Publications by authors named "Susan Boulton"

5 Publications

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Complementary and integrative health interventions and their association with health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population.

Complement Ther Clin Pract 2019 Aug 18;36:43-48. Epub 2019 May 18.

Department of Neurosurgery, The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC Box 3624, Durham, NC, 27710, USA. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: Little is known about complementary and integrative health intervention usage in the primary brain tumor population. We aimed to identify the percentage of patients using these practices and explore the impact on quality of life.

Materials And Methods: Clinical records from patients seen in clinic between December 16, 2013 and February 28, 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The questionnaires used were a modified version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- Brain Cancer and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Fatigue.

Results: 76% of patients utilized a complementary and integrative health modality. The most frequently reported modalities used were vitamins, massage, and spiritual healing, prayer, diet and meditation.

Conclusion: These results confirm the usage of complementary and integrative health practices within the primary brain tumor population; however, there was no evidence of association between use and quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2019.05.002DOI Listing
August 2019

A cross sectional analysis from a single institution's experience of psychosocial distress and health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population.

J Neurooncol 2017 Sep 1;134(2):363-369. Epub 2017 Jul 1.

Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 27710, USA.

Primary brain tumor patients experience high levels of distress. The purpose of this cross-sectional, retrospective study is to evaluate the level and different sources of psychosocial distress and how these pertain to health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Primary and Recurrent Glioma registry at Duke's The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center was queried retrospectively for demographic and clinical information on patients seen between December 2013 and February 2014. Data also included the National Comprehensive Cancer Network's Distress Thermometer (NCCN-DT), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain Cancer (FACT-Br), and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Fatigue (FACIT-F). 829 subjects completed questionnaires. 54% were male; 96% completed the NCCN-DT; 33.3% had a DT score ≥4 (moderate/severe distress). Women reported DT ≥ 4 more often than men (38.6 vs 29.0%; p = 0.005). Patients within 1 year of diagnosis reported DT ≥ 4 more often than those 1+ years after diagnosis (38.8 vs 30.9%; p = 0.034). 73.0% reported physical problems; the most frequent being fatigue (43.2%) and memory/concentration (40.9%). 42.0% complained of emotional problems with worry (29.4%) and nervousness (22.4%) being the most common. Patients who reported at least one practical, family, emotional or physical problem had significantly lower HRQoL scores (p < 0.001). Primary brain tumor patients experience memory dysfunction, fatigue, nervousness, worry, and financial concerns, which have a negative effect on the patient's HRQoL. By identifying and addressing these stressors, it may be possible to improve patient HRQoL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11060-017-2535-4DOI Listing
September 2017

Outcome after bevacizumab clinical trial therapy among recurrent grade III malignant glioma patients.

J Neurooncol 2012 Mar 14;107(1):213-21. Epub 2011 Oct 14.

Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave, SW-460F, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Although outcome following bevacizumab among recurrent grade IV malignant glioma patients is documented as poor by several analyses, outcome for recurrent grade III patients following bevacizumab therapy has not been specifically evaluated. We performed a pooled analysis of 96 recurrent grade III malignant glioma patients enrolled on three consecutive phase II bevacizumab salvage trials to evaluate overall outcome following bevacizumab trial discontinuation. Outcome on the three bevacizumab trials, which included similar eligibility, treatment and assessment criteria, was comparable. Forty-nine patients who progressed on bevacizumab trial therapy and remained alive for at least 30 days elected to receive additional therapy. These patients achieved a median PFS-6 and OS of 30.6% (95% CI: 18.4, 43.6) and 10.3 months (95% CI: 5.2, 11.7), respectively. Among patients who continued bevacizumab therapy (n = 23) after study progression, PFS-6 and median OS were 39.1% (95% CI: 19.9, 58.0) and 9.2 months (95% CI: 5.2, 13.6), respectively, compared to 23.1% (95% CI: 9.4, 40.3; P = 0.51) and 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.5, 14.4; P = 0.91) for patients who initiated non-bevacizumab containing therapy (n = 26). Outcome after discontinuation of bevacizumab therapy for recurrent grade III malignant glioma patients is associated with improved outcome compared to historical data for recurrent grade IV malignant glioma patients. Salvage therapies following bevacizumab failure have modest activity for grade III malignant glioma patients that is independent of further bevacizumab continuation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11060-011-0740-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3403724PMC
March 2012

A pilot study: 131I-antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81c6 to deliver a 44-Gy resection cavity boost.

