Publications by authors named "Sundhar S"

3 Publications

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Dietary intake of trace elements from commercially important fish and shellfish of Thoothukudi along the southeast coast of India and implications for human health risk assessment.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Dec 9;173(Pt A):113020. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Thoothukudi, India.

The concentrations of eight trace elements (chromium, cobalt, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead) in14 commercially important fish and shellfish collected from Thoothukudi along the southeast coast of India was investigated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in order to assess the health risks associated with their consumption. The concentration of trace elements ranged from 0.001 to 39.5 μg/g. The estimated weekly intake of cadmium in seven fish and shellfish (0.0081-0.0996 mg/kg body weight) were above the provisional tolerable weekly intake set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. The risk assessment analysis indicated that there was non- carcinogenic risk upon lifetime consumption of rock crab, C. natator (TTHQ >1) and carcinogenic risks upon lifetime consumption of S. jello, P. semisulcatus, P. sanguinolentus C. natator, Uroteuthis duvaceli, Sepia pharaonis and Cistopus indicus due to cadmium exposure indicating a potential health risk to the exposed consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.113020DOI Listing
December 2021

Risk assessment of organochlorine pesticides in seaweeds along the Gulf of Mannar, Southeast India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 Dec 7;161(Pt B):111709. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Department of Fisheries Economics and Statistics, Faculty of Fishery Science, Kolkata, India.

Bioaccumulation of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in red, green, and brown seaweeds from the Gulf of Mannar was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentration of OCPs in all the seaweeds was in the order of endosulfan > endrin > HCH > DDT > aldrin > heptachlor > methoxychlor. The concentrations of HCH, endrin, endosulfan, and DDT in Sargassum wightii and Gelidiella acerosa, and HCH and endosulfan in Gracilaria verrucosa were above the limits prescribed by the European Commission. However, in Ulva lactuca, except for endosulfan, all other OCPs were below the permissible level. The bioaccumulation of OCPs in seaweeds was in the order of S. wightii > G. acerosa > Gracilaria verrucosa > U. lactuca. The results of comparative analysis of the levels of the investigated pesticides against the standard human health risk assessment revealed that pesticide exposure from seaweeds is hazardous to human health and the marine environment of the Gulf of Mannar.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111709DOI Listing
December 2020

Concentrations of trace elements in the organs of commercially exploited crustaceans and cephalopods caught in the waters of Thoothukudi, South India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 May 11;154:111045. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Thoothukudi, Tamil Nadu, India.

Concentrations of trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, mercury, and lead) in tissues (muscle, gills, and digestive gland) of three commercially exploited crustaceans (Portunus sanguinolentus, Charybdis natator, and Penaeus semisulcatus) and three cephalopods (Doryteuthis sibogae, Sepia pharaonis, and Cistopus indicus) were examined. The animals were captured in the waters of Thoothukudi, and the tissues of six individuals of each species were analyzed using ICP-MS. The highest concentrations of arsenic (16.5 μg/g) and mercury (0.052 μg/g) were recorded in the digestive gland of C. natator, and cadmium (69.9 μg/g) and lead (0.351 μg/g) in the digestive gland of S. pharaonis. The edible portion of the crustaceans and cephalopods contained lower concentrations of trace elements, and these were below allowable limits set by the European Union. The edible parts of the investigated samples are safe for human consumption, but accidental contamination of the edible tissues with material from the digestive glands could lead to concerns relating to metal toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111045DOI Listing
May 2020
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