Publications by authors named "Swaroopa Vaidya"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of local insulin delivery on subperiosteal angiogenesis and mineralized tissue formation during fracture healing.

J Orthop Res 2013 May 13;31(5):783-91. Epub 2012 Dec 13.

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, Suite 7300, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

Local insulin delivery has been shown to improve osseous healing in diabetic animals. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of local intramedullary delivery of saline or Ultralente insulin (UL) on various fracture healing parameters using an in vivo non-diabetic BB Wistar rat model. Quantitation of local insulin levels showed a rapid release of insulin from the fractured femora, demonstrating complete release at 2 days. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of early osteogenic markers (Col1α2, osteopontin) was significantly enhanced with UL treatment when compared with saline controls (p < 0.05). Significant differences in VEGF + cells and vascularity were evident between the treatment and control groups at day 7 (p < 0.05). At day 21, histomorphometric analysis demonstrated a significant increase in percent mineralized tissue in the UL-treated animals compared with controls (p < 0.05), particularly within the subperiosteal region of the fracture callus. Mechanical testing at 4 weeks showed significantly greater mechanical strength for UL-treated animals (p < 0.05), but healing in control animals caught up at 6 weeks post-fracture. These results suggest that the primary osteogenic effect of UL during the early stages of fracture healing (1-3 weeks) is through an increase in osteogenic gene expression, subperiosteal angiogenesis, and mineralized tissue formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.22288DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6446235PMC
May 2013

Local insulin therapy affects fracture healing in a rat model.

J Orthop Res 2013 May 13;31(5):776-82. Epub 2012 Dec 13.

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Medicine, Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, 90 Bergen Street, Suite 7300, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

A significant number of lower extremity fractures result in mal-union necessitating effective treatments to restore ambulation. Prior research in diabetic animal fracture models demonstrated improved healing following local insulin application to the fracture site and indicated that local insulin therapy can aid bone regeneration, at least within an insulin-dependent diabetic animal model. This study tested whether local insulin therapy could accelerate femur fracture repair in normal, non-diabetic rats. High (20 units) and low (10 units) doses of insulin were delivered in a calcium sulfate carrier which provided sustained release of the exogenous insulin for 7 days after fracture. Histomorphometry, radiographic scoring, and torsional mechanical testing were used to measure fracture healing. The fracture calluses from rats treated with high-dose insulin had significantly more cartilage than untreated rats after 7 and 14 days of healing. After 4 weeks of healing, femurs from rats treated with low-dose insulin had significantly higher radiographic scores and mechanical strength (p < 0.05), compared to the no treatment control groups. The results of this study suggest that locally delivered insulin is a potential therapeutic agent for treating bone fractures. Further studies are necessary, such as large animal proof of concepts, prior to the clinical use of insulin for bone fracture treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.22287DOI Listing
May 2013

Role of local insulin augmentation upon allograft incorporation in a rat femoral defect model.

J Orthop Res 2011 Jan;29(1):92-9

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, Newark, New Jersey 07103, USA.

Each year, over one million orthopedic operations are performed which a bony defect is presence, requiring the use of further augmentation in addition to bony fixation. Application of autogenous bone graft is the standard of care to promote healing of these defects, but several determents exist in using autogenous bone graft exist including limited supply and donor site morbidity. Prior work has demonstrated that local insulin application to fracture sites promote fracture healing, but no work has been performed to date in its effects upon defect healing/allograft incorporation. The goal of this study was to examine the potential role of local insulin application upon allograft incorporation. Microradiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analysis outcome parameters showed that local insulin significantly accelerated new bone formation. Histological comparisons using predetermined scoring systems demonstrated significantly greater healing in femora treated with insulin compared to control femora (p < 0.001). Quantitatively more bone production was also observed, specifically in areas of endosteal (p = 0.010) and defect (p = 0.041) bone in femora treated with local insulin, compared to control femora, 6 weeks after implantation. This study demonstrates the potential of local insulin as an adjunct for the treatment of segmental defect and allograft incorporation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.21205DOI Listing
January 2011

Cellular uptake of functional nanogels prepared by inverse miniemulsion ATRP with encapsulated proteins, carbohydrates, and gold nanoparticles.

Biomacromolecules 2009 Aug;10(8):2300-9

Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to produce a versatile drug delivery system capable of encapsulating a range of molecules. Inverse miniemulsion ATRP permitted the synthesis of biocompatible and uniformly cross-linked poly(ethylene oxide)-based nanogels entrapping gold nanoparticles, bovine serum albumin, rhodamine B isothiocyanate-dextran, or fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran. These moieties were entrapped to validate several biological outcomes and to model delivery of range of molecules. Cellular uptake of nanogels was verified by transmission electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. Fluorescent colocalization of nanogels with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody for clathrin indicated clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, internalization of nanogels either with or without GRGDS cell attachment-mediating peptides was quantified using flow cytometry. After 45 min of incubation, the uptake of unmodified FITC-Dx-loaded nanogels was 62%, whereas cellular uptake increased to >95% with the same concentration of GRGDS-modified FITC-Dx nanogels. In addition, a spheroidal coculture of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) validated cell endocytosis. Application of ATRP enabled the synthesis of a functionalized drug delivery system with a uniform network that is capable of encapsulating and delivering inorganic, organic, and biological molecules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm9004904DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5305297PMC
August 2009

Response of bone subjected to optimized high dose irradiation.

J Biomater Appl 2010 Jan 5;24(5):387-400. Epub 2008 Nov 5.

Statseal Inc., 5150 Village Park Drive SE, Suite 110, Bellevue, WA 98006, USA.

Allograft tissues are used in over one million musculoskeletal procedures per year. Consequently, it is crucial tissue banks use procedures to militate against allograft associated bacterial and viral infections. Recent studies have identified an important pathogen inactivation technology for musculoskeletal allografts that utilizes high-dose gamma irradiation (50 kGy) under controlled conditions. A total dose of 50 kGy assures that the current standard for medical devices for a microbial sterility assurance level of 10(- 6) is met. Furthermore, the pathogen inactivation technology results in a greater than four log inactivation of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses. Efficacious clinical outcome from musculoskeletal allografts exposed to this innovative sterilization procedure will require that there is no performance decrement in the allograft's biological properties. Therefore, to validate this objective, we executed a study focusing on remodeling and osteoconduction of bone allografts treated with a high dose of gamma irradiation (50 kGy), radioprotectants and well-defined operating parameters of temperature and water content. A rabbit calvarial model was used to test the hypothesis that remodeling and osteoconduction of allogeneic bone treated with the new pathogen inactivation technology would be equivalent to nontreated allogeneic bone. Results indicated treated bone allografts were comparable to nontreated allografts. We conclude, therefore, that based on this outcome and other reports, that high doses of gamma irradiation under optimized conditions designed to reduce free radical damage to tissue will provide safer allografts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0885328208097088DOI Listing
January 2010