Publications by authors named "Suchismita Srichandan"

10 Publications

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Responses of phytoplankton community structure and association to variability in environmental drivers in a tropical coastal lagoon.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Apr 1;783:146873. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon 752030, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

Spatial and seasonal heterogeneity in phytoplankton communities are governed by many biotic and abiotic drivers. However, the identification of long-term spatial and temporal trends in abiotic drivers, and their interdependencies with the phytoplankton communities' structure is understudied in tropical brackish coastal lagoons. We examined phytoplankton communities' spatiotemporal dynamics from a 5-year dataset (n = 780) collected from 13 sampling stations in Chilika Lagoon, India, where the salinity gradient defined the spatial patterns in environmental variables. Generalized additive models showed a declining trend in phytoplankton biomass, pH, and dissolved PO in the lagoon. Hierarchical modelling of species communities revealed that salinity (44.48 ± 28.19%), water temperature (4.37 ± 5.65%), and season (4.27 ± 0.96%) accounted for maximum variation in the phytoplankton composition. Bacillariophyta (Indicator Value (IV): 0.74) and Dinophyta (IV: 0.72) emerged as top indicators for polyhaline regime whereas, Cyanophyta (IV: 0.81), Euglenophyta (IV: 0.79), and Chlorophyta (IV: 0.75) were strong indicators for oligohaline regime. The responses of Dinophyta and Chrysophyta to environmental drivers were much more complex as random effects accounted for ~70-75% variation in their abundances. Prorocentrum minimum (IV: 0.52), Gonyaulax sp. (IV: 0.52), and Alexandrium sp. (IV: 0.51) were potential indicators of P-limitation. Diploneis weissflogii (IV: 0.43), a marine diatom, emerged as a potential indicator of N-limitation. Hierarchical modelling revealed the positive association between Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta whereas, Dinophyta and Chrysophyta showed a negative association with Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta. Landsat 8-Operational Land Imager satellite models predicted the highest and lowest Cyanophyta abundances in northern and southern sectors, respectively, which were in accordance with the near-coincident field-based measurements from the lagoon. This study highlighted the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and their relationships with environmental drivers by separating the signals of habitat filtering and biotic interactions in a monsoon-regulated tropical coastal lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146873DOI Listing
April 2021

Effect of Tidal Cycle on Escherichia coli Variability in a Tropical Estuary.

Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 2021 Apr 20;106(4):622-628. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

School of Biotechnology, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology, Bhubaneswar, 751024, India.

A faecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), is widely used in monitoring health of estuaries, where tidal amplitude plays a critical role in its variability. Mahanadi estuary, formed at the mouth of a major tropical river Mahanadi, has large socio-economic importance. This anthropogenically stressed estuary remains understudied with respect to E. coli. Hence, this study addressed E. coli variability in Mahanadi estuary with novel sampling strategy that can be implemented at other tropical estuaries. The sampling strategy includes simultaneous measurements, at lesser-saline upper-estuary and higher-saline lower-estuary, over a tidal cycle. Although no significant variability of E. coli was observed between upper and lower-estuary, overall average count was higher during low tide and lower during high tide attributed to salinity fluctuations. Intermittent surpass of E. coli counts above recommended limits in Mahanadi estuary, indicated potential health risk, thus demands for frequent water quality monitoring and management strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00128-021-03106-wDOI Listing
April 2021

A baseline investigation of phytoplankton pigment composition in contrasting coastal ecosystems of north-western Bay of Bengal.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 Nov 25;160:111708. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

Department of Marine Sciences, Berhampur University, Ganjam 760007, India.

A baseline investigation of the chromatographic characterization of phytoplankton pigments with complementing microscopy was conducted in Mahanadi estuary, Chilika lagoon, and coastal waters off Gopalpur along the east coast of India. Marker pigments specific to different phytoplankton groups have been discerned in these contrasting coastal ecosystems. A total of 16 phytoplankton pigments were identified. Irrespective of seasons, Chilika lagoon was characterized by a high concentration of zeaxanthin, indicating the predominance of picocyanobacteria. Zeaxanthin and fucoxanthin were the major diagnostic pigments in Mahanadi estuary during monsoon and other seasons, respectively. In coastal waters off Gopalpur, algal blooms resulted in a higher concentration of fucoxanthin during pre-monsoon and monsoon season. The pigment ratios were comparatively higher for Chilika lagoon than for Mahanadi estuary and off Gopalpur, irrespective of seasons. The present study highlights the advantages of the chromatography technique in identifying small-sized phytoplankton in coastal ecosystems in comparison to conventional microscopy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111708DOI Listing
November 2020

Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton in response to environmental variables in contrasting coastal ecosystems.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 Apr 2;26(12):12025-12041. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Department of Marine Sciences, Berhampur University, Berhampur, Odisha, 760007, India.

