence interval -0.07 to -0.03; P<0.0001) were the strongest predictors of decreased aortic distensibility in the study cohort. This effect was independent of the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal/persistent). During follow-up, decreased aortic distensibility was a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause hospitalizations, as well as recurrences of atrial fibrillation, with a higher incidence rate of events in patients in the lowest aortic distensibility quartile (P=0.001).

Conclusions: Aortic distensibility was significantly reduced in patients with atrial fibrillation, with age and pulse pressure showing the strongest correlation, independent of the type of atrial fibrillation. Additionally, decreased aortic distensibility was associated with cardiovascular and all-cause hospitalizations, as well as recurrences of atrial fibrillation, which showed a quartile-dependent occurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2020.12.009DOI Listing
October 2021

Aortitis - An Interdisciplinary Challenge.

In Vivo 2021 Jan-Feb;35(1):41-52

First Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany;

The term 'aortitis' comprises a heterogeneous spectrum of diseases, with varied etiology and clinical presentations, whose common characteristic is the inflammation of the aortic wall. Since aortitis can mimic almost all common cardiovascular disorders, its clinical recognition remains a challenge. Some cases of aortitis remain undetected for a long time and may be diagnosed after severe life-threatening complications have already arisen. The diagnosis of aortitis is based on the presence of homogeneous circumferential thickening of the aortic wall detected on aortic imaging, or typical histological features in combination with clinical findings and laboratory parameters. Management of aortitis is usually conservative (immunosuppressive drugs in noninfectious aortitis; antimicrobial drugs in infectious). However, if vascular complications such as aortic aneurysm, rupture, or steno-occlusive events appear, aortic surgery or endovascular therapy may be required. This review article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the aorta to promote better clinical management of these entities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21873/invivo.12230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7880770PMC
June 2021

Arterial Stiffness Is Associated With Increased Symptom Burden in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

Can J Cardiol 2020 12 3;36(12):1949-1955. Epub 2020 Sep 3.

First Department of Medicine - Cardiology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research) partner site Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address:

Background: Increased arterial stiffness (AS) has been described as a predictor of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study was performed to assess whether increased AS leads to a higher symptom burden in patients with AF.

Methods: One hundred sixty-two consecutive patients (104 male, 58 female) with diagnosed AF (paroxysmal or persistent) were enrolled. Symptoms most likely attributable to AF were quantified according to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Severity of Atrial Fibrillation (SAF) scale. AS indices (aortic distensibility, cyclic circumferential strain, and aortic compliance) were characterized using transoesophageal echocardiography.

Results: The cohort was divided into asymptomatic to oligosymptomatic (SAF scale 0-1, n = 78 [48.1%]) and symptomatic (SAF scale ≥ 2, n = 84 [51.9%]) patients. Symptomatic patients tended to be younger (median, 75 [interquartile range (IQR) 67-80] vs 71 [65-79]; P = 0.047) and were more likely to be female (22 [28.2%] vs 36 [42.9%]; P = 0.052). Hypertension was more frequent in symptomatic patients. Aortic compliance indices each were reduced in symptomatic patients, most pronounced for aortic compliance (median, 0.05 [IQR 0.03-0.06] vs 0.04 [0.03-0.05] cm/mm Hg; P = 0.01) followed by cyclic circumferential strain (median, 0.09 [IQR 0.07-0.11] vs 0.07 [0.04-0.10]; P = 0.02) and aortic distensibility (10 mm Hg, median, 1.74 [IQR 1.34-2.24] vs 1.54 [1.12-2.08]; P = 0.03). Multivariable analysis revealed aortic compliance as an independent predictor for symptoms in patients with AF with an odds ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.4; P = 0.003).

Conclusions: AS contributes to a high symptom burden in patients with AF, emphasizing the prognostic role of AS in the early detection and prevention in patients with AF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2020.08.022DOI Listing
December 2020
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