Publications by authors named "T Rinda Soong"

190 Publications

PolyG-DS: An ultrasensitive polyguanine tract-profiling method to detect clonal expansions and trace cell lineage.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2021 Aug;118(31)

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195;

Polyguanine tracts (PolyGs) are short guanine homopolymer repeats that are prone to accumulating mutations when cells divide. This feature makes them especially suitable for cell lineage tracing, which has been exploited to detect and characterize precancerous and cancerous somatic evolution. PolyG genotyping, however, is challenging because of the inherent biochemical difficulties in amplifying and sequencing repetitive regions. To overcome this limitation, we developed PolyG-DS, a next-generation sequencing (NGS) method that combines the error-correction capabilities of duplex sequencing (DS) with enrichment of PolyG loci using CRISPR-Cas9-targeted genomic fragmentation. PolyG-DS markedly reduces technical artifacts by comparing the sequences derived from the complementary strands of each original DNA molecule. We demonstrate that PolyG-DS genotyping is accurate, reproducible, and highly sensitive, enabling the detection of low-frequency alleles (<0.01) in spike-in samples using a panel of only 19 PolyG markers. PolyG-DS replicated prior results based on PolyG fragment length analysis by capillary electrophoresis, and exhibited higher sensitivity for identifying clonal expansions in the nondysplastic colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. We illustrate the utility of this method for resolving the phylogenetic relationship among precancerous lesions in ulcerative colitis and for tracing the metastatic dissemination of ovarian cancer. PolyG-DS enables the study of tumor evolution without prior knowledge of tumor driver mutations and provides a tool to perform cost-effective and easily scalable ultra-accurate NGS-based PolyG genotyping for multiple applications in biology, genetics, and cancer research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2023373118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8346827PMC
August 2021

Correlation of Body Mass Index with Oncologic Outcomes in Colorectal Cancer Patients: A Large Population-Based Study.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Jul 17;13(14). Epub 2021 Jul 17.

Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan 71004, Taiwan.

It has been acknowledged that excess body weight increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, there is little evidence on the impact of body mass index (BMI) on CRC patients' long-term oncologic results in Asian populations. We studied the influence of BMI on overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and CRC-specific survival rates in CRC patients from the administrative claims datasets of Taiwan using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves and the log-rank test to estimate the statistical differences among BMI groups. Underweight patients (<18.50 kg/m) presented higher mortality (56.40%) and recurrence (5.34%) rates. Besides this, they had worse OS (aHR:1.61; 95% CI: 1.53-1.70; -value: < 0.0001) and CRC-specific survival (aHR:1.52; 95% CI: 1.43-1.62; -value: < 0.0001) rates compared with those of normal weight patients (18.50-24.99 kg/m). On the contrary, CRC patients belonging to the overweight (25.00-29.99 kg/m), class I obesity (30.00-34.99 kg/m), and class II obesity (≥35.00 kg/m) categories had better OS, DFS, and CRC-specific survival rates in the analysis than the patients in the normal weight category. Overweight patients consistently had the lowest mortality rate after a CRC diagnosis. The associations with being underweight may reflect a reverse causation. CRC patients should maintain a long-term healthy body weight.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13143592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8307410PMC
July 2021

A 'Concentrate-&-Destroy' technology for enhanced removal and destruction of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in municipal landfill leachate.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Oct 29;791:148124. Epub 2021 May 29.

CTI and Associates, Inc., 28001 Cabot Dr #250, Novi, MI 48377, USA.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are ubiquitous in landfill leachate due to their widespread applications in various industrial and consumer products. Yet, there has been no cost-effective technology available for treating PFAS in leachate because of the intrinsic persistency of PFAS and the high matrix strength of landfill leachate. We tested a two-step 'Concentrate-&-Destroy' technology for treating over 14 PFAS from a model landfill leachate through bench- and pilot-scale experiments. The technology was based on an adsorptive photocatalyst (Fe/[email protected]), which was able to selectively adsorb PFAS despite the strong matrix effect of the leachate. Moreover, the pre-concentrated PFAS on Fe/[email protected] were effectively degraded under UV, which also regenerates the material. The presence of 0.5 M HO during the photocatalytic degradation enhanced the solid-phase destruction of the PFAS. Fresh Fe/[email protected] at a dosage of 10 g/L removed >95% of 13 PFAS from the leachate, 86% after first regeneration, and 74% when reused three times. Fe/[email protected] was less effective for PFBA and PFPeA partially due to the transformation of precursors and/or longer-chain homologues into these short-chain PFAS. Pilot-scale tests preliminarily confirmed the bench-scale results. Despite the strong interference from additional suspended solids, Fe/[email protected] removed >92% of 18 PFAS in 8 h under the field conditions, and when the PFAS-laden solids were subjected to the UV-HO system, ~84% of 16 PFAS in the solid phase were degraded. The 'Concentrate-&-Destroy' strategy appears promising for more cost-effective removal and degradation of PFAS in landfill leachate or PFAS-laden high-strength wastewaters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.148124DOI Listing
October 2021