Seasonal distribution of phytoplankton community and size structure was assessed in three different tropical ecosystems of the western Bay of Bengal viz. estuary (Mahanadi), lagoon (Chilika), and coastal waters (off Gopalpur) in response to ambient hydrobiology. Salinity regimes differentiated the study regions as contrasting ecosystems irrespective of seasons (pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon). Taxonomic account revealed a total no of 175, 65, and 101 phytoplankton species in the estuary, lagoon, and coastal waters, respectively. Prevalence of marine, brackish, and fresh water types in the coastal waters, lagoon, and estuary, respectively, characterized the contrasting nature of the study regions in hosting the phytoplankton community. In general, phytoplankton abundance was observed in increasing order of coastal waters > estuary > lagoon during post-monsoon and pre-monsoon, while lagoon > coastal waters > estuary during monsoon. Bacillariophyta dominated the phytoplankton community in the estuary and coastal waters during all the seasons. In contrast, the lagoon exhibited a diverse array of phytoplankton group such as cyanophyta, dinophyta, and bacillariophyta during monsoon, post-monsoon, and pre-monsoon, respectively. Over the seasons, microphytoplankton emerged as the dominant phytoplankton size class in the coastal waters. Diversely, nanophytoplankton contributed to major fraction of chlorophyll-a concentration in the estuary and lagoon. Interestingly, pre-monsoon dinophyta bloom (causative species: Noctiluca scintillans with cell density 9 × 10 cells·l) and monsoon bacillariophyta bloom (causative species: Asterionellopsis glacialis 5.02 × 10 cells·l) resulted decline in species diversity. Multivariate statistical analysis deciphered salinity as a major environmental player in determining the distribution, diversity, and composition of phytoplankton communities in the three contrasting environments. Trophic state indices signified the lagoon and estuary as hypereutrophic during all season. The coastal water was marked as highly eutrophic through trophic state index during monsoon and pre-monsoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-04569-5DOI Listing
April 2019

Environmental dynamics of red Noctiluca scintillans bloom in tropical coastal waters.

Mar Pollut Bull 2016 Oct 19;111(1-2):277-286. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS), Ocean Valley, Pragathi Nagar (BO), Nizampet (SO), Hyderabad 500090.

An intense bloom of red Noctiluca scintillans (NS) occurred off the Rushikulya estuarine region along the east coast of India, an important site for mass nesting events of the vulnerable Olive Ridley sea turtle. At its peak, densities of NS were 3.3×10(5) cells-l(-1), with low relative abundance of other phytoplankton. The peak bloom coincided with high abundance of gelatinous planktivores which may have facilitated bloom development by their grazing on other zooplankton, particularly copepods. Ammonium concentrations increased by approximately 4-fold in the later stages of bloom, coincident with stable NS abundance and chlorophyll concentrations in the nano- and microplankton. This increase likely was attributable to release of intracellular ammonium accumulated through NS grazing. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased in sub-surface waters to near hypoxia. Micro-phytoplankton increasingly dominated chlorophyll-a biomass as the bloom declined, with diminishing picoplankton abundance likely the result of high predation by the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum. Together, these data illustrate factors that can disrupt ecosystem balance in this critically important Indian coastal region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.06.103DOI Listing
October 2016

Distribution of trace metals in surface seawater and zooplankton of the Bay of Bengal, off Rushikulya estuary, East Coast of India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2016 Oct 6;111(1-2):468-475. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

Department of Marine Sciences, Berhampur University, Brahmapur, Odisha 760007, India.

Concentrations of trace metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), vanadium (V), and selenium (Se) were determined in seawater and zooplankton from the surface waters off Rushikulya estuary, north-western Bay of Bengal. During the study period, the concentration of trace metals in seawater and zooplankton showed significant spatio-temporal variation. Cu and Co levels in seawater mostly remained non-detectable. Other elements were found at higher concentrations and exhibited marked variations. The rank order distribution of trace metals in terms of their average concentration in seawater was observed as Fe>Ni>Mn>Pb>As>Zn>Cr>V>Se>Cd while in zooplankton it was Fe>Mn>Cd>As>Pb>Ni>Cr>Zn>V>Se. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of Fe was highest followed by Zn and the lowest value was observed with Ni. Results of correlation analysis discerned positive affinity and good relationship among the majority of the trace metals, both in seawater and zooplankton suggesting their strong affinity and coexistence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.06.099DOI Listing
October 2016

Phytoplankton community structure in local water types at a coastal site in north-western Bay of Bengal.

Environ Monit Assess 2016 Jul 22;188(7):427. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS), "Ocean Valley", Pragathi Nagar (BO), Nizapmpet (SO), Hyderabad, 500090, India.

