Dr. Sushanta Kumar Saha, PhD - Limerick Institute of Technology - Microalgal Biotechnologist

Dr. Sushanta Kumar Saha

PhD

Limerick Institute of Technology

Microalgal Biotechnologist

Limerick | Ireland

Additional Specialties: Microalgal and Cyanobacterial Molecular Biology & Biotechnology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-3981-8833

Dr. Sushanta Kumar Saha, PhD - Limerick Institute of Technology - Microalgal Biotechnologist

Dr. Sushanta Kumar Saha

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Limerick Institute of Technology - Limerick , Ireland

Additional Specialties:

Publications

27Publications

98Reads

23Profile Views

23PubMed Central Citations

Molecular Characterization of Twenty-Five Marine Cyanobacteria Isolated from Coastal Regions of Ireland

Biology

Twenty-five marine cyanobacteria isolated from Irish coasts were characterized based on their morphological characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) isoenzyme banding patterns were used to differentiate two morphologically ambiguous isolates. In this study, six new cyanobacteria-specific primers were designed, and a 16S rRNA gene of twenty-five morphologically diverse cyanobacteria was successfully PCR amplified (1198–1396 bps). Assembled 16S rRNA sequences were used both for a basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis for genus-level identification and to generate a phylogenetic tree, which yielded two major clusters: One with morphologically homogenous cyanobacteria and the other with morphologically very diverse cyanobacteria. Kamptonemaokenii and Tychonema decoloratum were isolated from a single field sample of Ballybunion and were originally identified as the same ‘Oscillatoria sp.’ based on preliminary morphological observations. However, an alignment of 16S rRNA gene sequences and SOD and MDH isoenzyme banding pattern analyses helped in differentiating the morphologically-indistinguishable ‘Oscillatoria sp.’. Finally, after a re-evaluation of their morphological characters using modern taxonomic publications, the originally identified ‘Oscillatoria sp.’ were re-identified as Kamptonema okenii and Tychonema decoloratum, thus supporting the polyphasic approach of cyanobacteria characterization.

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August 2019
1 Read

In Vitro Antithrombotic Properties of Salmon () Phospholipids in a Novel Food-Grade Extract.

Mar Drugs 2019 Jan 18;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland.

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http://www.mdpi.com/1660-3397/17/1/62
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md17010062DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357043PMC
January 2019
35 Reads
2.853 Impact Factor

The Carotenogenic CCAP 19/20 Produces Enhanced Levels of Carotenoid under Specific Nutrients Limitation.

Biomed Res Int 2018 30;2018:7532897. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick V94 E8YF, Ireland.

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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2018/7532897/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/7532897DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5952566PMC
October 2018
11 Reads

Exploitation of Microalgae Species for Nutraceutical Purposes: Cultivation Aspects

http://www.mdpi.com/2311-5637/4/2/46/htm

Fermentation

Cyanobacteria and microalgae have been cultivated only for a limited number of bioactive compounds or biotechnological applications such as for carotenoids; essential omega-3 fatty acids; phycobilipigments; live cells, unprocessed or minimally processed complete biomass as aqua feed, animal feed and human health supplements as rich sources of proteins, carbohydrates, pigments, vitamins and minerals. However, cyanobacteria and microalgae have been reported through several research investigations as a potential source for various bioactive molecules with marketable nutraceutical and pharmaceutical properties. Therefore, more cultivation of cyanobacteria and microalgae species are waiting for new biotechnological applications. At present, the global demand for microalgal applications is focused on biofuels including biodiesel and bioethanol apart from a handful (mentioned above) of bioactive compounds which are mostly used as nutraceuticals. Thus, microalgal biorefinery is growing rapidly for multiple commodities production from both conventional and photobioreactor-based cultivation for biomass feedstocks for various biotechnological applications. This review presents the cultivation aspects of selected cyanobacteria and microalgae for commercial purposes.

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June 2018
6 Reads

Structural Elucidation of Irish Organic Farmed Salmon (Salmo salar) Polar Lipids with Antithrombotic Activities.

