Publications by authors named "Suthat Fuchareon"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Copy number variation in Thai population.

PLoS One 2014 13;9(8):e104355. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Research Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; Integrative Computation BioScience Center (ICBS), Mahidol University, Nakhon Prathom, Thailand.

Copy number variation (CNV) is a major genetic polymorphism contributing to genetic diversity and human evolution. Clinical application of CNVs for diagnostic purposes largely depends on sufficient population CNV data for accurate interpretation. CNVs from general population in currently available databases help classify CNVs of uncertain clinical significance, and benign CNVs. Earlier studies of CNV distribution in several populations worldwide showed that a significant fraction of CNVs are population specific. In this study, we characterized and analyzed CNVs in 3,017 unrelated Thai individuals genotyped with the Illumina Human610, Illumina HumanOmniexpress, or Illumina HapMap550v3 platform. We employed hidden Markov model and circular binary segmentation methods to identify CNVs, extracted 23,458 CNVs consistently identified by both algorithms, and cataloged these high confident CNVs into our publicly available Thai CNV database. Analysis of CNVs in the Thai population identified a median of eight autosomal CNVs per individual. Most CNVs (96.73%) did not overlap with any known chromosomal imbalance syndromes documented in the DECIPHER database. When compared with CNVs in the 11 HapMap3 populations, CNVs found in the Thai population shared several characteristics with CNVs characterized in HapMap3. Common CNVs in Thais had similar frequencies to those in the HapMap3 populations, and all high frequency CNVs (>20%) found in Thai individuals could also be identified in HapMap3. The majorities of CNVs discovered in the Thai population, however, were of low frequency, or uniquely identified in Thais. When performing hierarchical clustering using CNV frequencies, the CNV data were clustered into Africans, Europeans, and Asians, in line with the clustering performed with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. As CNV data are specific to origin of population, our population-specific reference database will serve as a valuable addition to the existing resources for the investigation of clinical significance of CNVs in Thais and related ethnicities.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0104355PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4131886PMC
April 2015

Mapping human genetic diversity in Asia.

Science 2009 Dec;326(5959):1541-5

Asia harbors substantial cultural and linguistic diversity, but the geographic structure of genetic variation across the continent remains enigmatic. Here we report a large-scale survey of autosomal variation from a broad geographic sample of Asian human populations. Our results show that genetic ancestry is strongly correlated with linguistic affiliations as well as geography. Most populations show relatedness within ethnic/linguistic groups, despite prevalent gene flow among populations. More than 90% of East Asian (EA) haplotypes could be found in either Southeast Asian (SEA) or Central-South Asian (CSA) populations and show clinal structure with haplotype diversity decreasing from south to north. Furthermore, 50% of EA haplotypes were found in SEA only and 5% were found in CSA only, indicating that SEA was a major geographic source of EA populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1177074DOI Listing
December 2009

Simple method for screening of alpha-thalassaemia 1 carriers.

Int J Hematol 2009 Jun 14;89(5):559-67. Epub 2009 May 14.

Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Biomedical Technology Research Center, National Sciences and Technology Development Agency, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Alpha-thalassaemia 1 genetic disorder occurs when there is a deletion of two linked alpha-globin genes. The interaction between these abnormal genes leads to the most severe type of thalassaemia disease, haemoglobin (Hb) Bart's hydrops fetalis. The identification of alpha-thalassaemia 1 carriers and genetic counselling are essential for the prevention and control of severe thalassaemia diseases. In this study, we have developed a rapid screening method for identifying alpha-thalassaemia 1. A sandwich-type immunochromatographic (IC) strip test was developed, using the generated monoclonal anti-Hb Bart's antibody, to trace the Hb Bart's in haemolysates. When assayed by our IC strip test, all alpha-thalassaemia 1, HbH disease, HbH-Constant Spring (H-CS) disease, HbH-CS and heterozygous HbE (CSEA) Bart's disease, and homozygous alpha-thalassaemia 2 showed positive results. No false negative results were observed in these blood samples. In alpha-thalassaemia 2 heterozygotes, 83% of them showed positive reactivity. Among HbE (both homozygotes and heterozygotes), beta-thalassaemia (heterozygotes, homozygotes and beta-thalassaemia/HbE) and normal subjects, the IC strip test revealed negative reactivity of 100, 85 and 97%, respectively. These results indicate that this novel immunodiagnostic kit, in combination with red blood cell indices, is suitable for screening and ruling out mass populations for the presence of alpha-thalassaemia 1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12185-009-0331-4DOI Listing
June 2009