Publications by authors named "Suparna Sengupta"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

α-Fodrin in Cytoskeletal Organization and the Activity of Certain Key Microtubule Kinesins.

Genes (Basel) 2021 05 17;12(5). Epub 2021 May 17.

Cancer Research Program, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram 695014, India.

Cortical cytoskeletal proteins are significant in controlling various cellular mechanisms such as migration, cell adhesion, intercellular attachment, cellular signaling, exo- and endocytosis and plasma membrane integrity, stability and flexibility. Our earlier studies involving in vitro and ex vivo approaches led us to identify certain undiscovered characteristics of α-fodrin, a prominent cortical protein. The conventional functions attributed to this protein mainly support the plasma membrane. In the present study, we utilized a global protein expression analysis approach to detect underexplored functions of this protein. We report that downregulation of α-fodrin in glioblastoma cells, U-251 MG, results in upregulation of genes affecting the regulation of the cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis. Interestingly, certain key microtubule kinesins such as KIF23, KIF2B and KIF3C are downregulated upon α-fodrin depletion, as validated by real-time PCR studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12050750DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8156673PMC
May 2021

A Fresh Look at the Structure, Regulation, and Functions of Fodrin.

Mol Cell Biol 2020 08 14;40(17). Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Cancer Research Program-III, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram, India

Fodrin and its erythroid cell-specific isoform spectrin are actin-associated fibrous proteins that play crucial roles in the maintenance of structural integrity in mammalian cells, which is necessary for proper cell function. Normal cell morphology is altered in diseases such as various cancers and certain neuronal disorders. Fodrin and spectrin are two-chain (αβ) molecules that are encoded by paralogous genes and share many features but also demonstrate certain differences. Fodrin (in humans, typically a heterodimer of the products of the SPTAN1 and SPTBN1 genes) is expressed in nearly all cell types and is especially abundant in neuronal tissues, whereas spectrin (in humans, a heterodimer of the products of the SPTA1 and SPTB1 genes) is expressed almost exclusively in erythrocytes. To fulfill a role in such a variety of different cell types, it was anticipated that fodrin would need to be a more versatile scaffold than spectrin. Indeed, as summarized here, domains unique to fodrin and its regulation by Ca, calmodulin, and a variety of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) endow fodrin with additional specific functions. However, how fodrin structural variations and misregulated PTMs may contribute to the etiology of various cancers and neurodegenerative diseases needs to be further investigated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.00133-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7431051PMC
August 2020

α-Fodrin is required for the organization of functional microtubules during mitosis.

Cell Cycle 2019 Oct 27;18(20):2713-2726. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

Cancer Research Program-III, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, University of Kerala , Thiruvananthapuram , India.

The cytoskeleton protein α-fodrin plays a major role in maintaining structural stability of membranes. It was also identified as part of the brain γ-tubulin ring complex, the major microtubule nucleator. Here, we investigated the requirement of α-fodrin for microtubule spindle assembly during mitotic progression. We found that α-fodrin depletion results in abnormal mitosis with uncongressed chromosomes, leading to prolonged activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint and a severe mitotic delay. Further, α-fodrin repression led to the formation of shortened spindles with unstable kinetochore-microtubule attachments. We also found that the mitotic kinesin CENP-E had reduced levels at kinetochores to likely account for the chromosome misalignment defects in α-fodrin-depleted cells. Importantly, we showed these cells to exhibit reduced levels of detyrosinated α-tubulin, which primarily drives CENP-E localization. Since proper microtubule dynamics and chromosome alignment are required for completion of normal mitosis, this study reveals an unforeseen role of α-fodrin in regulating mitotic progression. Future studies on these lines of observations should reveal important mechanistic insight for fodrin's involvement in cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15384101.2019.1656476DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6773225PMC
October 2019

Binding of alpha-fodrin to gamma-tubulin accounts for its role in the inhibition of microtubule nucleation.

FEBS Lett 2019 06 17;593(11):1154-1165. Epub 2019 May 17.

Cancer Research Programme, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum, India.

