Publications by authors named "Su Yadana"

6 Publications

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Impact of HIV status on systemic inflammation during pregnancy.

AIDS 2021 Jul 8. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, USA Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, USA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Government Medical College, Pune, India Byramjee-Jeejeebhoy Government Medical college-Johns Hopkins University Clinical Research Site, Pune, India Instituto Goncalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Brazil Multinational Organization Network Sponsoring Translational and Epidemiological Research, (MONSTER) Initiative, Salvador, Brazil Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil Curso de Medicina, Faculdade de Tecnologia e Ciências, Salvador, Brazil Universidade Salvador (UNIFACS), Laureate Universities, Salvador, Brazil Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública (EBMSP), Salvador, Brazil National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Research in Tuberculosis, International Center for Excellence in Research, Chennai, India Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA.

Objective: There are limited studies on the association of HIV infection with systemic inflammation during pregnancy.

Design: A cohort study (N = 220) of pregnant women with HIV (N = 70) (all on antiretroviral therapy) and without HIV (N = 150) were enrolled from an antenatal clinic in Pune, India.

Methods: The following systemic inflammatory markers were measured in plasma samples using immunoassays: soluble CD163 (sCD163), soluble CD14 (sCD14), intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), interferon-β (IFNβ), interferon-γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-13, IL-17A and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Generalized estimating equation (GEE) and linear regression models were used to assess the association of HIV status with each inflammatory marker during pregnancy and by trimester, respectively.

Results: Pregnant women with HIV had higher levels of markers for gut barrier dysfunction (I-FABP), monocyte activation (sCD14) and markers of systemic inflammation (IL-6 and TNFα), but surprisingly lower levels of AGP, an acute phase protein, compared to pregnant women without HIV, with some trimester-specific differences.

Conclusions: Our data show that women with HIV had higher levels of markers of gut barrier dysfunction, monocyte activation and systemic inflammation. These markers, some of which are associated with preterm birth, might help explain the increase in adverse birth outcomes in women with HIV and could suggest targets for potential interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000003016DOI Listing
July 2021

Systemic Inflammation in Pregnant Women With Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

Front Immunol 2020 27;11:587617. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, United States.

Background: Recent studies in adults have characterized differences in systemic inflammation between adults with and without latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI+ . LTBI-). Potential differences in systemic inflammation by LTBI status has not been assess in pregnant women.

Methods: We conducted a cohort study of 155 LTBI+ and 65 LTBI- pregnant women, stratified by HIV status, attending an antenatal clinic in Pune, India. LTBI status was assessed by interferon gamma release assay. Plasma was used to measure systemic inflammation markers using immunoassays: IFN, CRP, AGP, I-FABP, IFN, IL-1, soluble CD14 (sCD14), sCD163, TNF, IL-6, IL-17a and IL-13. Linear regression models were fit to test the association of LTBI status with each inflammation marker. We also conducted an exploratory analysis using logistic regression to test the association of inflammatory markers with TB progression.

Results: Study population was a median age of 23 (Interquartile range: 21-27), 28% undernourished (mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) <23 cm), 12% were vegetarian, 10% with gestational diabetes and 32% with HIV. In multivariable models, LTBI+ women had significantly lower levels of third trimester AGP, IL1β, sCD163, IL-6 and IL-17a. Interestingly, in exploratory analysis, LTBI+ TB progressors had significantly higher levels of IL1, IL-6 and IL-13 in multivariable models compared to LTBI+ non-progressors.

Conclusions: Our data shows a distinct systemic immune profile in LTBI+ pregnant women compared to LTBI- women. Data from our exploratory analysis suggest that LTBI+ TB progressors do not have this immune profile, suggesting negative association of this profile with TB progression. If other studies confirm these differences by LTBI status and show a causal relationship with TB progression, this immune profile could identify subsets of LTBI+ pregnant women at high risk for TB progression and who can be targeted for preventative therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.587617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7873478PMC
July 2021

Association of Vegetable and Animal Flesh Intake with Inflammation in Pregnant Women from India.

Nutrients 2020 Dec 8;12(12). Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY 10032, USA.