Mar Drugs 2018 May 23;16(6). Epub 2018 May 23.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md16060176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025065PMC
May 2018
1 Read
1 Citation
2.853 Impact Factor

Structural Elucidation of Irish Organic Farmed Salmon (Salmo salar) Polar Lipids with Antithrombotic Activities

https://doi.org/10.3390/md16060176

Marine Drugs (MDPI)

While several marine polar lipids (PL) have exhibited cardioprotective properties through their effects on the platelet-activating factor (PAF) pathways, salmon PL have not been tested so far. In this study, the antithrombotic activities of salmon PL were assessed in human platelets and the structural characterisation of bioactive salmon PL was performed by GC-MS and LC-MS analyses. PL from fillets of Irish organic farmed salmon (Salmo salar) were extracted and separated into several lipid subclasses by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), while their fatty acid profile was fully characterised by GC-MS. Salmon total lipids (TL), total neutral lipids (TNL), total polar lipids (TPL), and each PL subclass obtained by TLC were further assessed for their in vitro effects towards PAF-induced and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation in human platelets. Salmon PL exhibited antithrombotic effects on human platelet aggregation, mostly through their strong inhibitory effects against the PAF pathway with IC50 values comparable to other marine PL, but with lower effects towards the thrombin pathway. PL fractions corresponding to phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives exhibited the most potent anti-PAF effects, while LC-MS analysis putatively elucidated their structure/function relationship. Several diacyl-PC/PE and alkyl-acyl-PC/PE species containing mostly docosahexaenoic acid at their sn-2 glycerol-backbone may be responsible for the bioactivity. The data presented suggests that salmon contains PL with strong antithrombotic bioactivities.

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May 2018
2 Reads

The Carotenogenic Dunaliella salina CCAP 19/20 Produces Enhanced Levels of Carotenoid under Specific Nutrients Limitation

Volume 2018, Article ID 7532897, 11 pages https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7532897

BioMed Research International

Dunaliella salina is the popular microalga for β-carotene production. There is still a growing demand for the best strain identification and growth conditions optimization for maximum carotenoids production. Some strains are noncarotenogenic while other strains may respond differently to applied growth conditions and produce enhanced carotenoid levels. This study tested the carotenogenic ability of Dunaliella salina CCAP 19/20 under sixteen stress conditions and certain biochemical changes in response to specific stress were investigated. This study identified the above strain as carotenogenic, which produces maximum carotenoids under high light (240 μmol photons m−2 sec−1) when combined nitrogen and micronutrients (Cu or CuMn) were limited. Based on the intensity of extracted ions chromatograms, lutein (m/z 568.4357) appears as the major carotenoid followed by β-carotene (m/z 536.4446) and α-carotene (m/z 536.4435). A polypeptide of 28.3 kDa appeared while another polypeptide of 25.5 kDa disappeared in stress cells as compared to noncarotenogenic cells. Expression levels of antioxidative-enzyme superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1, H2O2-resistant) remained identical, while the prominent H2O2-sensitive isoforms SOD2 and SOD3 were downregulated during carotenogenic conditions. Overall, increased carotenoids levels might be due to the response of differential expression of specific polypeptides and retention of H2O2-resistant SOD, which eventually might help the organism to thrive in the tested stress conditions.

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April 2018
5 Reads

Editorial: Microalgae and Cyanobacteria: The Heroes of Growing Industrial Biotechnology Sectors

Authors:
Saha S.K.

https://medwinpublishers.com/OAJMB/OAJMB16000123.pdf

Open Access Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology (OAJMB) ISSN: 2576-7771

Microalgae and cyanobacteria are microscopic photosynthetic organisms similar to higher plants,found both in marine and freshwater environments, and are the pioneer of oxygenic environment that we are breathing today. These microorganisms possess immense morphological and biochemical diversity, which allow them to survive in varied and extreme environmental conditions. Several years of researching on them allowed to find their potential applications in production of fine chemicals for food and cosmetics applications; health supplements and therapeutic applications; bioenergy production; environmental management such as wastewater treatment, land reclamation and capture of green-house gases including CO2-fixation; in agriculture as atmospheric N2-fixer, phosphate solubiliser and source of various plant-growth promoting factors; etc. All these applications simply explore their photosynthetic machinery to capture the light energy and use minimal nutrients to produce the biomass with specific bioactive or other desired biomolecules as bio-factory.

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March 2018
3 Reads

Identification of optimum fatty acid extraction methods for two different microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Haematococcus pluvialis for food and biodiesel applications

Anal Bioanal Chem. 2017 Jul;409(19):4659-4667.

Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

Microalgae have the potential to synthesize and accumulate lipids which contain high value fatty acids intended for nutrition and biodiesel applications. Nevertheless, lipid extraction methods for microalgae cells are not well established and there is not a standard analytical methodology to extract fatty acids from lipid-producing microalgae. In this paper, current lipid extraction procedures employing organic solvents (chloroform/methanol, 2:1 and 1:2, v/v), sodium hypochlorite solution (NaClO), acid-catalysed hot-water extraction and the saponification process [2.5 M KOH/methanol (1:4, v/v)] have been evaluated with two species of microalgae with different types of cell walls. One is a marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and the other a freshwater green microalga, Haematococcus pluvialis. Lipids from all types of extracts were estimated gravimetrically and their fatty acids were quantified by a HPLC equipped with Q-TOF mass spectrometer. Results indicated significant differences both in lipids yield and fatty acids composition. The chloroform and methanol mixture was the most effective extraction solvent for the unsaturated fatty acids such as DPA (C22:05), DHA, (C22:06), EPA (C20:05) and ARA (C20:04). While acid treatments improved the saturated fatty acids (SFAs) yield, especially the short chain SFA, lauric acid (C12:0), whose amount was 64% higher in P. tricornutum and 156% higher in H. pluvialis compared to organic solvent extractions.

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June 2017
5 Reads

Simultaneous Determination of 23 Azo Dyes in Paprika by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

Food Analytical Methods

The present work describes the development and validation of a simple, quick and precise gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of 23 azo dye breakdown products in paprika samples. After the extraction procedure, dyes were identified on an Agilent J&W DB-5ms Ultra Inert capillary column using dichloroethane as a sample dissolvent. Limits of detection (LODs) were comprised between 10.6 and 84.4 ng/mL. Accuracy values in the range of 90–104 % for the 23 azo dye breakdown products were obtained, and RSD% for the analysis of 2.4 μg/mL of each compound was below 4.6 % (n = 9). The recovery for the azo dyes in paprika samples was comprised between 71.2 ± 3.5 % (benzidine) and 118.9 ± 2.5 % (para-cresidine). Results of this study suggest that the developed method is suitable for detection and quantification of azo dye breakdown products in the range of 60–240 μg/kg paprika. In addition, this GC-MS method allowed the simultaneous determination of disperse orange 3 (azo dye) with high accuracy and precision. The method has numerous advantages such as simplicity, low cost, easy operation and short analysis time and constitutes an efficient method for the monitoring of a large number of azo dyes in food matrices.

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September 2016
3 Reads

Improved method for rapid detection of phthalates in bottled water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2015 Aug 11;997:229-35. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2015.05.036DOI Listing
August 2015
8 Reads
2.730 Impact Factor

Microalgae as a source of nutraceuticals.

https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118500354.ch12

Phycotoxins: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2nd Edition, Botana, L.M. and Alfonso, A. (eds.)

Microalgae have been recognized as rich sources of proteins, omega‐3 and ‐6 fatty acids, carbohydrates, pigments, vitamins, minerals and a variety of bioactive peptide molecules with marketable nutraceutical and potential pharmaceutical properties. Notable biological activities of microalgal‐derived compounds include antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitic, angiotensin I‐converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE‐inhibitory), anti‐proliferative, anti‐elastase, anti‐trypsin, anti‐chymotrypsin, myofibroblast differentiation inducing and hepatic fibrosis inhibitory activities. The global demand for microalgal research is largely drawn towards the production of alternative biofuels. However, several decades of research on the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical benefits of microalgae, combined with the present interest for alternate biofuels production, have revolutionized the concept of microalgal biorefining. One over‐riding attribute of microalgae is that they have high growth rates compared to terrestrial plants, and may be cultivated photoautotrophically, with meagre amounts of inorganic nutrients. Microalgae cultivation systems may also be based on non‐arable land and use non‐potable water, brackish water, sea water, and even industrial waste water carrying CO2. Better utilization of such underused and widely available resources is one approach to a microalgal bio‐refinery process, which conceptually offers an economically attractive and potentially environmentally sustainable means towards the production of microalgal‐derived nutraceuticals. This chapter presents the past, current and future developments of microalgal‐derived nutraceuticals, with particular emphasis on their type, source and application in food and other industrial sectors.