Non-erythroid spectrin or fodrin is present as part of the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC) in brain tissue and brain derived cells. Here, we show that fodrin, which is otherwise known for providing structural support to the cell membrane, interacts directly with γ-tubulin within the γ-TuRC through a GRIP2-like motif. Turbidometric analysis of microtubule polymerization with nucleation-potent γ-TuRC isolated from HEK-293 cells that lack fodrin and the γ-TuRC from goat brain that contains fodrin shows inefficiency of the latter to promote nucleation. The involvement of fodrin was confirmed by the reduction in the microtubule polymerization efficiency of HEK-293 derived γ-TuRCs upon addition of purified brain fodrin. Thus, the interaction of fodrin with gamma-tubulin is responsible for its inhibitory effect on γ-tubulin mediated microtubule nucleation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.13425DOI Listing
June 2019

ERK mediated upregulation of death receptor 5 overcomes the lack of p53 functionality in the diaminothiazole DAT1 induced apoptosis in colon cancer models: efficiency of DAT1 in Ras-Raf mutated cells.

Mol Cancer 2016 Mar 8;15:22. Epub 2016 Mar 8.

Cancer Research Program - 3, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum, 695014, India.

Background: p53 is a tumour suppressor protein that plays a key role in many steps of apoptosis, and malfunctioning of this transcription factor leads to tumorigenesis. Prognosis of many tumours also depends upon the p53 status. Most of the clinically used anticancer compounds activate p53 dependent pathway of apoptosis and hence require p53 for their mechanism of action. Further, Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK axis is an important signaling pathway activated in many cancers. Dependence of diaminothiazoles, compounds that have gained importance recently due to their anticancer and anti angiogenic activities, were tested in cancer models with varying p53 or Ras/Raf mutational status.

Methods: In this study we have used p53 mutated and knock out colon cancer cells and xenograft tumours to study the role of p53 in apoptosis mediated by diaminothiazoles. Colon cancer cell lines with varying mutational status for Ras or Raf were also used. We have also examined the toxicity and in vivo efficacy of a lead diaminothiazole 4-Amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenylamino)thiazole (DAT1) in colon cancer xenografts.

Results: We have found that DAT1 is active in both in vitro and in vivo models with nonfunctional p53. Earlier studies have shown that extrinsic pathway plays major role in DAT1 mediated apoptosis. In this study, we have found that DAT1 is causing p53 independent upregulation of the death receptor 5 by activating the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway both in wild type and p53 suppressed colon cancer cells. These findings are also confirmed by the in vivo results. Further, DAT1 is more efficient to induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells with mutated Ras or Raf.

Conclusions: Minimal toxicity in both acute and subacute studies along with the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of DAT1 in cancers with both wild type and nonfunctional p53 place it as a highly beneficial candidate for cancer chemotherapy. Besides, efficiency in cancer cells with mutations in the Ras oncoprotein or its downstream kinase Raf raise interest in diaminothiazole class of compounds for further follow-up.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12943-016-0505-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4782294PMC
March 2016

6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death.

PLoS One 2015 10;10(9):e0137614. Epub 2015 Sep 10.

Division of Cancer Research, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram - 695014, India.

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its therapeutic benefit in breast cancer treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0137614PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4565635PMC
May 2016

Diaminothiazoles evade multidrug resistance in cancer cells and xenograft tumour models and develop transient specific resistance: understanding the basis of broad-spectrum versus specific resistance.

Carcinogenesis 2015 Aug 25;36(8):883-93. Epub 2015 May 25.

Division of Cancer Research and Distributed Information Sub-Centre, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum, India and Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Trivandrum, India

Acquired drug resistance poses a challenge in cancer therapy. Drug efflux is the most common mechanism of resistance displayed by hydrophobic drugs beyond a certain size. However, target specific changes and imbalance between the pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins are also found quite often in many tumours. A number of small antimitotic agents show high potential for multidrug resistant tumours, mainly because they are able to evade the efflux pumps. However, these compounds are also likely to suffer from resistance upon prolonged treatment. Thus, it is important to find out agents that are sensitive to resistant tumours and to know the resistance mechanisms against small molecules so that proper combinations can be planned. In this report, we have studied the efficiency of diaminothiazoles, a novel class of tubulin targeting potential anticancer compounds of small size, in multidrug resistant cancer. Studies in model cell lines raised against taxol and the lead diaminothiazole, DAT1 [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenyl amino) thiazole], and the xenograft tumours derived from them, show that diaminothiazoles are highly promising against multidrug resistant cancers. They were able to overcome the expression of efflux protein MDR1 and certain tubulin isotypes, could sensitize improper apoptotic machinery and ablated checkpoint proteins Bub1 and Mad2. Further, we have found that the resistance against microtubule binding compounds with higher size is broad-spectrum and emerges due to multiple factors including overexpression of transmembrane pumps. However, resistance against small molecules is transient, specific and is contributed by target specific changes and variations in apoptotic factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgv072DOI Listing
August 2015

A regioselective multicomponent protocol for the synthesis of novel bioactive 4-hydroxyquinolin-2(1H)-one grafted monospiropyrrolidine and thiapyrrolizidine hybrids.

