Publications by authors named "Sudhish Chandra"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Idiopathic congenital nonobstructive nephrolithiasis: a case report and review.

J Perinatol 2004 Mar;24(3):196-9

Neonatal Division, Rainbow Babies and Children Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

We describe a case of congenital nephrolithiasis, which presented with hematuria at birth. No etiopathological factor could be determined for renal stone formation despite extensive investigation. There was a family history of renal stones in both maternal and paternal grandparents and of microscopic hematuria in the mother. There was no associated urinary flow obstruction and the hematuria remitted spontaneously. The infant was treated conservatively. The follow-up studies revealed persistence of renal stone but no hematuria. This case can be considered as idiopathic, or an early presentation of one of the rare genetic disorders associated with renal stones. Congenital nonobstructive nephrolithiasis has not been reported previously and should be considered as a cause of hematuria during this age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.jp.7211026DOI Listing
March 2004

Safety and efficacy of intratracheal recombinant human Clara cell protein in a newborn piglet model of acute lung injury.

Pediatr Res 2003 Oct 18;54(4):509-15. Epub 2003 Jun 18.

Cardiopulmonary Research Institute, Winthrop-University Hospital, SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine, Mineola, New York 11501, USA.

Despite the widespread use of exogenous surfactant, acute and chronic lung injury continues to be a major cause of morbidity in preterm infants. CC10 is a protein produced by Clara cells that inhibits phospholipase A2 and has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties. We studied whether intratracheal (IT) recombinant human Clara cell protein (rhCC10) could safely minimize lung injury in a newborn piglet model of acute lung injury. Twenty-nine newborn piglets were given Survanta and then ventilated for 48 h receiving the following: room air (group 1); 100% O2 (group 2); or 100% O2 and 25, 5, or 1 mg/kg (groups 3, 4, and 5, respectively) of IT rhCC10 (diluted to 2 mL/kg with saline) at time 0. Laboratory studies, oxygen ratios, static pressure-volume curves, bronchoalveolar lavage (for inflammatory markers), and histologic analyses were performed over the 48-h study period. Pulmonary compliance and oxygenation were significantly improved in animals receiving 5 mg/kg IT rhCC10 compared with room air and 100% O2 controls (p < 0.004 and p < 0.05, respectively, ANOVA). Reductions in inflammatory markers were seen in animals receiving rhCC10, although changes did not reach statistical significance. No significant toxicity was noted. rhCC10 appeared safe and improved pulmonary function in this newborn piglet model of hyperoxic lung injury. We speculate that rhCC10 may represent a promising therapy for the prevention of lung injury in preterm infants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/01.PDR.0000081300.49749.87DOI Listing
October 2003

Effectiveness of alternative treatments for reducing potential viral contaminants from plasma-derived products.

Thromb Res 2002 Mar;105(5):391-400

Aventis Behring, King of Prussia, PA, USA.

An issue of great importance and continuing concern with regard to all products derived from human plasma is their safety from potential contaminants in the source material from which they are purified. Since viral contaminants are a major safety consideration with these products, a number of different methods, including dry heating, vapor heating, filtration and nanofiltration, ultraviolet and gamma irradiation, pasteurization, solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment, sodium thiocyanate treatment, and chromatography (immunoaffinity, metal chelation, affinity, and ion exchange), have been developed to remove or inactivate potentially contaminating viruses. Pasteurization and S/D treatment have emerged as the dominant viral inactivation methods. Results summarized in this review demonstrate that pasteurization is the broadest and most rigorous currently available method for removal of potential viral contaminants from plasma-derived products. S/D treatment requires control over a large number of manufacturing parameters and has no ability to inactivate nonlipid-enveloped viruses. Pasteurization requires control over only a small number of manufacturing variables, is easily monitored, and remains effective even if deviations are encountered from specified protein and stabilizer concentrations and temperature. In addition, pasteurization is effective against a wide range of lipid- and nonlipid-enveloped viruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(02)00044-0DOI Listing
March 2002