Publications by authors named "Syed M M Aarif"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Median raphe cyst of the penis: a case report and review of the literature.

J Med Case Rep 2019 Jul 14;13(1):214. Epub 2019 Jul 14.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University, Maharajgunj, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Background: A defect in embryological development or closure of median raphe may lead to formation of cyst(s) anywhere in the midline from glans to anus. These cysts are referred to as median raphe cysts, an uncommonly encountered clinical condition. The cyst is generally solitary, with the penile shaft being the most common location, with average size of around 1 cm. The diagnosis is mostly clinical and confirmed histologically. We report a case of a patient with a rare histological variant of median raphe cyst and provide a focused review on presentation, histopathology, and management.

Case Presentation: A 29-year-old unmarried Nepali man presented to our clinic with an asymptomatic, solitary, soft, translucent, nontender cystic lesion of about 1-cm diameter at the ventral aspect of glans penis, close to the meatus, that had been noticed at the age of 3 and was nonprogressive for the past 15 years. Ultrasonography demonstrated an isoechoic cystic lesion at the tip of the penis, separated from the urethra, and lying entirely within the mucosa without any evidence of solid component, septation, or vascularity. On the basis of clinical and ultrasonographic findings, a diagnosis of median raphe cyst of the penis was made. The cyst was excised with the patient under local anesthesia, and there was no evidence of recurrence in 2 years of follow-up. The histopathological examination with Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed the cyst wall was lined partly by ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium and partly by columnar epithelium with apical mucin.

Conclusions: Median raphe cyst is an uncommon, mostly asymptomatic condition in young patients. The cyst may occur anywhere along the midline from glans to anus. The diagnosis is clinical with histological confirmation. Excision is the treatment of choice with minimal chance of recurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-019-2133-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6626626PMC
July 2019

Idiopathic calcinosis cutis of the scrotum: a case report and review of the literature.

J Med Case Rep 2018 Dec 12;12(1):366. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University, Maharajgunj, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Background: Abnormal deposition of calcium in the skin or subcutaneous tissue is termed calcinosis cutis. Idiopathic calcinosis cutis of the scrotum is an uncommon entity. The pathogenesis of idiopathic calcinosis cutis of the scrotum is debatable. The condition presents as several brown to yellowish nodules on the scrotum, gradually progressive, and mostly asymptomatic. Here we report a case of idiopathic calcinosis cutis of the scrotum with a brief review of the literature and a discussion on pathogenesis.

Case Presentation: A healthy looking, 50-year-old Nepali man presented with multiple growths on his scrotum for 15 years, which were mostly asymptomatic with an occasional complaint of itching. On physical examination, multiple pink to brown nodules ranging in size from 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm to 3 × 3 × 1 cm, which were painless and firm in consistency, were noted. On laboratory examinations the following were found to be within normal limits: serum calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D hormone levels; uric acid; alkaline phosphatase; and lipid profile. Based on clinical features and laboratory reports, a diagnosis of idiopathic calcinosis cutis of the scrotum was made. The nodules were excised under local anesthesia in several sittings, which gave a good cosmetic result with no evidence of recurrence in 1-year follow-up period. A histopathological examination revealed dermis with areas of fibrosis and calcification along with numerous multinucleated giant cells and an absence of any cystic structure.

Conclusions: Idiopathic calcinosis cutis of the scrotum is a benign condition, which remains mostly asymptomatic. It presents as progressive multiple nodules of varying numbers and sizes. A histopathological evaluation reveals areas of calcification. The cause is either dystrophic calcification of cysts or idiopathic. Excision is the treatment of choice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-018-1922-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290501PMC
December 2018

Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome presenting as umbilical hernia in an Indian child.

Australas Med J 2014 28;7(2):51-7. Epub 2014 Feb 28.

Department of General Surgery, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, MH 413736, India.

Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (S-G) is a rare connective tissue disorder characterised by craniosynostosis, craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal, cardiovascular, neurological, and other abnormalities. We herein present a case of a five-year-old Indian child who presented to our clinic with reducible umbilical hernia since birth, mental retardation, and delayed developmental milestones. After meticulous clinical examination with subsequent integration of clinical findings and investigations, we diagnosed her to possibly have Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. An attempt to compare the findings of our index case with the classical features as described by Greally et al. has been made. Given the rarity of this syndrome and the paucity of medical literature measuring the magnitude of this condition in the Indian population, this case serves to promote awareness of this rare entity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2014.1888DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3941576PMC
March 2014

Pattern of injury in fatal road traffic accidents in a rural area of western Maharashtra, India.

Australas Med J 2013 30;6(9):476-82. Epub 2013 Sep 30.

Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Fatal road traffic accidents (RTA) are a major cause of concern all over the world. The outcome of injuries sustained in an RTA depends on various factors including but not limited to: the location of the event, type of vehicle involved, nature of the roads, the time of accident, etc.

Aims: This study aims to investigate and evaluate prospectively the socio-demographic profile and pattern of injuries in victims of RTA in the rural area of the Ahmedanagar district of Maharashtra state.

Method: This prospective study included all victims of RTA that presented to our emergency room from 1 June 2007 to 31 May 2009 and were either found dead on arrival or died during treatment. All the victims were autopsied at the post-mortem centre of Rural Medical College, Loni.

Results: Ninety-eight RTA victims were studied during the period. The most commonly affected age group was 20-39 years. Men died in RTA more than women. Fatal RTA were more prevalent on the secondary road system (47.97 per cent) and especially involved pedestrian and two wheeler vehicle users. Large numbers (n=63, 64.28%) of victims either died on the scene or during transportation. Numbers of skeletal injuries (199) and internal organ injuries (202) exceeded the total number of victims (98) clearly indicating the multiplicity of injuries. The majority of RTA victims (n=46, 46.93%) died due to head injury. The study showed that most deaths in RTA, brought to a tertiary care rural hospital, took place either on the spot or within 24 hours of injury which is very alarming and highlights the need to take urgent steps to establish good pre-hospital care and provision of trauma services at site.

