Publications by authors named "Susanne Banyai"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Blood fluidity and outcome after femoropopliteal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA): role of plasma viscosity and low platelet count in predicting restenosis.

Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 2005 ;32(2):159-68

Division of Angiology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland.

Rheological abnormalities are well known in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We wanted to determine whether rheological variables are related to restenosis after femoropopliteal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In 114 patients (62 men; median age 70 years) undergoing femoropopliteal PTA for symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) plasma viscosity, red cell aggregation, whole blood viscosity, hematocrit, fibrinogen, platelet count, leukocytes and C-reactive protein were determined the day after the procedure and at 1, 3, and 12 months. The primary endpoint was restenosis >50% documented by duplexsonography up to 12 months. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess the risk of restenosis for postinterventional values of rheological variables. Forty-eight patients (42%) developed restenosis at 12 months. Patients with restenosis had higher baseline plasma viscosity (PV) (medians, 1.71 vs. 1.65 millipascal seconds [mPa.s]; p = 0.04) and lower platelet count (224 vs. 240 x 10(3)/microl; p = 0.03) than patients without restenosis. The hazard ratio (HR; 95% CI) of incident restenosis was 9.2 (1.12-76; p = 0.03) for PV and 0.99 (0.99-1.0; p = 0.07) for PLT. When examining jointly both high PV and low platelet count (PLT), patients with PV > 1.66 mPa.s and PLT < 233 x 10(3)/microl (i.e. variables split at their respective median) had an increased risk of restenosis (log-rank test p = 0.01). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that plasma viscosity (p = 0.02), low platelet count (p = 0.01), lesion length (p = 0.0037) and lack of hypertension (p = 0.01) were associated with restenosis at 12 months. No associations were found between restenosis and the other rheological and inflammatory variables studied. Our data suggest that increased PV and low PLT contribute to restenosis after femoropopliteal PTA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2005

Blood rheology in deep venous thrombosis--relation to persistent and transient risk factors.

Thromb Res 2002 Aug;107(3-4):101-7

Division of Angiology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich, Switzerland.

Introduction: The risk of recurrence in patients with symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is higher in patients with persistent risk factors than in patients with transient risk factors. The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the course of rheological variables in patients with DVT up to 1 year after the acute event in relation to risk factors.

Patients And Methods: In 37 patients with proven DVT plasma fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, red cell aggregation, whole blood viscosity, hematocrit and platelet aggregation were studied in the acute phase, at 6 weeks and at 12 months.

Results: In the acute phase, patients had higher fibrinogen (medians and ranges; 450 [270-611] vs. 247 [170-340] mg/dl, p < 0.01), plasma viscosity (1.67 [1.48-1.96] vs. 1.60 [1.50-1.70] mPa s, p < 0.01), red cell aggregation (9.76 [5.87-12.66] vs. 5.66 [3.67-8.46] arbitrary units; p < 0.01) and whole blood viscosity (5.78 [5.61-5.87] vs. 5.59 [5.27-5.9] mPa s, p < 0.01), but lower hematocrit (40 [32-46] vs. 45 [38-50]%, p < 0.01) and platelet aggregation (by epinephrine: 41 [13-85] vs. 79 [29-91]%, (p < 0.01) than controls. During the 1-year follow-up, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, red cell aggregation and whole blood viscosity constantly decreased, whereas hematocrit and platelet aggregation increased in the total of patients (all p < 0.01). Subgroup analysis according to risk factors showed that at 12 months patients with persistent risk factors (N = 21) had higher plasma fibrinogen (357 [235-450] vs. 247 [214-335] mg/dl, p < 0.01), plasma viscosity (1.65 [1.50-1.80] vs. 1.59 [1.42-1.77] mPa s, p < 0.05) and red cell aggregation (7.82 [6.0-11.3] vs. 6.3 [5.2-7.1] arb. units, p < 0.01) than patients with transient risk factors (N = 16). Compared with controls, these variables were increased in patients with persistent risk factors (all p < 0.01), but not in patients with transient risk factors (all n.s.).

Conclusion: In patients with persistent risk factors rheological changes are still present 1 year after acute DVT, whereas in patients with transient risk factors blood rheology returns to normal. Further studies are needed to clarify whether blood rheology might be helpful to identify patients at high risk of recurrence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(02)00302-xDOI Listing
August 2002
-->