Mol Divers 2014 May 14;18(2):269-83. Epub 2014 Jan 14.

School of Chemical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, 641046, Tamilnadu, India.

An expedient route toward the synthesis of 4-hydroxyquinolone grafted spiropyrrolidines or pyrrolizidines has been accomplished through 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of various azomethine ylides derived from isatin or acenaphthalene and sarcosine with 4-hydroxyquinolone derivatives as dipolarophile. The regio and stereo chemical outcome of the cycloaddition reaction is ascertained by X-ray crystallographic studies and spectroscopic techniques of the cycloadducts. Furthermore, cytotoxicity evaluation of selected compounds showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation against cervical as well as colon cancer cell lines.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11030-013-9498-yDOI Listing
May 2014

Reversible action of diaminothiazoles in cancer cells is implicated by the induction of a fast conformational change of tubulin and suppression of microtubule dynamics.

Mol Cancer Ther 2014 Jan 5;13(1):179-89. Epub 2013 Nov 5.

Corresponding Author: Suparna Sengupta, Division of Cancer Research, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram 695014, India.

Diaminothiazoles are novel cytotoxic compounds that have shown efficacy toward different cancer cell lines. They show potent antimitotic and antiangiogenic activity upon binding to the colchicine-binding site of tubulin. However, the mechanism of action of diaminothiazoles at the molecular level is not known. Here, we show a reversible binding to tubulin with a fast conformational change that allows the lead diaminothiazole DAT1 [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenyl amino)thiazole] to cause a reversible mitotic block. DAT1 also suppresses microtubule dynamic instability at much lower concentration than its IC(50) value in cancer cells. Both growth and shortening events were reduced by DAT1 in a concentration-dependent way. Colchicine, the long-studied tubulin-binding drug, has previously failed in the treatment of cancer due to its toxicity, even though it generates a strong apoptotic response. The toxicity is attributable to its slow removal from the cell due to irreversible tubulin binding caused by a slow conformational change. DAT1 binds to tubulin at an optimal pH lower than colchicine. Tubulin conformational studies showed that the binding environments of DAT1 and colchicine are different. Molecular dynamic simulations showed a difference in the number of H-bonding interactions that accounts for the different pH optima. This study gives an insight of the action of compounds targeting tubulin's colchicine-binding site, as many such compounds have entered into clinical trials recently.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-13-0479DOI Listing
January 2014

Fodrin in centrosomes: implication of a role of fodrin in the transport of gamma-tubulin complex in brain.

PLoS One 2013 1;8(10):e76613. Epub 2013 Oct 1.

Cancer Research Programme III, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvanantha-puram, Kerala, India.

Gamma-tubulin is the major protein involved in the nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes in eukaryotic cells. It is present in both cytoplasm and centrosome. However, before centrosome maturation prior to mitosis, gamma-tubulin concentration increases dramatically in the centrosome, the mechanism of which is not known. Earlier it was reported that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex isolated from goat brain contains non-erythroid spectrin/fodrin. The major role of erythroid spectrin is to help in the membrane organisation and integrity. However, fodrin or non-erythroid spectrin has a distinct pattern of localisation in brain cells and evidently some special functions over its erythroid counterpart. In this study, we show that fodrin and γ-tubulin are present together in both the cytoplasm and centrosomes in all brain cells except differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation studies in purified centrosomes from brain tissue and brain cell lines confirm that fodrin and γ-tubulin interact with each other in centrosomes. Fodrin dissociates from centrosome just after the onset of mitosis, when the concentration of γ-tubulin attains a maximum at centrosomes. Further it is observed that the interaction between fodrin and γ-tubulin in the centrosome is dependent on actin as depolymerisation of microfilaments stops fodrin localization. Image analysis revealed that γ-tubulin concentration also decreased drastically in the centrosome under this condition. This indicates towards a role of fodrin as a regulatory transporter of γ-tubulin to the centrosomes for normal progression of mitosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0076613PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788121PMC
April 2014

Upregulation of DR5 receptor by the diaminothiazole DAT1 [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenyl amino) thiazole] triggers an independent extrinsic pathway of apoptosis in colon cancer cells with compromised pro and antiapoptotic proteins.