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May 2015
4 Reads

Cyanobacterial UV-screening compounds are safe alternative for cosmetics and pharmaceutical applications. Irish Chemical News.

Authors:
Saha S.K.

2014, issue 2 | P a g e | 18-19

IRISH CHEMICAL NEWS

Cyanobacteria (aka blue-green algae) are the pioneer prokaryotic oxygenic phototrophs on earth, which evolved on this planet ca 3.5 billion years ago. They occupy a central position in global nutrient cycling, particularly due to their inherent capacity to fix atmospheric CO2 and N2 through Rubisco and nitrogenase enzymes, respectively. They are the inventors of oxygenic photosynthesis and contribute significantly in the biosphere through nitrogen and carbon cycles. Morphologically, they are diverse ranging from unicellular to multicellular; autotrophic to heterotrophic in their mode of nutrition. They survive as psychrophilic to thermophilic, acidophilic to alkylophilic, planktonic to barophilic, and freshwater to marine organisms. They thrive in harsh environments (UV-irradiance, photooxidation, drought and desiccation, nitrogen starvation, heat-cold shocks, anaerobiosis, osmotic and salinity stresses) due to their wide survival strategies (Sinha and Häder, 1996; Saha et al., 2003). UV-irradiance is the major threat to the all living organisms on Earth including human beings. This is because of the fact that the increasing use of anthropogenic environmental hazards such as chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons and organobromides, which are causing the depletion of protective ozone layers. Therefore, all living organisms are exposed to increased amount of harmful UV-A (315-400 nm) and UV-B (280-315 nm) irradiations. Ultraviolet rays are harmful to living systems as these rays produce free radicals that damage cellular components including lipids, proteins and DNA. Cyanobacteria deal with UV exposure by biosynthesising UV-screening compounds, namely, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin pigments. Therefore, cyanobacteria are considered as potentially useful organisms for mankind in various ways including safe natural alternative for bio-cosmetics and biopharmaceutical applications.

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December 2014
6 Reads

Cyanobacteria as bio-factories for production of UV-screening compounds

OA Biotechnology

There is a growing demand for the replacement of chemical sunscreens with bio-sunscreens. Production of bio-sunscreen alone requires an alternative source of UV-screening compounds than the existing wild source. At present, bio-sunscreen compounds are sourced from marine macroalgae containing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) such as, palythine, porphyra-334 and shinorine. Importantly, cyanobacteria being the most successful prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms in various extreme environments can produce palythine, porphyra-334, shinorine and other types of MAAs with multiple bio-functions. Some cyanobacteria additionally produce special type of pigments embedded within their extracellular sheaths for their cellular protection from ultraviolet light damage. Cyanobacteria can be cultivated in a sustainable manner for the production of desired UV-screening compounds using their photosynthetic machinery, meagre amounts of nutrients, sunlight or artificial lights; atmospheric or industrial-waste CO2 and marine water. This alternative bio-factory does not depend on the local weather nor supports un-sustainable harvesting of biomaterials from the wild. The tools required for cyanobacterial genetic manipulations are well developed and more than 50 cyanobacterial genome sequences are available in the public domain, which allows further genetic improvement of cyanobacteria through comparative gene distribution and synteny analysis. Therefore, cyanobacteria can be considered as novel alternative bio-factories for the production of UV-screening compounds. This review briefly discusses the types of UV-screening compounds of cyanobacteria and their usefulness as bio-factories for alternative source of UV-screening compounds production.

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March 2014
12 Reads

Microalgae and cyanobacterial feedstocks for multiple commodities.

Authors:
Saha S.K.

ISBN: 978-1-62948-156-2

Feedstocks: production practices, technologies and environmental impacts, Nova Publishers