[Nutrition Demand and Care of Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery].

Hu Li Za Zhi 2021 Jun;68(3):21-25

MS, Dietitians, Department of Weight Loss & Health Management Center, E-DA Dachang Hospital, Taiwan, ROC.

The increasing prevalence of obesity and comorbid conditions worldwide requires the development of effective strategies for both treatment and prevention. In recent years, bariatric surgery has emerged as the most effective weight-loss therapy for individuals affected by moderate and morbid obesity. Behavioral alterations in eating patterns and anatomical and physiological modifications to the gastrointestinal organs may result in significant deficiencies in protein and micronutrients such as iron, folate, Vitamin B12, and thiamin. Many individuals with obesity have already-existing nutritional deficiencies before receiving bariatric procedures. The preoperative screening for and correction of micronutrient deficiencies preoperatively are crucial, as these deficiencies may be further exacerbated by the bariatric procedures. Because a balanced diet is key to successful weight loss at all stages of treatment, after the operation, patients should consume a diet that is low calorie and rich in protein, choose foods of the proper volume and consistency, and drink an appropriate amount of fluids. Maintaining a proper diet will enable patients to avoid unpleasant sensations after surgery and improve the phenomenon of inadequate nutritional needs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6224/JN.202106_68(3).04DOI Listing
June 2021

Long-Term Efficacy of Bariatric Surgery for the Treatment of Super-Obesity: Comparison of SG, RYGB, and OAGB.

Obes Surg 2021 08 16;31(8):3391-3399. Epub 2021 May 16.

Department of Surgery, Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Background: The most appropriate procedure for the treatment of super obesity (BMI > 50 kg/m) is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the safety, long-term (> 5 years) weight loss, and adverse events between three commonly performed procedures, sleeve gastrectomy (SG), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) in super-obese patients.

Methods: Between January 2002 and December 2015, 498 successive patients with super morbid obesity (BMI > 50), who underwent SG or RYGB or OAGB, were recruited. Surgical outcome, weight loss, resolution of co-morbidities, and late complications were followed and compared between the 3 groups. All data derived from a prospective bariatric database and a retrospective analysis was conducted.

Results: The average patient age was 32.1 ± 10.4 years, with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 56.0 ± 6.7 kg/m. Of them, 190 (38.9%) underwent SG, 62 (12.4%) RYGB, and 246 (49.4%) OAGB. There was no difference in basic characters between the 3 groups except SG had fewer diabetic patients. RYGB group had higher intraoperative blood loss, longer operating time, and hospital stay than the other 2 groups. RYGB had a higher 30-days post-operative major complication rate (4.8%) than SG (0.5%) and OAGB (0.8%). The follow-up rate at 1 and 5 years was 89.4% and 52.0%. At post-operative 5 years, OAGB had a higher total weight loss (40.8%) than SG (35.1%), but not RYGB (37.2%). SG had a lower remission rate in dyslipidemia comparing to OAGB and RYGB, but T2DM remission rate was no different between the groups. The overall revision rate is 5.4% (27/498) of the whole group, and SG had a lower revision rate (2.6%) than RYGB (8.1%) and OAGB (6.9%).

Conclusion: SG is an effective and durable primary bariatric procedure for the treatment of super obesity and metabolic disorders. OAGB had a similar operation risk to SG but resulted in a better weight loss than SG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-021-05464-0DOI Listing
August 2021
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