Publications by authors named "Supatat Chumnumwat"

5 Publications

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Knowledge, attitude, and practice towards pharmacogenomics among hospital pharmacists in Thailand.

Pharmacogenet Genomics 2020 06;30(4):73-80

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok.

Background And Objectives: Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is the use of human genomic information to avoid toxicity and optimize efficacy of drug therapy in an individual. Hospital pharmacists are the key persons to facilitate the incorporation of PGx into clinical practice. PGx is relatively new to Thai hospital pharmacists. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of Thai hospital pharmacists towards PGx implementation.

Materials And Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey among 600 hospital pharmacists in 21 hospitals across Thailand. The questionnaire consisted of 35 questions using comment boxes, Likert scales, and multiple choice answers.

Results: The response rate was 20.5% (n = 123). Nearly half of the hospital pharmacists (46.3%) had low PGx knowledge score (<5 points), particularly for applied PGx knowledge in clinical situations. Concerns regarding PGx reimbursement, privacy issues, and discrimination were mentioned in this survey. However, most hospital pharmacists had positive attitude towards PGx service. Only 7% of hospital pharmacists had recommended or interpreted PGx tests in the past year. National PGx guidelines and government policies were considered the important factors for PGx implementation. Moreover, the most preferred learning format for PGx education was professional academic conferences.

Conclusion: Hospital pharmacists in Thailand had positive attitude towards PGx, despite limited experience and practice of PGx. PGx education to support an application of PGx knowledge in clinical situations is required. National PGx guidelines and government policies may need to be developed to address the concerns for reimbursement, privacy, and discrimination to ensure successful PGx implementation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FPC.0000000000000399DOI Listing
June 2020

Southeast Asian Pharmacogenomics Research Network (SEAPharm): Current Status and Perspectives.

Public Health Genomics 2019 4;22(3-4):132-139. Epub 2019 Oct 4.

Center for Medical Genomics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand,

Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is increasingly being recognized as a potential tool for improving the efficacy and safety of drug therapy. Therefore, several efforts have been undertaken globally to facilitate the implementation process of PGx into routine clinical practice. Part of these efforts include the formation of PGx working groups working on PGx research, synthesis, and dissemination of PGx data and creation of PGx implementation strategies. In Asia, the Southeast Asian Pharmacogenomics Research Network (SEAPharm) is established to enable and strengthen PGx research among the various PGx communities within but not limited to countries in SEA; with the ultimate goal to support PGx implementation in the region. From the perspective of SEAPharm member countries, there are several key elements essential for PGx implementation at the national level. They include pharmacovigilance database, PGx research, health economics research, dedicated laboratory to support PGx testing for both research and clinical use, structured PGx education, and supportive national health policy. The status of these essential elements is presented here to provide a broad picture of the readiness for PGx implementation among the SEAPharm member countries, and to strengthen the PGx research network and practice in this region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000502916DOI Listing
May 2020

Correlation between antimicrobial consumption and the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae at a university hospital in Thailand.

J Clin Pharm Ther 2019 Apr 21;44(2):292-299. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

What Is Known And Objective: Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are virulent gram-negative bacilli and cause urgent healthcare problems worldwide. One of the main factors leading to the emergence of CRE is antimicrobial consumption. The objective of this study was to assess how closely the rate of antimicrobial consumption and the prevalences of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CR-EC) and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-KP) are correlated.

Methods: A retrospective study was performed at a university hospital in Thailand from January 2013 to September 2016. The prevalence of E coli and K pneumoniae was represented as percentages per species per quarter. The antimicrobial consumption rate per quarter was expressed as the defined daily dose (DDD)/1000 patient-days. Evaluation of the relationships between the rate of antimicrobial consumption and the prevalences of CR-EC and CR-KP was conducted via Pearson's or Spearman's correlation analyses.

Results And Discussion: During the study period, the prevalence of CR-EC and CR-KP was less than 6%; however, significantly increasing prevalences were reported for both CR-EC (r = 0.55, P = 0.03) and CR-KP (r = 0.87, P < 0.01). There was a significant increasing trend in the consumption of meropenem (r = 0.65, P = 0.01), levofloxacin (r = 0.63, P = 0.01), ceftriaxone (r = 0.55, P = 0.03), ertapenem (r = 0.52, P = 0.05) and the carbapenem group (r = 0.64, P = 0.01). A significant correlation was observed between CR-KP prevalence and total carbapenem consumption (r = 0.55, P = 0.04). Moreover, levofloxacin consumption had a significant positive relationship with the prevalence of CR-KP (r = 0.65, P = 0.01). No positive correlation was found with the prevalence of CR-EC.