The present review provides an overview of microalgae (unless specified, including cyanobacteria) as feedstocks for multiple commodities. The depletion of fossil fuel and the increasing demand for global energy consumption has twisted microalgal research worldwide for the alternate biofuels production. Earlier, microalgal research were mainly focused on basic biochemical characterization and screening for bioactive compounds. Several decades of basic research that helped identifying specific microalgae with highest lipid content and value-added biomolecules and the present demand for alternate biofuel have evolved the microalgal biorefinery concept. The complete exploration of this concept would be economically effective and environmentally sustainable. This is because of the fact that microalgal biomass can be suitable feedstock for bio-diesel, bio-ethanol, bio-methane, bio-hydrogen, animal-feed, aquaculture-feed, bio-fertilizer and value-added biomolecules [anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-oxidants (astaxanthin, B-carotene, lutein, mycosporine-like amino acids), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), biocolorants, UV-screening compounds, etc.] with pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical applications. Further, the microalgal biomass production can aid in recycling environmental and industrial CO2 and in wastewater treatment. Several important steps in microalgal feedstock production for multiple commodities include: 1) selection of appropriate microalgal strain with maximum downstream commodities, 2) growth and mass-culture optimization, 3) harvesting of biomass, 4) sequential extraction of biomolecules and 5) utilization of spent biomass as specific feedstock using suitable technology. This review highlights the important microalgal resources and present status of microalgal biorefinery with special emphasis on integrated processes and expected multiple commodities. This review highlights the challenges at present and future prospects for sustainable exploration of microalgal feedstocks.

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December 2013
2 Reads

Effect of macro- and micro-nutrient limitation on superoxide dismutase activities and carotenoid levels in microalga Dunaliella salina CCAP 19/18.

Bioresour Technol 2013 Nov 9;147:23-8. Epub 2013 Aug 9.

Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2013.08.022DOI Listing
November 2013
5 Reads
2 Citations
4.494 Impact Factor

Tagging of biomolecules with deuterated water (D2O) in commercially important microalgae.

Biotechnol Lett 2013 Jul 12;35(7):1067-72. Epub 2013 Mar 12.

Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-013-1176-8DOI Listing
July 2013
16 Reads
2 Citations
1.591 Impact Factor

Effect of various stress-regulatory factors on biomass and lipid production in microalga Haematococcus pluvialis.

Bioresour Technol 2013 Jan 23;128:118-24. Epub 2012 Oct 23.

Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.10.049DOI Listing
January 2013
6 Reads
5 Citations
4.494 Impact Factor

Overexpression of pknE blocks heterocyst development in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

Journal of Bacteriology

The upstream intergenic regions for each of four genes encoding Ser/Thr kinases, all2334, pknE (alr3732), all4668, and all4838, were fused to a gfpmut2 reporter gene to determine their expression during heterocyst development in the cyanobacterium Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. strain PCC 7120. P(pknE)-gfp was upregulated after nitrogen step-down and showed strong expression in differentiating cells. Developmental regulation of pknE required a 118-bp upstream region and was abolished in a hetR mutant. A pknE mutant strain had shorter filaments with slightly higher heterocyst frequency than did the wild type. Overexpression of pknE from its native promoter inhibited heterocyst development in the wild type and in four mutant backgrounds that overproduce heterocysts. Overexpression of pknE from the copper-inducible petE promoter did not completely inhibit heterocyst development but caused a 24-h delay in heterocyst differentiation and cell bleaching 4 to 5 days after nitrogen step-down. Strains overexpressing pknE and containing P(hetR)-gfp or P(patS)-gfp reporters failed to show developmental regulation of the reporters and had undetectable levels of HetR protein. Genetic epistasis experiments suggest that overexpression of pknE blocks HetR activity or downstream regulation.

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March 2011
6 Reads

The sigE gene is required for normal expression of heterocyst-specific genes in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

Journal of Bacteriology

The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. strain PCC 7120 produces specialized cells for nitrogen fixation called heterocysts. Previous work showed that the group 2 sigma factor sigE (alr4249; previously called sigF) is upregulated in differentiating heterocysts 16 h after nitrogen step-down. We now show that the sigE gene is required for normal heterocyst development and normal expression levels of several heterocyst-specific genes. Mobility shift assays showed that the transcription factor NtcA binds to sites in the upstream region of sigE and that this binding is enhanced by 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). Deletions of the region containing the NtcA binding sites in P(sigE)-gfp reporter plasmids showed that the sites contribute to normal developmental regulation but are not essential for upregulation in heterocysts. Northern RNA blot analysis of nifH mRNA revealed delayed and reduced transcript levels during heterocyst differentiation in a sigE mutant background. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses of the sigE mutant showed lower levels of transcripts for nifH, fdxH, and hglE2 but normal levels for hupL. We developed a P(nifHD)-gfp reporter construct that showed strong heterocyst-specific expression. Time-lapse microscopy of the P(nifHD)-gfp reporter in a sigE mutant background showed delayed development and undetectable green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence. Overexpression of sigE caused accelerated heterocyst development, an increased heterocyst frequency, and premature expression of GFP fluorescence from the P(nifHD)-gfp reporter.

