Publications by authors named "Steven Labkoff"

5 Publications

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Who Watches the Watchers. Working Towards Safety for EHR Knowledge Resources.

Appl Clin Inform 2017 06 28;8(2):680-685. Epub 2017 Jun 28.

Steven E. Labkoff, MD, FACP, FACMI, Purdue Pharma L.P., Stamford, CT., Email:

The rise in the use of electronic health records (EHRs) and associated resources over the last decade is leading to the end of the paper medical record and all the risks associated with the use of a paper chart. However, there has not been a concomitant creation of a systematic oversight body that is specifically charged with ensuring the public's safety through the use of EHR knowledge resource tools or EHRs themselves. We recommend the formation a Health Information Technology Safety Center. Such a center could collect error reports, review EHRs and the knowledge resources incorporated within them, and investigate particularly challenging EHR-related safety issues at participating health care delivery organizations. Safety issues could be identified, corrected, and the solutions widely disseminated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4338/ACI-2017-02-IE-0032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6241753PMC
June 2017

Opportunities for electronic health record data to support business functions in the pharmaceutical industry--a case study from Pfizer, Inc.

J Am Med Inform Assoc 2008 Sep-Oct;15(5):581-4. Epub 2008 Jun 25.

Pfizer Healthcare Informatics, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA.

The Pfizer Healthcare Informatics team conducted a series of guided interviews with 35 Pfizer senior leaders to elicit their understanding, desires, and expectations of how Electronic Health Records (EHR) might be used in the pharmaceutical industry today and/or in the future. The interviews yielded fourteen use case categories comprising 42 specific use cases. The highest priority use cases were "Drug Safety & Surveillance," "Clinical Trial Recruitment," and "Support Regulatory Approval." Fifteen EHR companies were surveyed to assess their functionality against the specified use cases. Self-reported responses from the EHR companies were highest for "Virtual Phase IV Trials" and "Document Management for Clinical Trials." This research identifies preliminary opportunities for EHR products to provide aggregate, blinded data to address the interests of the pharmaceutical industry. However, further collaboration between the stakeholders will be necessary to ensure the full realization of the opportunities for data re-use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1197/jamia.M2605DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2528036PMC
January 2010

Toward a national framework for the secondary use of health data: an American Medical Informatics Association White Paper.

J Am Med Inform Assoc 2007 Jan-Feb;14(1):1-9. Epub 2006 Oct 31.

American Medical Informatics Association, 4915 St. Elmo Avenue, Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.

Secondary use of health data applies personal health information (PHI) for uses outside of direct health care delivery. It includes such activities as analysis, research, quality and safety measurement, public health, payment, provider certification or accreditation, marketing, and other business applications, including strictly commercial activities. Secondary use of health data can enhance health care experiences for individuals, expand knowledge about disease and appropriate treatments, strengthen understanding about effectiveness and efficiency of health care systems, support public health and security goals, and aid businesses in meeting customers' needs. Yet, complex ethical, political, technical, and social issues surround the secondary use of health data. While not new, these issues play increasingly critical and complex roles given current public and private sector activities not only expanding health data volume, but also improving access to data. Lack of coherent policies and standard "good practices" for secondary use of health data impedes efforts to strengthen the U.S. health care system. The nation requires a framework for the secondary use of health data with a robust infrastructure of policies, standards, and best practices. Such a framework can guide and facilitate widespread collection, storage, aggregation, linkage, and transmission of health data. The framework will provide appropriate protections for legitimate secondary use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1197/jamia.M2273DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2329823PMC
March 2007

A framework for systematic evaluation of health information infrastructure progress in communities.

J Biomed Inform 2007 Apr 21;40(2):100-5. Epub 2006 Feb 21.

Healthcare Informatics Group, US Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer Inc, USA.

It is widely agreed that major improvements in the safety, quality, and efficiency of health care in the US require a National Health Information Infrastructure. To accomplish this, efforts are now underway in many communities to build local or regional health information infrastructures (HIIs) that provide secure, ubiquitous access to complete health care information. To facilitate the assessment and monitoring of the progress of operational HIIs toward completion, we propose a framework of four key measures of requirements that must be ultimately be met: (1) completeness of information, (2) degree of usage, (3) types of usage, and (4) financial sustainability. To evaluate the framework, it was used by the authors to qualitatively assess HII projects in cooperation with four leading communities, resulting in ratings of 78% for Bellingham, WA, 63% for Indianapolis, IN, 60% for South Bend, IN, and 74% for Spokane, WA. Qualitative assessment of community HII systems may be helpful in monitoring progress, comparing projects, and understanding the remaining tasks needed for completion. Additional testing and refinement of the proposed framework is needed to further understand and improve HII progress measurement capabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbi.2006.01.002DOI Listing
April 2007

"Is the Doctor In?"

Authors:
Steven E Labkoff

Phys Sportsmed 1996 Oct;24(sup1):32-34

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913847.1996.11948073DOI Listing
October 1996