Publications by authors named "Swetha Rani Kanduri"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Industry Payments to Nephrologists in the United States.

Cureus 2021 Aug 10;13(8):e17057. Epub 2021 Aug 10.

Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, USA.

Background Industry payments to physicians raise concerns about conflicts of interest that have the potential to impact patient care. In this study, we explored nonresearch and nonownership payments from industry to nephrologists to identify trends in compensation. Methodology Using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), we explored financial relationships between industry and US nephrologists from 2014 to 2018. We analyzed payment characteristics including payment categories, payment distribution among physicians, regional trends, and biomedical manufacturers. Results In this retrospective study, a total of $75,174,999 was paid to nephrologists in the United States during the study period (i.e., 2014-2018). The number of board-certified nephrologists receiving payment from the industry increased from 11,642 in 2014 to 13,297 in 2018. Among board-certified nephrologists, 56% to 63% received industry payments during the study period. The total payments to nephrologists increased from $13,113,512 in 2014 to $16,467,945 in 2017, with consulting fees (24%) and compensation for services other than consulting (35%) being the highest-paid categories. The top 10% of physician beneficiaries collected 90% of the total industry payments. Conclusions A small proportion of US nephrologists consistently received the majority of industry payments, the value of which grew over the study period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.17057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8428165PMC
August 2021

A Rare Case of Patiromer Induced Hypercalcemia.

J Clin Med 2021 Aug 23;10(16). Epub 2021 Aug 23.

Department of Nephrology, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70121, USA.

Patiromer is a calcium (Ca)-potassium (K) exchange resin approved for the treatment of hyperkalemia. Disorders of Ca or acid base balance were not reported in pre-approval clinical trials. We present a case of a patient with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with an unusual picture of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia upon intensification of patiromer dosing. A 56-year-old white man with CKD stage 4 (baseline creatinine 2.8 mg/dL) due to type 1 diabetes mellitus, proteinuria (1.5 g/g) and persistently high serum potassium 5.9 mEq/L attributed to type 4 renal tubular acidosis was evaluated in clinic. Due to high risk of CKD progression, patiromer 8.4 g daily, followed by 16.8 g daily was prescribed to enable renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor. After 5 months of being on patiromer 16.8 g daily, routine laboratory tests revealed serum potassium 2.5 mEq/L, serum calcium 12.8 mg/dL and carbon dioxide 34 mEq/L. Patiromer was discontinued and thorough investigation held was negative for other causes of hypercalcemia. Five days after patiromer discontinuation, serum calcium returned to normal. The role of secondary hyperparathyroidism in this case remains unclear. We, therefore recommend cautious vigilance of patients receiving patiromer and undergoing dose escalation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10163756DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8396952PMC
August 2021

Multiple Myeloma, Hyperviscosity, Hemodialysis Filter Clogging, and Antigen Excess Artifact: A Case Report.

Kidney Med 2021 Jul-Aug;3(4):649-652. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Department of Nephrology, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA.

Kidney involvement in multiple myeloma can result in kidney failure. Unlike Waldenström macroglobulinemia, hyperviscosity syndrome is a rare occurrence in multiple myeloma. Timely detection of hyperviscosity syndrome and initiation of plasma exchange to remove paraproteins can significantly alter the clinical course and be potentially lifesaving. We report a case of hospitalized patient with kidney failure due to multiple myeloma not in remission who experienced shortened hemodialysis sessions due to early dialysis filter failure due to hyperviscosity, which was later corrected with plasmapheresis. When confirmation of high levels of serum free light chains (sFLCs) was attempted, sFLC was initially reported as "not detectable." This false-negative result reflected a laboratory artifact caused by a high abundance of sFLCs, known as antigen excess or hook phenomenon. Manual serial dilutions led to unmasking of markedly elevated κ light chain levels. This case exemplifies that patients with multiple myeloma can exhibit clinically challenging kidney manifestations even after becoming dialysis dependent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xkme.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8350819PMC
April 2021

A Case of Hypophosphatemia due to Oncogenic Osteomalacia in a Patient with Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma.

Kidney Blood Press Res 2021 Jul 22:1-5. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Ochsner Clinical School/The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Introduction: Oncogenic osteomalacia (Onc-Ost) is a paraneoplastic phenomenon characterized by hypophosphatemia due to elevated fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). Onc-Ost has been previously reported in patients with germ line mesenchymal tumors and solid organ malignancies. This is the first report of aggressive natural killer (NK) T-cell lymphoma presenting as Onc-Ost.