What Is New And Conclusion: The rate of consumption of levofloxacin and carbapenems was the important key factor correlated with the rate of emergence of CR-KP. This is the first report demonstrating the correlation between levofloxacin consumption and CR-KP prevalence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpt.12791DOI Listing
April 2019

Comparative performance of pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms derived from Caucasian, Asian, and mixed races in Thai population.

Cardiovasc Ther 2018 Apr 3;36(2). Epub 2018 Jan 3.

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Aim: This study was conducted to compare predictive accuracy of the available pharmacogenetics (PGx)-guided warfarin dosing algorithms derived from Caucasian, Asian, and mixed population to identify a suitable algorithm for Thai population.

Methods: Ten warfarin dosing algorithms derived from different population including Caucasian, East Asian, South-East Asian, and mixed races were selected and tested with clinical and genetic data of Thai patients. Comparative performances of these algorithms were tested using mean dose error (MDE) between actual warfarin maintenance dose (AWMD) and predicted dose generated by each dosing algorithm, and percentage of ideal dose prediction (IDP). Sensitivity analysis for predictive accuracy was also conducted by stratifying patients into low (AWMD ≤21 mg/wk), intermediate (AWMD >21 to <49 mg/wk), and high maintenance dose (AWMD ≥49 mg/wk) groups.

Results: Data of 165 patients were included for the analyses. Mean actual warfarin dose of the study population was 25.03 ± 10.53 mg/wk. Large variability of MDE, ranging from -12.11 to 11.24 mg/wk, among algorithms was observed. International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium, Gage et al, and Ohno et al algorithms had comparable performances to Sangviroon et al algorithm, as observed by MDE of <1 mg/wk with percentage of IDP ≥40%. Further sensitivity analyses among patients requiring low and intermediate maintenance doses confirmed such findings with IDP percentage ranging from 37.8% to 59.2%. Among high-dose group, only Ohno et al and Sarapakdi et al algorithms had acceptable performance.

Conclusions: Warfarin PGx-guided dosing algorithms derived from large, mixed population performed comparably to Sangviroon et al algorithm. Certain algorithms should be avoided due to significant dose prediction error.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1755-5922.12315DOI Listing
April 2018

Multisite Investigation of Outcomes With Implementation of CYP2C19 Genotype-Guided Antiplatelet Therapy After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2018 01 1;11(2):181-191. Epub 2017 Nov 1.

Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objectives: This multicenter pragmatic investigation assessed outcomes following clinical implementation of CYP2C19 genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Background: CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles impair clopidogrel effectiveness after PCI.

Methods: After clinical genotyping, each institution recommended alternative antiplatelet therapy (prasugrel, ticagrelor) in PCI patients with a loss-of-function allele. Major adverse cardiovascular events (defined as myocardial infarction, stroke, or death) within 12 months of PCI were compared between patients with a loss-of-function allele prescribed clopidogrel versus alternative therapy. Risk was also compared between patients without a loss-of-function allele and loss-of-function allele carriers prescribed alternative therapy. Cox regression was performed, adjusting for group differences with inverse probability of treatment weights.

Results: Among 1,815 patients, 572 (31.5%) had a loss-of-function allele. The risk for major adverse cardiovascular events was significantly higher in patients with a loss-of-function allele prescribed clopidogrel versus alternative therapy (23.4 vs. 8.7 per 100 patient-years; adjusted hazard ratio: 2.26; 95% confidence interval: 1.18 to 4.32; p = 0.013). Similar results were observed among 1,210 patients with acute coronary syndromes at the time of PCI (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.87; 95% confidence interval: 1.35 to 6.09; p = 0.013). There was no difference in major adverse cardiovascular events between patients without a loss-of-function allele and loss-of-function allele carriers prescribed alternative therapy (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 0.69 to 1.88; p = 0.60).

Conclusions: These data from real-world observations demonstrate a higher risk for cardiovascular events in patients with a CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele if clopidogrel versus alternative therapy is prescribed. A future randomized study of genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy may be of value.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2017.07.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5775044PMC
January 2018
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