Publications by authors named "Styliani Pappa"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

West Nile fever upsurge in a Greek regional unit, 2020.

Acta Trop 2021 Jun 12;221:106010. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Ecodevelopment SA, Thessaloniki, Greece.

During the 2020 West Nile virus (WNV) transmission season, Greece was the most affected EU Member State. More than one third of human cases occurred in Serres regional unit in northern Greece, which is characterized by the presence of a major wetland (Kerkini lake and Strimon river). A total of 2809 Culex pipiens mosquitoes collected in Serres were grouped into 70 pools and tested for WNV. Ten (14.3%) pools were found positive, and all WNV sequences belonged to the Central European subclade of WNV lineage 2. The first human case occurred in a village nearby the lake, and all following cases occurred across the connected river and its tributaries. Similar distribution presented the sites where WNV-positive mosquitoes were detected. The number of Culex spp. mosquitoes per trap per night was higher in 2020 than in previous years (2017-2019). The spatial and temporal distribution of human cases and WNV-positive mosquitoes in 2020 in Serres regional unit suggest that the upsurge of the virus circulation was probably related with factors that affected the ecosystem of the wetland.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2021.106010DOI Listing
June 2021

Urine-Based Molecular Diagnostic Tests for Leishmaniasis Infection in Human and Canine Populations: A Meta-Analysis.

Pathogens 2021 Feb 27;10(3). Epub 2021 Feb 27.

Department of Computer Science and Biomedical Informatics, University of Thessaly, 2-4, Papasiopoulou Str., 35131 Lamia, Greece.

Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease affecting humans and domesticated animals with high mortality in endemic countries. The pleiotropy of symptoms and the complicated gold-standard methods make the need for non-invasive, highly sensitive diagnostic tests imperative. Individual studies on molecular-based diagnosis in urine show high discrepancy; thus, a data-evidenced comparison of various techniques is necessary. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis using the bivariate method of diagnostic methods to pool sensitivities and specificities. We investigated the impact of DNA-extraction method, PCR type, amplified locus, host species, leishmaniasis form, and geographical region. The pooled sensitivity was 69.2%. Tests performed with the kit-based DNA extraction method and qPCR outweighed in sensitivity the phenol-chloroform-based and PCR methods, while their combination showed a sensitivity of 79.3%. Amplified locus, human or canine as host and cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis revealed similar sensitivities. Tests in European and Middle Eastern countries performed better than tests in other regions (sensitivity 81.7% vs. 43.7%). A combination of kit-based DNA extraction and qPCR could be a safer choice for molecular diagnosis for infection in urine samples in European-Middle Eastern countries. For the rest of the world, more studies are needed to better characterize the endemic parasite species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10030269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7996766PMC
February 2021

Spread of NDM-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a tertiary Greek hospital.

Acta Microbiol Immunol Hung 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

2Department of Microbiology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Bacterial carbapenem resistance, especially when mediated by transferable carbapenemases, is of important public health concern. An increased number of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated in a tertiary hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece, called for further genetic investigation.The study included 29 non-repetitive carbapenem resistant K. pneumoniae isolates phenotypically characterized as MBL-producers collected in a tertiary hospital in Greece. The isolates were screened for the detection of carbapenemase genes (K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (blaKPC), Verona-integron-encoded MBL-1 (blaVIM-1), imipenemase (blaIMP), oxacillinase-48 (blaOXA-48) and New Delhi MBL (blaNDM)). The genetic relationship of the isolates was determined by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The whole genome sequences (WGS) from two NDM-positive K. pneumoniae isolates were further characterized.The presence of New Delhi MBL (blaNDM) gene was confirmed in all K. pneumoniae isolates, while blaKPC and blaVIM-1 genes were co-detected in one and two isolates, respectively. The RAPD analysis showed that the isolates were clustered into two groups. The whole genome sequence analysis of two K. pneumoniae isolates revealed that they belonged to the sequence type 11, they carried the blaNDM-1 gene, and exhibited differences in the number and type of the plasmids and the resistant genes.All MBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates of the study harbored a blaNDM gene, while WGS analysis revealed genetic diversity in resistance genes. Continuous surveillance is needed to detect the emergence of new clones in a hospital setting, while application of antimicrobial stewardship is the only way to reduce the spread of multi-resistant bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/030.2021.01400DOI Listing
March 2021

West Nile virus in humans, Greece, 2018: the largest seasonal number of cases, 9 years after its emergence in the country.