Case Description: A 33-year-old Vietnamese female with active hepatitis B and Mycobacterium avium complex, on ongoing therapy with tenofovir disoproxil, azithromycin, and ethambutol, presented with persistent fevers and developed refractory hypophosphatemia. Workup confirmed severe renal phosphate wasting. Tenofovir disoproxil was initially suspected; however, presence of isolated phosphaturia without Fanconi syndrome and persistence of hypophosphatemia despite discontinuation of medication led to clinical suspicion of Onc-Ost. Elevated FGF-23 warranted further workup, leading to a definitive diagnosis of clinically subtle NK T-cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy was initiated; however, patient continued to deteriorate clinically and expired.

Conclusion: Along with commonly reported germ line mesenchymal tumors and solid malignancies, NK T-cell lymphoma can also present as Onc-Ost. Timely detection of associated tumors and subsequent antitumor therapy would likely reverse hypophosphatemia and improve clinical outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000516390DOI Listing
July 2021

Kidney Recovery From Acute Kidney Injury After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Cureus 2021 Jan 1;13(1):e12418. Epub 2021 Jan 1.

Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA.

Patients with the recovery of kidney function after an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI) have better outcomes compared to those without recovery. The current systematic review is conducted to assess the rates of kidney function recovery among patients with AKI or severe AKI requiring kidney replacement therapy (KRT) within 100 days after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Methods The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were systemically searched from database inceptions through August 2019 to identify studies reporting the rates of recovery from AKI after HSCT. The random-effects and generic inverse variance methods of DerSimonian-Laird were used to combine the effect estimates obtained from individual studies. Results A total of 458 patients from eight cohort studies with AKI after HSCT were identified. Overall, the pooled estimated rates of AKI recovery among patients with AKI and severe AKI requiring KRT within 100 days were 58% (95%CI: 37%-78%) and 10% (95%CI: 2%-4%), respectively. Among patients with AKI recovery, the pooled estimated rates of complete and partial AKI recovery were 60% (95%CI: 39%-78%) and 29% (95%CI: 10%-61%), respectively. There was no clear correlation between study year and the rate of AKI recovery (p=0.26). Conclusion The rate of recovery from AKI after HSCT depends on the severity of AKI. While recovery is common, complete recovery is reported in about two-thirds of all AKI patients. The rate of recovery among those with AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) is substantially lower.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.12418DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7847721PMC
January 2021

Outcomes of COVID-19 in Solid Organ Transplants.

Cureus 2020 Nov 5;12(11):e11344. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Nephrology, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, USA.

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic affecting millions of people worldwide. Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are probably at higher risk of severe infection and associated complications from COVID-19. Data on clinical outcomes of COVID-19 infection in SOT recipients are limited. Using the TriNetX database, patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from January 20, 2020, to July 7, 2020, were included in the study. We compared clinical outcomes comprising hospitalization, need for critical care services, intubation, and mortality among SOT recipients and patients without SOT. Of 30,573 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients, 288 had SOT. Patients with SOT were more likely to be hospitalized (37.2% vs. 12.2%; p < 0.0001), needed critical care services (6.9% vs. 2.3%; p < 0.0001), needed intubation (7.9% vs. 2.0%; p < 0.0001), and had a higher 30-day mortality (11.1% vs. 3.8%; p < 0.0001). Patients in the transplant group were older (55.4 vs. 47.6 years; p < 0.0001) and had a higher prevalence of medical co-morbidities. SOT recipients are at significant risk of adverse COVID-19 related outcomes, including hospitalization, need for critical care services, and 30-day mortality, likely due to multiple co-morbid conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.11344DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7647837PMC
November 2020

Risk Factors and Management of Osteoporosis Post-Transplant.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2020 Jun 19;56(6). Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Department of Internal Medicine and Mississippi Center for Clinical and Translational Research, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39156, USA.

Bone and mineral disorders are common after organ transplantation. Osteoporosis post transplantation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Pathogenesis of bone disorders in this particular sub set of the population is complicated by multiple co-existing factors like preexisting bone disease, Vitamin D deficiency and parathyroid dysfunction. Risk factors include post-transplant immobilization, steroid usage, diabetes mellitus, low body mass index, older age, female sex, smoking, alcohol consumption and a sedentary lifestyle. Immunosuppressive medications post-transplant have a negative impact on outcomes, and further aggravate osteoporotic risk. Management is complex and challenging due to the sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of non-invasive diagnostic tests, and the underutilization of bone biopsy. In this review, we summarize the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic tests and management of osteoporosis in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina56060302DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7353876PMC
June 2020
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