Publications by authors named "T A Bensend"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pathogenic FBN1 variants in familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

Clin Genet 2016 06 20;89(6):719-23. Epub 2016 Jan 20.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Houston, TX, USA.

Marfan syndrome (MFS) due to mutations in FBN1 is a known cause of thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAAD) associated with pleiotropic manifestations. Genetic predisposition to TAAD can also be inherited in families in the absence of syndromic features, termed familial TAAD (FTAAD), and several causative genes have been identified to date. FBN1 mutations can also be identified in FTAAD families, but the frequency of these mutations has not been established. We performed exome sequencing of 183 FTAAD families and identified pathogenic FBN1 variants in five (2.7%) of these families. We also identified eight additional FBN1 rare variants that could not be unequivocally classified as disease-causing in six families. FBN1 sequencing should be considered in individuals with FTAAD even without significant systemic features of MFS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cge.12702DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4873375PMC
June 2016

Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated With ACTA2 Mutations.

Circ Cardiovasc Genet 2015 Jun 10;8(3):457-64. Epub 2015 Mar 10.

Departments of Internal Medicine (E.S.R., D.G., S.P., T.A.B., K.F., D.M.M.), Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (A.E., H.S.), University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, CA (D.L.); Connective Tissue Gene Tests, Allentown, PA (J.H.); Department of Cardiac and Vascular Sciences, St. George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom (A.C., G.A.); AP-HP, Hôpital Bichat, Centre National de Référence pour le syndrome de Marfan et apparentés, Paris, France (C.B., G.J.), Université Paris 7, Paris, France (C.B., G.J.), AP-HP, Hôpital Bichat, Laboratoire de Génétique moléculaire, Boulogne, France (C.B.), and INSERM, U1148, Paris, France (C.B., G.J.); AP-HP, Hôpital Bichat, Service de Cardiologie, Paris, France (G.J.); Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (A.B.); Genomic Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, OH (R.M.); Department of Bioscience and Genetics, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka, Japan (T.M., H.M.); Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (R.P.); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (J.C., S.L.); and Texas Heart Institute and Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center, Houston (J.C., S.L.).

Background: ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations.

Methods And Results: Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years versus 36 years). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta, and aortic arch. Overall, cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.86). After adjustment for intrafamilial correlation, sex and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared with other mutations.

Conclusions: ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.114.000943DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4601641PMC
June 2015

Coagulation factor V(A2440G) causes east Texas bleeding disorder via TFPIα.

J Clin Invest 2013 Sep 27;123(9):3777-87. Epub 2013 Aug 27.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Genetics, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

The autosomal dominantly inherited east Texas bleeding disorder is linked to an A2440G variant in exon 13 of the F5 gene. Affected individuals have normal levels of coagulation factor V (FV) activity, but demonstrate inhibition of global coagulation tests. We demonstrated that the A2440G mutation causes upregulation of an alternatively spliced F5 transcript that results in an in-frame deletion of 702 amino acids of the large activation fragment, the B domain. The approximately 250-kDa FV isoform (FV-short), which can be fully activated by thrombin, is present in all A2440G carriers' plasma (n = 16). FV-short inhibits coagulation through an indirect mechanism by forming a complex with tissue factor pathway inhibitor-α (TFPIα), resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in plasma TFPIα, suggesting that the TFPIα:FV-short complexes are retained in circulation. The TFPIα:FV-short complexes efficiently inhibit thrombin generation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. These data demonstrate that the east Texas bleeding disorder-associated F5(A2440G) leads to the formation of the TFPIα:FV-short complex, which inhibits activation and propagation of coagulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI69091DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3754264PMC
September 2013

What's the harm? Genetic counselor perceptions of adverse effects of genetics service provision by non-genetics professionals.

J Genet Couns 2014 Feb 12;23(1):48-63. Epub 2013 Jun 12.

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin St., MSB 6.100, Houston, TX, 77030, USA,

Anecdotal accounts suggest some patients have experienced negative outcomes as a result of receiving genetics services from non-genetics providers, but empirical evidence of these incidents and their outcomes is limited. This study examined genetic counselors' perceptions of the occurrence of such incidents in the state of Minnesota. Twenty-five genetic counselors completed an on-line survey and 20 also participated in a semi-structured telephone interview. The interviewees recalled and described 37 specific incidents they perceived as having negative outcomes for patients and/or their families. Inductive and cross-case analysis revealed common themes including: adverse psychosocial effects, inadequate genetic counseling, genetic testing and screening errors, medical mismanagement, negative shifts in attitudes toward medical providers, and unnecessary use of health care resources. Commonly mentioned strategies for preventing/mitigating negative outcomes included: educational outreach and awareness programs for medical providers and the general public, standardized testing and screening processes, and implementing mechanisms for reporting and addressing adverse events. Additional findings, practice and policy implications, and research recommendations are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-013-9605-3DOI Listing
February 2014

Genetic risk assessment for women with epithelial ovarian cancer: referral patterns and outcomes in a university gynecologic oncology clinic.

J Genet Couns 2013 Oct 16;22(5):662-73. Epub 2013 May 16.

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Little is known about genetic service utilization and ovarian cancer. We identified the frequency and outcome of genetic counseling referral, predictors of referral, and referral uptake for ovarian cancer patients. Using pathology reports, we identified all epithelial ovarian cancer patients seen in a university gynecologic oncology clinic (1/04-8/06). Electronic medical records (EMR) were used to document genetic service referral, time from diagnosis-to-referral, point-in-treatment at referral, personal/family cancer history, demographics, and genetic test results. Groups were compared using chi-squared and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. The study population consisted of 376 women with ovarian cancer, 72 (19 %) of who were referred for genetic counseling/testing, primarily during surveillance. Of those referred, 42 (58 %) had personal or family genetic counseling and 34 (47 %) were ultimately tested or identified due to known family mutation. Family history and prior cancer were associated with referral. Family history, living in a larger community, higher-stage disease, and serous histology were associated with undergoing genetic counseling. Risk assessment identified 20 BRCA1/2 (5.3 %) and 1 HNPCC (0.3 %) mutation carriers. Based on recent estimates that 11.7-16.6 % of women with ovarian cancer are BRCA carriers and 2 % are HNPCC carriers, results suggest under-identification of carriers and under-utilization of genetic services by providers and patients. Interventions to increase medical providers' referrals, even in a specialized oncology clinic, are necessary and may include innovations in educating these providers using web-based methods. Ease of referral by the introduction of an electronic cancer genetic referral form represents another new direction that may increase genetic risk assessment for high-risk women with ovarian cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-013-9598-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4589274PMC
October 2013
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