A comprehensive analysis on seasonal distribution of phytoplankton community structure and their interaction with environmental variables was carried out in two local water types (type 1 < 30 m isobath and Type 2 > 30 m isobath) at a coastal site in north-western Bay of Bengal. Phytoplankton community was represented by 211 taxa (146 marine, 37 fresh, 2 brackish, 20 marine-fresh, and 6 marine-brackish-fresh) belonging to seven major groups including 45 potential bloom forming and 22 potential toxin producing species. The seasonal variability depicted enrichment of phytoplankton during pre-monsoon in both water types. Total phytoplankton abundance pattern observed with inter-annual shift during monsoon and post-monsoon period at both water types. In both water types, diatom predominance was observed in terms of species richness and abundance comprising of centric (82 sp.) and pennate (58 sp.) forms. Pennate diatoms, Thalassiothrix longissima and Skeletonema costatum preponderated in both the water types. The diatom abundance was higher in type 1 in comparison to type 2. In general, SiO4 found to fuel growth of the dominant phytoplankton group, diatom in both the water types despite comparative lower concentration of other macronutrients in type 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-016-5424-yDOI Listing
July 2016

A preliminary study on the microzooplankton of Chilika Lake, a brackish water lagoon on the east coast of India.

Environ Monit Assess 2016 Jan 31;188(1):69. Epub 2015 Dec 31.

Department of Marine Sciences, Berhampur University, Berhampur, Odisha, 760007, India.

Abundance and composition of microzooplankton in Chilika Lake were studied covering three seasons during 2012-2013. Ciliates (19 species), rotifers (13 species), crustacean larvae (2 taxa) and heterotrophic dinoflagellates (2 species) were the four major groups. Ciliates, however, have emerged as the most dominant group throughout the lake in all the seasons except in the freshwater-influenced areas. The average contribution of ciliates was highest (avg. 55.3 ± 38.7 %) during the premonsoon season followed by post-monsoon (avg. 49.0 ± 32.5 %) and monsoon (avg. 47.8 ± 41.6 %) seasons. Crustacean larvae formed the second dominant group whose percentage contribution was marginally high in the premonsoon (avg. 41.2 ± 38.8 %) followed by monsoon (avg. 29.1 ± 27.0 %) and post-monsoon (avg. 28.7 ± 23.4 %). Results of cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling on abundance of microzooplankton depicted well-defined clusters. The stations with high salinity formed a different group indicating seasonal variation in species composition and abundance of microzooplankton is primarily governed by salinity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-015-5062-9DOI Listing
January 2016

Interannual and cyclone-driven variability in phytoplankton communities of a tropical coastal lagoon.

Mar Pollut Bull 2015 Dec 21;101(1):39-52. Epub 2015 Nov 21.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Barkul, Balugaon 751014, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

One of the main challenges in phytoplankton ecology is to understand their variability at different spatiotemporal scales. We investigated the interannual and cyclone-derived variability in phytoplankton communities of Chilika, the largest tropical coastal lagoon in Asia and the underlying mechanisms in relation to environmental forcing. Between July 2012 and June 2013, Cyanophyta were most prolific in freshwater northern region of the lagoon. A category-5 very severe cyclonic storm (VSCS) Phailin struck the lagoon on 12th October 2013 and introduced additional variability into the hydrology and phytoplankton communities. Freshwater Cyanophyta further expanded their territory and occupied the northern as well as central region of the lagoon. Satellite remote sensing imagery revealed that the phytoplankton biomass did not change much due to high turbidity prevailing in the lagoon after Phailin. Modeling analysis of species-salinity relationship identified specific responses of phytoplankton taxa to the different salinity regime of lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2015.11.030DOI Listing
December 2015

Spatiotemporal distribution and composition of phytoplankton assemblages in a coastal tropical lagoon: Chilika, India.

Environ Monit Assess 2015 Feb 1;187(2):47. Epub 2015 Feb 1.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Barkul, Balugaon, Odisha, 752030, India.

The Asia's largest lagoon, Chilika, is a shallow water estuary and a designated "Ramsar" site located in the east coast of India. The spatiotemporal diversity of phytoplankton based on the monthly sampling between July 2011 and June 2012 was investigated in relation to physicochemical variables of the surface water column from 13 stations. The salinity was minimum (average 9) during the monsoon which was primarily due to riverine discharge. As the season progressed towards post-monsoon, average salinity of the whole lagoon reached to 10 which further increased to 20 during pre-monsoon season. A total of 259 species of phytoplankton, mostly dominated by the Bacillariophyta (138 species) followed by Dinophyta (38 species), Chlorophyta (32 species), Cyanophyta (29 species), Euglenophyta (18 species), and Chrysophyta (4 species), were recorded in this study. Different ecological sectors of the lagoon (except the northern sector) were dominated by diatoms, while the northern sector due to its freshwater regime supported large population of euglenoids. Based on the multivariate ordination analysis, salinity regime and light availability played important role in determining the distribution, diversity, and composition of phytoplankton communities. Overall, this study documented a very high diversity of phytoplankton and highlighted the importance of taking extensive sampling in getting a clearer understanding of phytoplankton community structure in less-studied environments such as Chilika lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-014-4212-9DOI Listing
February 2015