Publications by authors named "Sven Pfeifer"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

New binding mode to TNF-alpha revealed by ubiquitin-based artificial binding protein.

PLoS One 2012 20;7(2):e31298. Epub 2012 Feb 20.

Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany.

A variety of approaches have been employed to generate binding proteins from non-antibody scaffolds. Utilizing a beta-sheet of the human ubiquitin for paratope creation we obtained binding proteins against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The bioactive form of this validated pharmacological target protein is a non-covalently linked homo-trimer. This structural feature leads to the observation of a certain heterogeneity concerning the binding mode of TNF-alpha binding molecules, for instance in terms of monomer/trimer specificity. We analyzed a ubiquitin-based TNF-alpha binder, selected by ribosome display, with a particular focus on its mode of interaction. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, specific binding to TNF-alpha with nanomolar affinity was observed. In isothermal titration calorimetry we obtained comparable results regarding the affinity and detected an exothermic reaction with one ubiquitin-derived binding molecule binding one TNF-alpha trimer. Using NMR spectroscopy and other analytical methods the 1:3 stoichiometry could be confirmed. Detailed binding analysis showed that the interaction is affected by the detergent Tween-20. Previously, this phenomenon was reported only for one other type of alternative scaffold-derived binding proteins--designed ankyrin repeat proteins--without further investigation. As demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, the presence of the detergent increases the association rate significantly. Since the special architecture of TNF-alpha is known to be modulated by detergents, the access to the recognized epitope is indicated to be restricted by conformational transitions within the target protein. Our results suggest that the ubiquitin-derived binding protein targets a new epitope on TNF-alpha, which differs from the epitopes recognized by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0031298PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3282696PMC
June 2012

Recombinant production of bioactive human TNF-alpha by SUMO-fusion system--high yields from shake-flask culture.

Protein Expr Purif 2010 Aug 2;72(2):238-43. Epub 2010 Apr 2.

NWG Künstliche Bindeproteine, Institut für Biochemie und Biotechnologie, Technische Biochemie, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Heinrich-Damerow-Str. 4, 06120 Halle, Germany.

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) inhibitors, used for the treatment of common inflammatory diseases, currently belong among the most important biotechnologically produced pharmaceuticals. So far four TNF-alpha antagonists have been approved by regulatory authorities for defined subsets of applications. Furthermore, numerous approaches are being taken to develop new protein-based pharmaceuticals and to broaden their application areas in the treatment of TNF-alpha -related diseases. Both the fundamental understanding of disease-related TNF-alpha activity and the subsequent development of corresponding drug candidates demand the availability of large amounts of TNF-alpha as a bioactive protein. We have therefore established a protocol for the rapid high-level synthesis of recombinant human TNF-alpha in Escherichia coli shake-flask cultures and the subsequent purification of the mature protein. Using the advantages of SUMO-fusion technology we were able to produce protein with an authentic N-terminus in high yield. Two immobilized metal ion-affinity chromatography steps with a protease cleavage step in between and subsequent size-exclusion chromatography were utilized to purify the protein. The protein was obtained from the last chromatography step as a trimer, while purity was at least 96% as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The identity of the protein was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Recombinant mature TNF-alpha was correctly folded as assessed by CD spectroscopy and its biological activity was confirmed by an L929 cell assay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2010.03.022DOI Listing
August 2010

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two thermostable DNA nucleases.

Acta Crystallogr Sect F Struct Biol Cryst Commun 2006 Dec 30;62(Pt 12):1290-3. Epub 2006 Nov 30.