Conclusion: A computerised trauma registry is urgently needed to highlight risk factors, circumstances and chains of events leading to accidents. This would be extremely helpful in policy making and health management in India.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2013.1839DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3794418PMC
October 2013

An unusual branching pattern of common and external carotid artery in a human cadaver: a case report.

Australas Med J 2011 30;4(4):180-2. Epub 2011 Apr 30.

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

During a routine dissection in the Department of Anatomy of the Rural Medical College, Loni, we found a rare variation in branching pattern of the common carotid artery (CCA) and external carotid artery (ECA) bilaterally. The knowledge of possible anatomical variations of CCA and ECA are especially important in the surgeries of head, neck and face; and also for the radiologist to understand and interpret carotid system imaging when undertaking cerebral angiography. This case and the clinical significance of this variation are reported in this paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2011.637DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562896PMC
July 2013

Prescription writing practices in a rural tertiary care hospital in Western Maharashtra, India.

Australas Med J 2011 31;4(1):4-8. Epub 2011 Jan 31.

Professor, Department of Community Medicine (PSM), Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Prescription is a written order from physician to pharmacist which contains name of drug, its dose and its method of dispensing and advice over consuming it. The frequency of drug prescription errors is high. Prescribing error contributes significantly towards adverse drug events. The present study was undertaken to understand the current prescription writing practices and to detect the common errors in them at a tertiary health care centre situated in a rural area of Western Maharashtra, India.

Method: A cross sectional study was conducted at a tertiary level hospital located at a rural area of Maharashtra state, India during October 2009-March 2010. 499 prescriptions coming to medical store during period of one month were considered for data analysis. Important information regarding the patient, doctor, drug and the general description of the prescription were obtained.

Results: All the prescriptions were on the hospital pad. A significant number of the prescriptions (n=88, 17.6%) were written in illegible handwriting and not easily readable. The name, age and sex of the patient were mentioned is majority of the prescriptions. All the prescriptions (100%) failed to demonstrate the presence of address, height and weight of the patient. Only the brand name of the drugs was mentioned in all the prescriptions with none of them having the generic name. The strength, quantity and route of administration of the drug were found on 73.1%, 65.3% and 75.2% prescriptions.

Conclusion: There are widespread errors in prescription writing by the doctors. Educational intervention programs and use of computer can substantially contribute in the lowering of such errors. A short course on prescription writing before the medical student enters the clinical field and strict monitoring by the administrative authorities may also help alleviate the problem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2011.515DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562966PMC
February 2013

A cross-sectional study of socio-demographic determinants of recurrent diarrhoea among children under five of rural area of Western Maharashtra, India.

Australas Med J 2011 28;4(2):72-5. Epub 2011 Feb 28.

Assistant Professor, Medical Intern Department of Community Medicine, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

Background: About 2 million episodes of diarrhoea occur each year in India. Of the 6.6 million deaths among children aged 28 days to 5 year; deaths from diarrhoea are estimated to account for 1.87 million. An average Indian child less than 5 years of age can have 2-3 episodes of diarrhoea. Mother's literacy, family income, feeding practices, environmental conditions are important determinants of the common childhood infection like diarrhoea. The present study was undertaken to study these important determinants of recurrent diarrhoea among children under five in a rural area of western Maharashtra, India.

Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in six randomly selected villages of Ahmednagar district in western Maharashtra, India. Three villages from two primary health centres and 652 children under five from these villages were chosen by a simple random sampling technique (every fifth child enrolled in Anganwadi). House-to-house survey was done and data was collected by interviewing the mothers of these children. Nutritional status was assessed by measuring the weight and mid-arm circumference of the child. Statistical analysis was done with Microsoft Excel and StatistiXL 1.8 using percentage, proportions and chi-square test wherever applicable.

Results: The prevalence of recurrent diarrhoea was 9.81%. Recurrent diarrhoea was more common in the age group of 13 - 24 months (29.6%) and 25 - 36 months (23.4%) and children belonging to lower socioeconomic class (64%). Malnutrition was significantly associated with recurrent diarrhoea and 21% of malnourished children had the same. Recurrent diarrhoea was significantly more common (39.1%) among children with introduction of top-up feeds before four to six months.

Conclusion: Low socioeconomic status, bad sanitary practices, nutritional status and weaning practices significantly influence the prevalence of recurrent diarrhoea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2011.524DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562926PMC
February 2013

A rare mitochondrial disorder: Leigh syndrome--a case report.

Ital J Pediatr 2010 Sep 15;36:62. Epub 2010 Sep 15.

Rural Medical College, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive neurodegenerative, mitochondrial disorder of childhood with only a few cases documented from India. The clinical presentation of Leigh syndrome is highly variable. However, in most cases it presents as a progressive neurological disease with motor and intellectual developmental delay and signs and symptoms of brain stem and/or basal ganglia involvement. Raised lactate levels in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid is noted. It is the neuroimaging, mainly the Magnetic Resonance Imaging showing characteristic symmetrical necrotic lesions in the basal ganglia and/or brain stem that leads to the diagnosis. Here, we report a case of 7 months old female child presenting to us with status epilepticus, delayed developmental milestones and regression of the achieved milestones suspected to be a case of neurodegenerative disorder, which on MRI was diagnosed as Leigh syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-36-62DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2949674PMC
September 2010
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