Publications by authors named "T A Mattsson"

95 Publications

The Quest for a Divided Welfare State: Sweden in the Era of Privatization, written by John Lapidus.

Authors:
Titti Mattsson

Eur J Health Law 2020 Sep 10;27(5):513-517. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Professor of Public Law, Faculty of Law, Lund University Lund Sweden Director, Health Law Research Centre.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15718093-BJA10027DOI Listing
September 2020

End-of-life anticancer treatment - a nationwide registry-based study of trends in the use of chemo-, endocrine, immune-, and targeted therapies.

Acta Oncol 2021 Aug 2;60(8):961-967. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

OPEN - Open Patient data Explorative Network, Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, and Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.

Background: Anticancer treatments near the end of a patient's life should generally be avoided, as it leaves the patient with no significant anticancer effect but increases the risk of severe side effects. We described the pattern of all end-of-life anticancer treatment in a population of Danish cancer patients.

Methods: Using the Danish national health registries, we identified all patients deceased due to cancer 2010-2015. Anticancer treatment registered in the last 30 days of life was categorized as end-of-life treatment. Predictors of such treatment were investigated using logistic regression models.

Results: We identified 42,277 patients (median age 70 years) of whom 16% received end-of-life anticancer treatment. This proportion did not change during the study period ( = .09). Chemotherapy alone was the most frequent treatment, accounting for 78% of all end-of-life treatment in 2010, decreasing to 71% in 2015. In contrast, end-of-life use of immunotherapy, targeted therapy and endocrine therapy increased during the study period. Breast cancer as index cancer was associated with the highest frequency of end-of-life treatment (23%), followed by malignant melanoma (21%), and prostate cancer (18%). Factors associated with lower odds for end-of-life treatment were female sex, older age, high burden of comorbidity, and being diagnosed >6 months prior to death.

Conclusions: We found a stable overall rate at 16% of patients receiving anticancer treatment within one month prior to death in this nationwide sample of cancer deaths. Further research is needed to assess whether this level of end-of-life treatment is justified or reflects inappropriate use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2021.1890332DOI Listing
August 2021

Wettability of cellulose surfaces under the influence of an external electric field.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2021 May 6;589:347-355. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Division of Forest Products and Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemigården 4, 412 96 Göteborg, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10044, Sweden. Electronic address:

Hypothesis: Interfacial tensions play an important role in dewatering of hydrophilic materials like nanofibrillated cellulose, and are affected by the molecular organization of water at the interface. Application of an electric field influences the orientation of water molecules along the field direction. Hence, it should be possible to alter the interfacial free energies to tune the wettability of cellulose surface through application of an external electric field thus, aiding the dewatering process.

Simulations: Molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose surface in contact with water under the influence of an external electric field have been conducted with GLYCAM-06 forcefield. The effect of variation in electric field intensity and directions on the spreading coefficient has been addressed via orientational preference of water molecules and interfacial free energy analyses.

Findings: The application of electric field influences the interfacial free energy difference at the cellulose-water interface. The spreading coefficient increases with the electric field directed parallel to the cellulose-water interface while it decreases in the perpendicular electric field. Variation in interfacial free energies seems to explain the change in contact angle adequately in presence of an electric field. The wettability of cellulose surface can be tuned by the application of an external electric field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2021.01.003DOI Listing
May 2021

Quantifying Charge Effects on Fouling Layer Strength and (Ir)Removability during Cross-Flow Microfiltration.

Membranes (Basel) 2021 Jan 1;11(1). Epub 2021 Jan 1.

Department of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.

Fouling of membranes is still an important limiting factor in the application of membrane technology. Therefore, there is still a need for an in-depth understanding of which parameters affect the (ir)removability of fouling layers, as well as the mechanisms behind fouling. In this study, fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) was used to investigate the influence of charge effects between negatively charged foulant particles and cations on cake cohesive strength. Fouling cakes' thicknesses and cohesive strengths were estimated during membrane operations, where microfiltration (MF) membranes were fouled in a feed-and-bleed cross-flow filtration system with low and highly negatively charged polystyrene-polyacrylic acid core-shell particles. In addition, an added procedure to determine the irremovability of cakes using FDG was also proposed. Comparing layers formed in the presence and absence of calcium ions revealed that layers formed without calcium ions had significantly lower cohesive strength than layers formed in the presence of calcium ions, which is explained by the bridging effect between negatively charged particles and calcium ions. Results also confirmed more cohesive cakes formed by high negative charge particles in the presence of calcium compared to lower negative charge particles. Hence, it was demonstrated that FDG can be used to assess the cohesive strength ((ir)removability) of cake layers, and to study how cake cohesive strength depends on foulant surface charge and ionic composition of the solution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/membranes11010028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7824541PMC
January 2021

Drainage for forestry increases N, P and TOC export to boreal surface waters.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Mar 16;762:144098. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Natural Resources Institute Finland, Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland.

More reliable assessments of nutrient export to surface waters and the Baltic Sea are required to achieve good ecological status of all water bodies. Previous nutrient export estimates have recently been questioned since they did not include the long-term impacts of drainage for forestry. We made new estimates of the total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P) and total organic carbon (TOC) export from forests to surface waters at different spatial scales in Finland. This was done by formulating statistical equations between streamwater concentrations and climate, soil, forest management and runoff variables and spatial data on catchment characteristics. The equations were based on a large, long-term runoff and streamwater quality dataset, which was collected from 28 pristine and 61 managed boreal forest catchments located around Finland. We found that the concentrations increased with temperature sum (TS), i.e. from north to south. Nitrogen, P and TOC concentrations increased with the proportion of drained areas in the catchment; those of N and TOC also increased with the proportion of peatlands. In contrast, with the increasing concentrations of N and TOC with time, P concentrations showed a decreasing trend over the last few decades. According to our estimates, altogether 47,300 Mg of N, 1780 Mg of P and 1814 Gg of TOC is transported from forest areas to surface waters in Finland. Forest management contributes 17% of the N export, 35% of the P export and 12% of the TOC export. Our new forest management export estimates for N and P are more than two times higher than the old estimates used by the environment authorities. The differences may be explained by the long-term impact of forest drainage. The spatial results indicate that peatland forests are hotspots for N, P and TOC export, especially in the river basins draining to the Gulf of Bothnia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144098DOI Listing
March 2021
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