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February 2011
19 Reads

Ligninolytic and antioxidative enzymes of a marine cyanobacterium Oscillatoria willei BDU 130511 during Poly R-478 decolourization.

Bioresour Technol 2010 May 12;101(9):3076-84. Epub 2010 Jan 12.

National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2009.12.075DOI Listing
May 2010
2 Reads
4.494 Impact Factor

Laccase and polyphenol oxidase activities of marine cyanobacteria: a study with Poly R-478 decolourization

World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

The various marine cyanobacterial strains tested showed wide variation in growth patterns and decolourization patterns of the lignin model polymeric dye Poly R-478. The study revealed the presence of laccases (LACs) and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) in marine cyanobacteria. All the ten tested strains were found to possess constitutive PPOs, whereas only four strains showed the presence of constitutive laccases. Within 7 days of incubation the highest percentage of decolourization was shown by Phormidium valderianum BDU140441 (65%), and Oscillatoria chlorina BDU 140691 (12%) showed the least. Isoforms of LACs were found to be induced by the laccase elicitors veratryl aldehyde, caffeic acid, guaiacol and tannic acid. Cyanobacterial strains that possess both LACs and PPOs were relatively more efficient in decolourizing the dye. Altering the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulphur from the basal medium influenced the efficiency of dye decolourization.

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January 2010
6 Reads

Biodiversity of epilithic cyanobacteria from freshwater streams of Kakoijana reserve forest, Assam, India.

Indian J Microbiol 2007 Sep 4;47(3):219-32. Epub 2007 Oct 4.

Department of Microbiology and National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, 620 024 TN India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12088-007-0043-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3450348PMC
September 2007
2 Reads
1 Citation
0.900 Impact Factor

An Improved Method for Marine Cyanobacterial DNA Isolation

World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

The method of Bolch, Blackburn, Jones, Orr & Grewe [Phycologia, 36, 6 11, 1997] developed for isolation of DNA from freshwater cyanobacteria was suitably modified to yield a simple, efficient and reproducible protocol for the isolation of DNA from different morphological types of marine cyanobacteria. This method resulted in a high yield of quality DNA suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications.

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January 2005
5 Reads

Cyanobacteria-dominated biofilms: a high quality food resource for intertidal grazers

Hydrobiologia

Hong Kong rocky shores are dominated by cyanobacterial biofilms composed of a diversity of species. Thirteen common species, belonging to seven genera, were isolated in pure culture in MN+ and MN– media under defined growth conditions from a semi-exposed shore in Hong Kong. The nutritional values (i.e., protein, carbohydrate and calorific value) of these 13 species were determined. All species showed high nutritional quality in terms of protein, carbohydrate and calorific value, however, overall nutritional value varied between the species. Species of Spirulina and Phormidium were most nutritious (highest nutritional values) whereas species of Calothrix and Lyngbya were the least nutritious. Microphagous molluscan grazer density and diversity were relatively high at the study site, despite the seemingly low biomass (as assessed by chlorophyll a concentration) of the biofilm. It is suggested that the high nutritional quality of cyanobacteria, together with their fast turnover rates can support high levels of secondary production (biomass of grazers). The high nutritional quality of cyanobacteria on tropical, cyanobacteria-dominated, rocky shores is therefore of great importance in the benthic food web.

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January 2004
5 Reads

Nitrogen stress induced changes in the marine cyanobacterium Oscillatoria willei BDU 130511.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2003 Aug;45(3):263-72

National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-6496(03)00162-4DOI Listing
August 2003
12 Reads
12 Citations
3.570 Impact Factor

An inexpensive method for denatured and native multigel in a regular vertical slab gel system

Current Science

In this technique, the number of gels to be accommodated can vary depending on the spacer thickness and width of the lower buffer tank. To cast three gels, four plates, either mini (8 cm × 7 cm) or maxi (16 cm × 14 cm), were assembled, of which three notched plates were in sequence and the fourth was the regular plate. Spacers of 1.5 mm thickness were sandwiched between the plates (Figure 1). The plates were clamped together with metal clips.

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January 2003
3 Reads