Publications by authors named "Sunil Kumar S"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of Updated 2016 ASE/EACVI VIS-À-VIS 2009 ASE Recommendation on the Prevalence of Diastolic Dysfunction and LV Filling Pressures in Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

J Cardiovasc Imaging 2021 Jan;29(1):31-43

Department of Community Medicine, JSS Medical College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, India.

Background: Assessment of diastolic dysfunction (DD) and left ventricular filling pressures (LVFP) by echocardiography is complex in patients with preserved ejection fraction (EF). The American Society of Echocardiography and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASE/EACVI) jointly published recommendations in 2016 to simplify the diagnosis and classification of DD and the assessment of LVFP. We aimed to study the impact of the updated 2016 ASE/EACVI guidelines vis-à-vis the 2009 ASE recommendations on prevalence of DD and LVFP in patients with preserved EF.

Methods: Five hundred patients referred to the echocardiography laboratory from March 2020 to May 2020 were analyzed. Patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 50% were excluded. All patients underwent comprehensive transthoracic echocardiography. DD and LVFP were assessed by the 2016 ASE/EACVI and 2009 ASE recommendations. The concordance between the guidelines was analyzed by kappa coefficient and overall proportion of agreement.

Results: Mean age was 53 ± 13 years and 63.4% were men. Prevalence of DD and abnormal LVFP were significantly lower with the 2016 recommendations than with the 2009 recommendations (9.4% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001 and 8.4% vs. 12.8%, p < 0.05). Patients with Grade 1 DD (100%) and Grade 2 DD (46.4%) were reclassified by the 2016 recommendations. Indeterminate diastolic function (9.8%) was strikingly high according to the 2016 recommendations. The concordance between the two recommendations was moderate (kappa = 0.569). The overall proportion of agreement was 85.4%.

Conclusions: Prevalence of DD and abnormal LV filling pressures were lower with application of the 2016 ASE/EACVI recommendations in patients with preserved EF. There was moderate agreement between the 2009 and 2016 recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4250/jcvi.2020.0117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7847794PMC
January 2021

Gluten hydrolyzing activity of Bacillus spp isolated from sourdough.

Microb Cell Fact 2020 Jun 12;19(1):130. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

SDM Research Institute for Biomedical Sciences (SDMRIBS), Shri Dharmasthala Manjunatheshwara University, Manjushree Nagar, Dharwad, Karnataka, 580 009, India.

Background: Celiac disease is an intestinal chronic disorder with multifactorial etiology resulting in small intestinal mucosal injuries and malabsorption. In genetically predisposed individuals with HLA DQ2/DQ8 molecules, the gluten domains rich in glutamine and proline present gluten domains to gluten reactive CD4 T cells causing injury to the intestine. In the present experimental design, the indigenous bacteria from wheat samples were studied for their gluten hydrolyzing functionality.

Results: Proteolytic activity of Bacillus spp. was confirmed spectrophotometrically and studied extensively on gliadin-derived synthetic enzymatic substrates, natural gliadin mixture, and synthetic highly immunogenic 33-mer peptide. The degradation of 33-mer peptide and the cleavage specificities of the selected isolates were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. The gluten content of the sourdough fermented by the chosen bacterial isolates was determined by R5 antibody based competitive ELISA. All the tested isolates efficiently hydrolyzed Z-YPQ-pNA, Z-QQP-pNA, Z-PPF-pNA, and Z-PFP-pNA and also cleaved 33-mer immunogenic peptide extensively. The gluten content of wheat sourdough was found to be below 110 mg/kg.

Conclusion: It has been inferred that four Bacillus spp especially GS 188 could be useful in developing gluten-reduced wheat food product for celiac disease prone individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12934-020-01388-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7291523PMC
June 2020

Evaluation for airway obstruction in adult patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

Indian Heart J 2018 Mar - Apr;70(2):266-271. Epub 2017 Aug 16.

JSS Medical College, JSS University, Mysore, India. Electronic address:

Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) and chronic airway disease (COPD and Asthma) are major epidemics accounting for significant mortality and morbidity. The combination presents many diagnostic challenges. Clinical symptoms and signs frequently overlap. There is a need for airway evaluation in these patients to plan appropriate management.

Methods: Consecutive stable IHD patients attending the cardiology OPD in a tertiary care centre were interviewed for collecting basic demographic information, brief medical, occupational, personal history and risk factors for coronary artery disease and airway disease, modified medical research centre (MMRC) grade for dyspnea, quality of life-St. George respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ), spirometry and six-min walk tests. Patients with chronic airway obstruction were treated as per guidelines and were followed up at 3rd month with spirometry, six-minute walk test and SGRQ.