Apoptosis 2013 Jun;18(6):713-26

Division of Cancer Research, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum 695014, India.

Mitochondria mediated signalling is the more common way of apoptosis induction exhibited by many chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells. Death receptor mediated signalling for apoptosis in many cells also requires further amplification from the mitochondrial pathway activation through tBid. Thus the potential of most chemotherapeutic agents in tumours with intrinsic apoptosis resistance due to changes in molecules involved in the mitochondrial pathway is limited. Diaminothiazoles were shown earlier to bind to tubulin thereby exhibiting cytotoxicity towards different cancer cells. We observed that the lead diaminothiazole, DAT1 [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenyl amino) thiazole] could induce apoptosis in the colon cancer cell line HCT116 by both pathways. However, in contrast to many other chemotherapeutic agents, DAT1 triggered apoptosis where the intrinsic pathway was blocked by changing the pro and antiapoptotic proteins. An independent extrinsic pathway activation triggered by the upregulation of DR5 receptor accounted for that. The induction of DR5 occurred in the transcriptional level and the essential role of DR5 was confirmed by the fact that siRNA downregulation of DR5 significantly reduced DAT1 induced apoptosis. HCT116 cells were earlier shown to have a type II response for apoptosis induction where extrinsic pathway was connected to the intrinsic pathway via the mediator protein tBid. Our finding thus indicates that the signalling events in the manifestation of apoptosis depend not only on the cancer cell type, but also on the inducer. Our results also place diaminothiazoles in a promising position in the treatment of tumours with compromised apoptotic factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10495-013-0826-6DOI Listing
June 2013

Diaminothiazoles inhibit angiogenesis efficiently by suppressing Akt phosphorylation.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2012 Jun 13;341(3):718-24. Epub 2012 Mar 13.

Division of Cancer Research, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram 695014, India.

The prevention of neovessel formation or angiogenesis is a recent popular strategy for limiting and curing cancer. Diaminothiazoles are a class of compounds that have been reported to show promise in the treatment of cancer by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis, because of their effects on microtubules and as inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases. Many microtubule-targeting agents are being studied for their antiangiogenic activity, and a few have shown promising activity in the treatment of cancer. Here, we report that diaminothiazoles can be highly effective as antiangiogenic agents, as observed in the chick membrane assay. The lead compound, 4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)thiazole (DAT1), inhibits endothelial cell processes such as invasion, migration, and tubule formation, which require a functional cytoskeleton. DAT1 also decreases the expression of cell adhesion markers. The antiangiogenic activities of DAT1 occur at concentrations that are not cytotoxic to the normal endothelium. Analysis of intracellular signaling pathways shows that DAT1 inhibits Akt phosphorylation, which is actively involved in the angiogenic process. The antiangiogenic properties of diaminothiazoles, in addition to their promising antimitotic and cytotoxic properties in cancer cell lines, give them an extra advantage in the treatment of cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.112.192559DOI Listing
June 2012

Cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex from brain contains nonerythroid spectrin.

J Cell Biochem 2010 Aug;110(6):1334-41

Cytoskeleton Research Laboratory, Division of Cancer Research, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum 695014, India.

The newer member of the tubulin superfamily, gamma-tubulin, is known to mediate microtubule nucleation from the centrosome of eukaryotic cells with the aid of some other proteins. The major amount of gamma-tubulin is believed to be located in the centrosome before the onset of mitotic division. However, a considerable amount has been found in the cytoplasm in the form of a complex whose function is not well known. Microtubules are most abundant in brain tissues and brain microtubules have been extensively used in many in vitro studies. Thus, it is relevant to use brain tissue to characterize cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex. Here we show that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin in brain tissues exists as a ring complex as in other tissues. Interestingly, along with the common members of the gamma-TuRC reported from several tissues and species, the purified brain cytoplasmic complex contains some high molecular weight proteins including alpha and beta nonerythroid spectrin which are not found in other tissues. Immunohistochemical studies of brain tissue sections also show the co-localization of gamma-tubulin and spectrin. The possible implications have been discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.22647DOI Listing
August 2010

Drug target interaction of tubulin-binding drugs in cancer therapy.

Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2006 Oct;6(10):1433-47

Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Cancer Biology Division, Poojappura, Trivandrum 695014, India.

Microtubules and their component protein, tubulin, constitute a popular target for the treatment of cancer. Many drugs that are presently used in clinics or in clinical trials and drugs that show promise as anticancer drugs bind to tubulin and microtubules. There are three conventional binding sites on beta-tubulin where many of these drugs bind. The binding properties, conformational changes upon binding, association constants and thermodynamic parameters for the drug-tubulin interaction on these three sites are discussed. The antiproliferative activities of these drugs and the possible correlation with the binding properties are also described.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/14737140.6.10.1433DOI Listing
October 2006

4-Amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)thiazole (DAT1): a cytotoxic agent towards cancer cells and a probe for tubulin-microtubule system.

Br J Pharmacol 2005 Aug;145(8):1076-83

Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum 695014, India.

Microtubule binding drugs are of special interest as they have important roles in the modulation of cellular functions and many of them act as anticancer agents. 4-Amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)thiazole (DAT1) was identified as one of the active compounds from a series of diaminoketothiazoles in a cell-based screening assay to discover cytotoxic compounds. DAT1 shows cytotoxicity with GI(50) values ranging from 0.05 to 1 microM in different malignant cell lines with an average value of 0.35 microM. It blocks mitosis in the prometaphase and metaphase stages. In HeLa cells, DAT1 blocks the spindle function by disturbing spindle microtubule and chromosome organization. The drug also inhibits assembly of brain microtubules and binds tubulin specifically at a single site with induction of fluorescence. The dissociation constant of DAT1 binding to tubulin was determined as 2.9+/-1 microM at 24 degrees C. The binding site of DAT1 on tubulin overlaps with that of the conventional colchicine-binding site. DAT1 can thus be considered as a lead compound of a new class of small molecules and this study can be used as a step to develop potent antimitotic agents for the control of cytoskeletal functions and cell proliferation. It would also be an interesting probe for the structure-function studies of tubulin-microtubule system.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjp.0706276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1576226PMC
August 2005

-NH-dansyl isocolchicine exhibits a significantly improved tubulin-binding affinity and microtubule inhibition in comparison to isocolchicine by binding tubulin through its A and B rings.

Biochemistry 2005 Mar;44(9):3249-58

Department of Biochemistry, Bose Institute, Calcutta 700054, India.

Structure-activity relationship studies have established that the A and C rings of colchicine comprise the minimum structural feature necessary for high affinity drug-tubulin binding. Thus, colchicine acts as a bifunctional ligand by making two points of attachment to the protein. Furthermore, analogues belonging to the iso series of colchicine are virtually inactive in binding to tubulin and inhibiting microtubule assembly. In the present study, we found that the substitution of a hydrophobic dansyl group on the B-ring side chain (C7 position) of isocolchicine reverses the structural alterations at the C ring and the newly synthesized -NH-dansyl isocolchicine restores the lost biological activity of the compound. It inhibits microtubule assembly efficiently with an IC(50) value of 10 microM and competes with [(3)H]colchicine for binding to tubulin. Moreover, although -NH-dansyl colchicine binding to tubulin involves two steps, the -NH-dansyl isocolchicine-tubulin interaction has been found to occur via a one-step process. Also, the affinity constant of the -NH-dansyl isocolchicine-tubulin interaction is roughly only 3 times lower than that of the -NH-dansyl colchicine-tubulin interaction. These results suggest that the enhanced microtubule inhibitory ability of -NH-dansyl isocolchicine is therefore related to the affinity of the drug-tubulin interaction and not to any conformational changes upon binding tubulin. We also observed that the competition of -NH-dansyl isocolchicine with [(3)H]colchicine for binding to tubulin was dependent on the tubulin concentration. In conclusion, this paper for the first time indicates that a biologically active bifuntional colchicine analogue can be designed where the drug binds tubulin through its A and B rings, while the C ring remains inactive.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bi048211uDOI Listing
March 2005
-->