In pregnant women, studies are lacking on the relationship of vegetable and animal flesh (poultry, red meat and seafood) intake with inflammation, especially in low- and middle-income countries. We conducted a cohort study of pregnant women receiving antenatal care at BJ Medical College in Pune, India. The dietary intake of pregnant women was queried in the third trimester using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Twelve inflammatory markers were measured in plasma samples using immunoassays. Only 12% of the study population were vegetarians, although animal flesh intake levels were lower compared to Western populations. In multivariable models, higher intakes of total vegetables were associated with lower levels of the T-helper (Th) 17 cytokine interleukin (IL)-17a ( = 0.03) and the monocyte/macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) ( = 0.02). Additionally, higher intakes of poultry were negatively associated with intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (I-FABP) levels ( = 0.01), a marker of intestinal barrier dysfunction and Th2 cytokine IL-13 ( = 0.03), and higher seafood was associated with lower IL-13 ( = 0.005). Our data from pregnant women in India suggest that a higher quality diet emphasizing vegetables and with some animal flesh is associated with lower inflammation. Future studies should confirm these findings and test if modulating vegetables and animal flesh intake could impact specific aspects of immunity and perinatal health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12123767DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7762525PMC
December 2020

Monitoring for airborne respiratory viruses in a general pediatric ward in Singapore.

J Public Health Res 2019 Dec 4;8(3):1407. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.

There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that transmission of respiratory viruses occurs through the inhalation of virus-laden particles. Our study describes the use of an aerosol sampling system to monitor the prevalence of airborne viruses in a hospital setting. Using SKC AirCheck Touch pumps, with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) bioaerosol samplers and SKC filter cassette blanks, 28 aerosol samples were collected in a hospital ward in Singapore. Following DNA/RNA extraction, real-time RT-PCR/PCR was used for the detection of influenza A, B and D viruses, coronaviruses, enteroviruses, and adenoviruses. Airborne virus was detected in nine (32%) of 28 samples. Among the nine positive samples, eight were PCR-positive for adenovirus and one for influenza A virus. Our data suggest that bioaerosol sampling could be valuable in monitoring for airborne respiratory viruses in clinical environments to better understand the risk of infection during a hospital visit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/jphr.2019.1407DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6902309PMC
December 2019

Adenoviral Infections in Singapore: Should New Antiviral Therapies and Vaccines Be Adopted?

J Infect Dis 2020 02;221(4):566-577

Emerging Infectious Diseases Programme, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.

Background: A number of serious human adenovirus (HAdV) outbreaks have been recently reported: HAdV-B7 (Israel, Singapore, and USA), HAdV-B7d (USA and China), HAdV-D8, -D54, and -C2 (Japan), HAdV-B14p1 (USA, Europe, and China), and HAdV-B55 (China, Singapore, and France).

Methods: To understand the epidemiology of HAdV infections in Singapore, we studied 533 HAdV-positive clinical samples collected from 396 pediatric and 137 adult patients in Singapore from 2012 to 2018. Genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were performed to identify HAdV genotypes, clonal clusters, and recombinant or novel HAdVs.

Results: The most prevalent genotypes identified were HAdV-B3 (35.6%), HAdV-B7 (15.4%), and HAdV-E4 (15.2%). We detected 4 new HAdV-C strains and detected incursions with HAdV-B7 (odds ratio [OR], 14.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1-52.0) and HAdV-E4 (OR, 13.6; 95% CI, 3.9-46.7) among pediatric patients over time. In addition, immunocompromised patients (adjusted OR [aOR], 11.4; 95% CI, 3.8-34.8) and patients infected with HAdV-C2 (aOR, 8.5; 95% CI, 1.5-48.0), HAdV-B7 (aOR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.2-10.9), or HAdV-E4 (aOR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.1-8.9) were at increased risk for severe disease.

Conclusions: Singapore would benefit from more frequent studies of clinical HAdV genotypes to identify patients at risk for severe disease and help guide the use of new antiviral therapies, such as brincidofovir, and potential administration of HAdV 4 and 7 vaccine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz489DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7107482PMC
February 2020

Bioaerosol Sampling for Respiratory Viruses in Singapore's Mass Rapid Transit Network.

Sci Rep 2018 11 30;8(1):17476. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Emerging Infectious Diseases Programme, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.

As a leading global city with a high population density, Singapore is at risk for the introduction of novel biological threats. This risk has been recently reinforced by human epidemics in Singapore of SARS coronavirus, 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus, and enterovirus 71. Other major threats to Singapore include MERS-coronavirus and various avian and swine influenza viruses. The ability to quickly identify and robustly track such threats to initiate an early emergency response remains a significant challenge. In an effort to enhance respiratory virus surveillance in Singapore, our team conducted a pilot study employing a noninvasive bioaerosol sampling method to detect respiratory viruses in Singapore's Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) network. Over a period of 52 weeks, 89 aerosol samples were collected during peak MRT ridership hours. Nine (10%) tested positive for adenovirus, four (4.5%) tested positive for respiratory syncytial virus type A, and one (1%) tested positive for influenza A virus using real-time RT-PCR/PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first time molecular evidence for any infectious respiratory agent has been collected from Singapore's MRT. Our pilot study data support the possibility of employing bioaerosol samplers in crowded public spaces to noninvasively monitor for respiratory viruses circulating in communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35896-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6269463PMC
November 2018
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