Results: One hundred fourteen consecutive patients with stable cardiac disease were included (Males-88, Females-26). Mean age was 58.89±12.24years, 53.50% were smokers, 31.56% were alcoholics, 40.35% diabetics, 47.36% hypertensive. Twenty five patients had airway obstruction on spirometry (COPD-13 and Asthma-12) and none were on treatment. Thirty-one patients had cough and 48 patients had dyspnea. Patients with abnormal spirometry had higher symptoms, lower exercise tolerance and quality of life. Treatment with appropriate respiratory medications resulted in increase in lung function, quality of life and exercise tolerance at 3rd month.

Conclusion: Chronic respiratory disease in patients with stable IHD is frequent but often missed due to overlap of symptoms. Spirometry is a simple tool to recognize the underlying pulmonary condition and patients respond favorably with appropriate treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2017.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5993984PMC
August 2018

Radiative Rotational Lifetimes and State-Resolved Relative Detachment Cross Sections from Photodetachment Thermometry of Molecular Anions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring.

Phys Rev Lett 2017 Jul 14;119(2):023202. Epub 2017 Jul 14.

Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany.

Photodetachment thermometry on a beam of OH^{-} in a cryogenic storage ring cooled to below 10 K is carried out using two-dimensional frequency- and time-dependent photodetachment spectroscopy over 20 min of ion storage. In equilibrium with the low-level blackbody field, we find an effective radiative temperature near 15 K with about 90% of all ions in the rotational ground state. We measure the J=1 natural lifetime (about 193 s) and determine the OH^{-} rotational transition dipole moment with 1.5% uncertainty. We also measure rotationally dependent relative near-threshold photodetachment cross sections for photodetachment thermometry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.023202DOI Listing
July 2017

The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

Rev Sci Instrum 2016 Jun;87(6):063115

Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.

An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4953888DOI Listing
June 2016

Photodissociation of an Internally Cold Beam of CH^{+} Ions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring.

Phys Rev Lett 2016 Mar 17;116(11):113002. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.

We have studied the photodissociation of CH^{+} in the Cryogenic Storage Ring at ambient temperatures below 10 K. Owing to the extremely high vacuum of the cryogenic environment, we were able to store CH^{+} beams with a kinetic energy of ∼60  keV for several minutes. Using a pulsed laser, we observed Feshbach-type near-threshold photodissociation resonances for the rotational levels J=0-2 of CH^{+}, exclusively. In comparison to updated, state-of-the-art calculations, we find excellent agreement in the relative intensities of the resonances for a given J, and we can extract time-dependent level populations. Thus, we can monitor the spontaneous relaxation of CH^{+} to its lowest rotational states and demonstrate the preparation of an internally cold beam of molecular ions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.113002DOI Listing
March 2016

Ion-Induced Dipole Interactions and Fragmentation Times: Cα-Cβ Chromophore Bond Dissociation Channel.

J Phys Chem Lett 2015 Jun 21;6(11):2070-4. Epub 2015 May 21.

†Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d'Orsay, CNRS UMR 8214, Université Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

The fragmentation times corresponding to the loss of the chromophore (Cα-Cβ bond dissociation channel) after photoexcitation at 263 nm have been investigated for several small peptides containing tryptophan or tyrosine. For tryptophan-containing peptides, the aromatic chromophore is lost as an ionic fragment (m/z 130), and the fragmentation time increases with the mass of the neutral fragment. In contrast, for tyrosine-containing peptides the aromatic chromophore is always lost as a neutral fragment (mass = 107 amu) and the fragmentation time is found to be fast (<20 ns). These different behaviors are explained by the role of the postfragmentation interaction in the complex formed after the Cα-Cβ bond cleavage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b00792DOI Listing
June 2015

A serial echocardiographic study of myocardial abscess in a patient surviving staphylococcal septicemia.

Indian Heart J 2014 Nov-Dec;66(6):743-4. Epub 2014 Dec 19.

Associate Professor, Department of Paediatrics, JSS Medical College & Hospital, Mahatma Gandhi Road, Mysore 570004, India.

2D echocardiography was performed on a 4-year-old child suffering from right thigh abscess due to MRSA infection following diagnosis of pericardial effusion by USG abdomen. It revealed myocardial abscess and pericardial effusion. This child underwent series of 2D echocardiographic studies which showed image appearance of myocardial abscess with its time course of healing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2014.12.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4310954PMC
December 2014

Dosimetry and radiobiological studies of automated alpha-particle irradiator.