Neuro Oncol 2008 Apr 20;10(2):182-9. Epub 2008 Feb 20.

Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and assess the efficacy and toxicity, among newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients, of administering (131)I-labeled murine antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 ((131)I-81C6) into a surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) to achieve a patient-specific, 44-Gy boost to the 2-cm SCRC margin. A radioactivity dose of (131)I-81C6 calculated to achieve a 44-Gy boost to the SCRC was administered, followed by conventional external beam radiotherapy (XRT) and chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the study: 16 with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 5 with anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty patients received the targeted 44-Gy boost (+/-10%) to the SCRC. Attributable toxicity was mild and limited to reversible grade 3 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia (n = 3; 14%), CNS wound infections (n = 3; 14%), and headache (n = 2; 10%). With a median follow-up of 151 weeks, median overall survival times for all patients and those with GBM are 96.6 and 90.6 weeks, respectively; 87% of GBM patients are alive at 1 year. It is feasible to consistently achieve a 44-Gy boost dose to the SCRC margin with patient-specific dosing of (131)I-81C6. Our study regimen ((131)I-81C6 + XRT + temozolomide) was well tolerated and had encouraging survival. To determine if selection of good-prognosis patients affects outcome associated with this approach, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a trial randomizing newly diagnosed GBM patients to either our study regimen or standard XRT plus temozolomide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/15228517-2007-053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2613820PMC
April 2008

Tumor resection cavity administered iodine-131-labeled antitenascin 81C6 radioimmunotherapy in patients with malignant glioma: neuropathology aspects.

Nucl Med Biol 2007 May 30;34(4):405-13. Epub 2007 Mar 30.

Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Introduction: The neurohistological findings in patients treated with targeted beta emitters such as (131)I are poorly described. We report a histopathologic analysis from patients treated with combined external beam therapy and a brachytherapy consisting of a (131)I-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) injected into surgically created resection cavities during brain tumor resections.

Methods: Directed tissue samples of the cavity walls were obtained because of suspected tumor recurrence from 28 patients. Samples and clinical follow-up were evaluated on all patients (Group A) based on total radiation dose received and a subset of these (n=18; Group B, proximal therapy subset) who had received external beam therapy within
Results: The lesions observed after (131)I-mAb therapy were qualitatively similar to those reported for other types of radiation therapy; however, the high localized dose rate and absorbed doses produced by the short range of (131)I beta particles seem to have resulted in an earlier necrotic reaction in the tumor bed. Among all 28 (Group A) patients, median survival from tissue analysis after mAb therapy depended on histopathology and total radiation absorbed dose. Median survival for patients with tissue classified as proliferative glioma, quiescent glioma and negative for neoplasm were 3.5, 15 and 27.5 months, respectively. Without categorization, total dose was a significant predictor of survival (P<.002) where patients with higher doses had better prognoses. For example, median survival in patients receiving a total radiation dose greater than 86 Gy was 19 months compared with 7 months for those receiving less than 86 Gy.

Conclusions: Histopathologic analysis correlated with prognosis. Among all patients (Group A) there was a significant correlation between biopsy outcome, survival, and total radiation absorbed dose. Among the Group B proximal therapy patients, the neuropathologic changes were qualitatively similar to those described for external beam therapy and interstitial brachytherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2007.01.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1952684PMC
May 2007