Euro Surveill 2020 08;25(32)

National Reference Center for Arboviruses and Haemorrhagic Fever Viruses, Department of Microbiology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

BackgroundHuman cases of West Nile virus (WNV) infection are recorded since 2010 in Greece, with seasonal outbreaks occurring almost annually. Enhanced surveillance has been implemented since 2010, to promptly characterise cases' temporal and geographical distribution and inform authorities for implementation of appropriate measures (mosquito control, health education, blood safety).AimWe describe the epidemiology of WNV human infections in Greece focusing on the 2018 season.MethodsThe National Public Health Organization advised physicians to test all suspect WNV infection cases and refer samples to reference laboratories. Laboratories notified diagnosed cases on a daily basis. Treating physicians, patients, and infected blood donors were interviewed within 48 hours after diagnosis and the probable infection location was identified. Hospitalised cases were followed up until discharge.ResultsA total of 317 autochthonous WNV infection cases were diagnosed in 2018. Among them, 243 cases had neuroinvasive disease (WNND), representing a 23% increase of WNND cases compared with 2010, the previous most intense season. There were 51 deaths. Cases started occurring from week 22, earlier than usual. Both rural and urban areas were affected, with 86 (26% of the total) municipalities belonging to seven (54% of the total) regions recording cases. Two major epicentres were identified in Attica and Central Macedonia regions.ConclusionsThe largest number of human cases of WNV infection ever recorded in Greece occurred in 2018, with a wide geographical distribution, suggesting intense virus circulation. Enhanced surveillance is vital for the early detection of human cases and the prompt implementation of response measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.32.1900543DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7427301PMC
August 2020

West Nile virus lineage 2 in Culex mosquitoes in Thessaly, Greece, 2019.

Acta Trop 2020 May 15;208:105514. Epub 2020 May 15.

EcoDevelopment SA, Thessaloniki, Greece.

West Nile virus is a flavivirus transmitted to humans mainly by mosquito bites. Outbreaks are observed in several European countries, and Greece is one of the most affected countries during the recent years. Thessaly was one of the most affected regions in Greece in 2019. A total of 3,025 Culex spp. mosquitoes collected in Thessaly were grouped into 47 pools and tested for West Nile virus (WNV). Eight (17%) pools were found positive. Whole genome sequences were obtained from two positive pools. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the causative strain was an evolutionary variant of the strains circulating in 2018 belonging to the Balkan subgroup of the Central European subclade of WNV lineage 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2020.105514DOI Listing
May 2020

Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Greece, 2016-2018.

Intervirology 2019 29;62(5-6):210-215. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Department of Microbiology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece,

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute bronchiolitis in infants and young children. Children under the age of 2 years, hospitalized for bronchiolitis in the pediatric clinic of a tertiary hospital in northern Greece, were tested for RSV infection during two RSV seasons (2016-2017 and 2017-2018). RSV was detected in 37 of 71 (52.1%) patients, most of them younger than 6 months. Both RSV subtypes were detected - RSV-A (54.1%) and RSV-B (45.9%) - with predominance of RSV-A during the 2016-2017 and RSV-B during the 2017-2018 season. RSV-A and RSV-B sequences clustered within the ON1 and BA genotypes, respectively. Compared to the prototype strains, several amino acid substitutions were observed in the duplication region of the G gene. The study provides a first insight into the molecular epidemiology of RSV in Greece.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000506049DOI Listing
April 2020

West Nile virus lineage 2 in humans and mosquitoes in Bulgaria, 2018-2019.

J Clin Virol 2020 06 11;127:104365. Epub 2020 Apr 11.

Department of Parasitology, National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Background: West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2, and especially the Hungarian clade, predominates in Europe. Most of the Hungarian clade strains cluster into 2 groups: Central/South-West European and Balkan.

Objectives: Since there was not any study on WNV in mosquitoes in Bulgaria, the present study was designed to test Culex spp. mosquitoes in areas near the Danube river. The aim of the study was to gain an insight into the recent molecular epidemiology of WNV in Bulgaria.

Study Design: A total of 1871 Culex pipiens mosquitoes collected in 2018 and clinical samples from 23 patients with West Nile neuroinavsive disease observed in 2018 and 2019 were tested by TaqMan RT-PCR and RT-nested PCR and PCR products were sequenced.

Results: WNV RNA was detected in clinical samples from 10 patients and in five (12.2 %) of 41 pools of Cx. pipiens mosquitos by realtime RT-PCR, resulting in a minimum infection rate of mosquitoes of 0.27 %. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial NS3 gene sequences from one clinical sample and four mosquito pools showed that all sequences clustered into the Hungarian clade of WNV lineage 2 and all but one were identical to respective sequences from Romania. Whole genome sequences of one mosquito pool belong to the Hungarian group of WNV lineage 2 and cluster in a separate subclade from the Bulgarian strain from 2015, suggesting that at least two different introductions occurred in Bulgaria.

Conclusions: The current study provides insights into the geographic distribution of WNV in Bulgaria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2020.104365DOI Listing
June 2020

Detection of flaviviruses and alphaviruses in mosquitoes in Central Macedonia, Greece, 2018.