J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol 2013 ;32(3):263-73

Mechanical Design and Prototype Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, India.

Understanding the effect of alpha radiation on biological systems is an important component of radiation risk assessment and associated health consequences. However, due to the short path length of alpha radiation in the atmosphere, in vitro radiobiological experiments cannot be performed with accuracy in terms of dose and specified exposure time. The present paper describes the design and dosimetry of an automated alpha-particle irradiator named 'BARC BioAlpha', which is suitable for in vitro radiobiological studies. Compared to alpha irradiators developed in other laboratories, BARC BioAlpha has integrated computer-controlled movement of the alpha-particle source, collimator, and electronic shutter. The diaphragm blades of the electronic shutter can control the area (diameter) of irradiation without any additional shielding, which is suitable for radiobiological bystander studies. To avoid irradiation with incorrect parameters, a software interlock is provided to prevent shutter opening, unless the user-specified speed of the source and collimator are achieved. The dosimetry of the alpha irradiator using CR-39 and silicon surface barrier detectors showed that ~4 MeV energy of the alpha particle reached the cells on the irradiation dish. The alpha irradiation was also demonstrated by the evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks in human cells. In conclusion, 'BARC BioAlpha' provides a user-friendly alpha irradiation system for radiobiological experiments with a novel automation mechanism for better accuracy of dose and exposure time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1615/jenvironpatholtoxicoloncol.2013009650DOI Listing
January 2014

Cα-Cβ chromophore bond dissociation in protonated tyrosine-methionine, methionine-tyrosine, tryptophan-methionine, methionine-tryptophan and their sulfoxide analogs.

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2012 Aug 21;14(29):10225-32. Epub 2012 Jun 21.

Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d'Orsay, CNRS UMR 8214, Université Paris Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

C(α)-C(β) chromophore bond dissociation in some selected methionine-containing dipeptides induced by UV photons is investigated. In methionine containing dipeptides with tryptophan as the UV chromophore, the tryptophan side chain is ejected either as an ion or as a neutral fragment while in dipeptides with tyrosine, the tyrosine side chain is lost only as a neutral fragment. Mechanisms responsible for these fragmentations are proposed based on measured branching ratios and fragmentation times, and on the results of DFT/B3-LYP calculations. It appears that the C(α)-C(β) bond cleavage is a non-statistical dissociation for the peptides containing tyrosine, and occurs after internal conversion for those with tryptophan. The proposed mechanisms are governed by the ionization potential of the aromatic side chain compared to that of the rest of the molecule, and by the proton affinity of the aromatic side chain compared to that of the methionine side chain. In tyrosine-containing peptides, the presence of oxygen on sulfur of methionine presumably reduces the ionization potential of the peptide backbone, facilitating the loss of the side chain as a neutral fragment. In tryptophan-containing peptides, the presence of oxygen on methionyl-sulfur expedites the transfer of the proton from the side chain to the sulfoxide, which facilitates the loss of the neutral side chain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c2cp40773fDOI Listing
August 2012

A polyherbal ayurvedic drug--Indukantha Ghritha as an adjuvant to cancer chemotherapy via immunomodulation.

Immunobiology 2008 16;213(8):641-9. Epub 2008 Apr 16.

Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Functional Genomics, Division of Cancer Research, Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, India.

Indukantha Ghritha (IG) is a polyherbal preparation consisting of 17 plant components widely prescribed by ayurvedic physicians for various ailments. Though it is a known ayurvedic drug, no attempt has been made to scientifically validate its mechanism of action. Preliminary studies in our laboratory showed IG to possess considerable immunomodulatory effects with a Th1 type of immune response. In this regard, we attempted to elucidate its role as an adjuvant to cancer chemotherapy. BALB/c mice were administered IG, for a period of 14 days and parameters such as Hb, total and differential WBC count, bone marrow cellularity, lymphocyte proliferation and function, macrophage phagocytosis and tumor remission were studied. Administration of IG could inhibit tumor development in mice challenged with Dalton's lymphoma ascites. IG-induced leukopoiesis and enhanced median survival time as well as life span in tumor bearing animals. Macrophage phagocytic capacity was also elevated. Flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte subsets and MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium salt] assay for lymphocyte proliferation, yielded promising results which reinforces its use as an adjuvant to cancer chemotherapy. The polyherbal drug could reverse cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression in control tumor bearing animals significantly to values near or above normal levels. These results demonstrate the potential of IG, especially in several immunosuppressed conditions and patients suffering from leukopenia as a consequence of cancer chemotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.imbio.2008.02.004DOI Listing
November 2008