Center for Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, University of Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Temperature-tolerant organisms are an important source to enhance the stability of enzymes used in biotechnological processes. The DNA-cleaving enzyme exonuclease III from Escherichia coli is used in several applications in gene technology. A thermostable variant could expand the applicability of the enzyme in these methods. Two homologous nucleases from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (ExoAf) and Methanothermobacter thermoautrophicus (ExoMt) were studied for this purpose. Both enzymes were crystallized in different space groups using (poly)ethylene glycols, 2,4-methyl pentandiol, dioxane, ethanol or 2-propanol as precipitants. The addition of a 10-mer DNA oligonucleotide was important to obtain monoclinic crystals of ExoAf and ExoMt that diffracted to resolutions better than 2 A using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structures of the homologous proteins can serve as templates for genetic engineering of the E. coli exonuclease III and will aid in understanding the different catalytic properties of the enzymes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S1744309106050548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2225370PMC
December 2006

Identification and functional characterisation of genes and corresponding enzymes involved in carnitine metabolism of Proteus sp.

Arch Microbiol 2005 Mar 25;183(3):176-89. Epub 2005 Feb 25.

Pharmazie und Psychologie, Fakultät für Biowissenschaften, Institut für Biochemie, Universität Leipzig, Germany.

Enzymes involved in carnitine metabolism of Proteus sp. are encoded by the cai genes organised as the caiTABCDEF operon. The complete operon could be sequenced from the genomic DNA of Proteus sp. Amino acid sequence similarities and/or enzymatic analysis confirmed the function assigned to each protein involved in carnitine metabolism. CaiT was suggested to be an integral membrane protein responsible for the transport of betaines. The caiA gene product was shown to be a crotonobetainyl-CoA reductase catalysing the irreversible reduction of crotonobetainyl-CoA to gamma-butyrobetainyl-CoA. CaiB and CaiD were identified to be the two components of the crotonobetaine hydrating system, already described. CaiB and caiD were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification of both proteins, their individual enzymatic functions were solved. CaiB acts as betainyl-CoA transferase specific for carnitine, crotonobetaine, gamma-butyrobetaine and its CoA derivatives. Transferase reaction proceeds, following a sequential bisubstrate mechanism. CaiD was identified to be a crotonobetainyl-CoA hydratase belonging to the crotononase superfamily. Because of amino acid sequence similarities, CaiC was suggested to be a betainyl-CoA ligase. Taken together, these results show that the metabolism of carnitine and crotonobetaine in Proteus sp. proceeds at the CoA level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-005-0760-2DOI Listing
March 2005

A recombinant exonuclease III homologue of the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

DNA Repair (Amst) 2005 Apr 8;4(4):433-44. Epub 2005 Jan 8.

Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biosciences, Pharmacy and Psychology, University of Leipzig/Biotechnological-Biomedical Centre Leipzig, Brüderstrasse 34, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

AP endonucleases catalyse an important step in the base excision repair (BER) pathway by incising the phosphodiester backbone of damaged DNA immediately 5' to an abasic site. Here, we report the cloning and expression of the 774 bp Mth0212 gene from the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, which codes for a putative AP endonuclease. The 30.3 kDa protein shares 30% sequence identity with exonuclease III (ExoIII) of Escherichia coli and 40% sequence identity with the human AP endonuclease Ape1. The gene was amplified from a culture sample and cloned into an expression vector. Using an E. coli host, the thermophilic protein could be produced and purified. Characterization of the enzymatic activity revealed strong binding and Mg2+-dependent nicking activity on undamaged double-stranded (ds) DNA at low ionic strength, even at temperatures below the optimum growth temperature of M. thermautotrophicus (65 degrees C). Additionally, a much faster nicking activity on AP site containing DNA was demonstrated. Unspecific incision of undamaged ds DNA was nearly inhibited at KCl concentration of approximately 0.5 M, whereas incision at AP sites was still complete at such salt concentrations. Nicked DNA was further degraded at temperatures above 50 degrees C, probably by an exonucleolytic activity of the enzyme, which was also found on recessed 3' ends of linearized ds DNA. The enzyme was active at temperatures up to 70 degrees C and, using circular dichroism spectroscopy, shown to denature at temperatures approaching 80 degrees C. Considering the high intracellular potassium ion concentration in M. thermautotrophicus, our results suggest that the characterized thermophilic enzyme acts as an AP endonuclease in vivo with similar activities as Ape1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dnarep.2004.11.008DOI Listing
April 2005