Acta Trop 2020 Feb 20;202:105278. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

EcoDevelopment SA, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Culex mosquitoes are vectors of several flaviviruses and alphaviruses posing a potential risk to public and veterinary health. In order to gain an insight into the flaviviruses and alphaviruses circulating in the five regional units of Central Macedonia in northern Greece, 17,470 female Culex spp. mosquitoes collected during 2018 were tested for these viruses. Among 229 mosquito pools, West Nile virus (WNV) was detected in 10 (4.4%) pools, while insect-specific flavi- and alphaviruses were detected in 2 (0.9%) and 8 (3.5%) pools, respectively. WNV minimum infection rate (MIR) was 0.57. The highest MIR was identified in Thessaloniki regional unit, where several human cases of WNV infection occurred in 2018. All ten WNV sequences cluster into the Central European subclade of lineage 2. It is of note that the first WNV-positive mosquito pool was detected two weeks prior the report of the first human case in the area, suggesting that testing of mosquitoes could serve as early warning system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.105278DOI Listing
February 2020

Emergence of West Nile virus lineage 2 belonging to the Eastern European subclade, Greece.

Arch Virol 2019 Jun 5;164(6):1673-1675. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

General Directorate of Public Health and Social Care of Region of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, Komotini, Greece.

West Nile virus (WNV) emerged in Greece in 2010 and since then human outbreaks occurred every year except 2015 and 2016. An early start and prolonged WNV transmission season was observed in 2018 with a record number of 316 reported cases and 47 fatalities. The Greek WNV strains detected during 2010-2018 clustered within the central European subclade of lineage 2. A novel WNV genetic variant was detected in August 2018 in one human case in the north-eastern region of Greece, at the land cross-border with Turkey and Bulgaria. The strain belongs to the Eastern European subclade of lineage 2 suggesting a new virus introduction in the country and the continuously changing epidemiology of the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-019-04243-8DOI Listing
June 2019

Isolation and whole-genome sequencing of a Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strain, Greece.

Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2018 05 1;9(4):788-791. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Clinic of Farm Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) was isolated from a pool of two adult Rhipicephalus bursa ticks removed from a goat in 2015 in Greece. The strain clusters into lineage Europe 2 representing the second available whole-genome sequenced isolate of this lineage. CCHFV IgG antibodies were detected in 8 of 19 goats of the farm. Currently CCHFV is not associated with disease in mammals other than humans. Studies in animal models are needed to investigate the pathogenicity level of lineage Europe 2 and compare it with that of other lineages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2018.02.024DOI Listing
May 2018

Molecular epidemiology of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Bulgaria--An update.

J Med Virol 2016 May 15;88(5):769-73. Epub 2015 Oct 15.

National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is endemic in Bulgaria. During 2013-2014, 11 confirmed CCHF cases have been reported in the country (seven in 2013 and four in 2014). The present study provides the CCHF molecular epidemiology in Bulgaria based on all currently available S, M, and L RNA segment nucleotide sequences spanning the years 1978-2014. A relatively low genetic difference (0-6%, the maximum seen in the M RNA segment) was seen among the CCHFV sequences suggesting that a slow evolving CCHFV strain belonging to "Europe 1" clade is present in Bulgaria. Although the virus emerged in new foci during the recent years, it is more active in the established endemic foci which seem to offer the most suitable ecosystem and environment. Understanding the CCHF epidemiology and virus evolution is the basis for public health programs and vaccine design.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.24400DOI Listing
May 2016

Tumour necrosis factor gene polymorphisms and migraine in Greek children.

Arch Med Sci 2010 Jun;6(3):430-7

School of Medicine, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Introduction: Migraine is considered to be a multifactorial, complex disease. Various genetic and environmental factors contribute to the manifestation of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) region are associated with the risk of migraine. We examined the association between 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding regions of TNF-α and TNF-β genes and migraine.

Material And Methods: The study included two groups of children (group A and group B). Group A consisted of 103 unrelated children with typical migraine without aura 5-14 years of age. Group B (control group) consisted of 178 unrelated healthy children. The diagnosis of migraine was, in all patients, made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD II).

Results: According to our results positive family history was present in 62.2% of patients of group A. No significant differences were found in the frequencies of genotypes or alleles between patients and controls. The non-parametric analyses of variance showed no significant differences in the age at onset between genotype groups of the TNF-α and TNF-β gene polymorphisms. Comparison of genotype frequencies between boys and girls in affected patients and control individuals were not significantly different (p = 0.089, p =0.073 respectively). The distribution of TNF polymorphisms was not associated with the presence of family history of migraine in patients.

Conclusions: Our data indicate that TNF-α and TNF-β gene polymorphisms are not a significant risk factor for migraine without aura in Greek children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/aoms.2010.14267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3282523PMC
June 2010