Publications by authors named "Suzie Aparecida de Lacerda"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of Crystallized Biosilicate in the Reconstruction of Calvarial Defects.

J Maxillofac Oral Surg 2015 Sep 10;14(3):659-65. Epub 2015 Mar 10.

Dentistry School of Araçatuba, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), São Paulo, Brazil.

Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess the bone repair process of crystallized Biosilicate in surgically created defects on rats' calvaria. This biomaterial was recently developed for odontological use.

Materials And Methods: We used fifteen rats (rattus norvegicus albinus, Wistar), and two 5 mm surgical defects were performed on each of them; the defects were made with trephine drill on the calvarium region prior to the biomaterial placement. Groups were divided as follows: Group 1-defect filled with clot; Group 2-defect filled with crystallized Biosilicate. After 7, 14 and 28 days the animals were killed, the parts were retrieved and slides were prepared for histological studies.

Results: Bone formation was satisfactory in all groups, with direct contact between biomaterial surface and bone and absence of infection signs. The 28 days periods showed better results, and statistically significant difference between Clot Group (90.2 %) and Biosilicate (58 %; p = 0.002) was seen, regarding presence of bone tissue on the surgical defects.

Conclusion: Our study revealed that defects filled with clot present better results on bone formation compared to crystallized Biosilicate, which is considered a biocompatible material with favorable osteoconductive properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12663-015-0755-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4511902PMC
September 2015

Effects of coffee intake and intraperitoneal caffeine on bone repair process--a histologic and histometric study.

Braz Dent J 2015 Mar-Apr;26(2):175-80. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

Public Health and Forensic Dentistry;Department of Stomatology, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, USP - University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Studies have suggested that caffeine acts on bone promoting an increase of calcium excretion, inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and delay in tissue repair process, raising the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, periodontal disease and affecting the success of bone reconstructive procedures. The aim of this study was to analyze histomorphometrically the process of alveolar bone healing after tooth extraction in rats subjected to daily intake of boiled coffee or intraperitoneal administration of caffeine. Forty-five male rats were divided according to the treatment in Control group (C); Coffee group (CO) - treated with coffee since birth; and Caffeine (CAF) - intraperitoneal injection of aqueous solution of caffeine 1.5% (0.2 mL/100g body weight) for 30 days. When weighing between 250-300 g they were anesthetized, subjected to extraction of the maxillary right incisor, and euthanized 7, 21 and 42 days after surgery for histological assessments of bone volume and the quality of formed bone in the dental socket. The qualitative results demonstrated larger amounts of blood clot and immature bone in animals under treatment of pure caffeine compared to coffee and control. Histometric analysis revealed that coffee treatment led to a 40% drop in bone formation, and caffeine a 60% drop in comparison to control animals (ANOVA p≤0.01). It was concluded that both the daily ingestion of coffee and the intraperitoneal administration of caffeine in rats delayed the alveolar bone reparative process after tooth extraction, and this effect was more aggressive when pure caffeine was used.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0103-6440201300219DOI Listing
December 2016

A retrospective study of oral manifestations in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis.

Braz Dent J 2012 ;23(6):753-7

Department of Stomatology, Ribeirão Preto Dental School, USP - University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

South American blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis (Pb mycosis) or Lutz disease is an endemically fungal infection in Latin America. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and may cause oral mucosal lesions. The incidence of Pb mycosis oral lesions was evaluated in patients assisted at a Brazilian Dental School's Specialized Oral Diagnosis Service with special focus on the different clinical forms of these lesions, its location, patients' occupation, deleterious habits, and diagnosis methodology. Students' and professionals' initial diagnoses were compared with the definitive diagnosis. Lesions were detected 31 cases (18 patients). The results show that 88.8% of the patients were male with a mean age of 50 years and 39% work(ed) with activities related to agriculture. As much as 88.9% were smokers and 72.2% were alcohol users. Exfoliative cytology was performed in 66.6% of the patients. Oral mucosa (30%), gingiva (16.6%) and lips 16.6% were the most common sites of Pb mycosis oral lesions. Comparing the initial with the definitive diagnosis made by the professionals their accuracy was 33% (6 out of 18 patients). Students' diagnosis was more accurate demonstrating 72.5% of initial correct diagnosis (13 out of 18). Statistical analysis by ANOVA (α=0.05, SPSS WIN) demonstrated a significant difference between the diagnosis of Pb mycosis made by students and professionals when considering initial diagnosis and final diagnosis (after histopathological analysis) (p=0.25). Incisional biopsy and exfoliate cytology are efficient for an early diagnosis of this disease in mouth. Students' training in diagnosis of oral pathologies to recognize lesions is urgent to improve public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0103-64402012000600021DOI Listing
January 2014

Evaluation of the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated cells from oral lesions previously identified by toluidine blue.

Acta Cytol 2011 22;55(4):344-9. Epub 2011 Jul 22.

Universidade de Franca, Franca, Brasil.

Objective: Patients using a removable prosthesis are susceptible to a variety of oral lesions that may progress to cancer. Toluidine blue (TB) staining is used to identify premalignant lesions, but the results are still controversial. Since micronuclei (MN) are a biomarker of genetic instability, the objective of this study was to determine the frequency of MN in white lesions of the oral mucosa and to compare the results with those of the TB test.

Study Design: The study included 20 removable prosthesis users with white lesions that were previously classified as toluidine positive or negative. The frequency of MN was evaluated in exfoliated cells from lesions and normal mucosa. Nuclear anomalies were also registered.

Results: A significant increase (p < 0.05) in the frequency of MN was observed in exfoliated cells from lesions compared to normal mucosal cells, and no relationship was seen with TB staining. Lifestyle factors or gender did not influence the results.

Conclusions: The frequency of MN is a sensitive biomarker and can be used to predict genomic instability in white oral lesions. The MN assay may serve as a good parameter in the battery of tests used to identify high-risk individuals, contributing to the identification of the biological conditions of oral lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000326945DOI Listing
September 2011

Intraosseous schwannoma of mandibular symphysis: case report.

Braz Dent J 2006 ;17(3):255-8

Department of Morphology, Stomatology and Physiology, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Schwannoma (neurilemmoma) is a benign neoplasm originated from the neural sheath and occurring most frequently in the head and neck. Intraosseous schwannomas are rare. The mandible is the most common site of occurrence for these lesions. This article reports the case of an intraosseous schwannoma located in the mandibular symphysis of an 11-year-old boy. The lesion was surgically removed and no radiographic evidence of recurrence was observed after 5 years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0103-64402006000300015DOI Listing
March 2007