Publications by authors named "Stephen R Lindholm"

3 Publications

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Technique for removal of cannulated screws.

J Orthop Trauma 2005 Apr;19(4):280-1

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

Cannulated screws can become incarcerated or stripped during the process of initial open-reduction internal fixation or at the time of hardware removal. In addition, many different sizes and brands of cannulated screws exist, and the appropriate size or type of screwdriver may not be available. We describe a simple technique for cannulated screw removal that works for all types of screws and can be performed percutaneously using only a Steinmann pin and T- handle chuck or pin driver.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.bot.0000137865.02582.c3DOI Listing
April 2005

Failure of the biceps superior labral complex: a cadaveric biomechanical investigation comparing the late cocking and early deceleration positions of throwing.

Arthroscopy 2003 Apr;19(4):373-9

University of Michigan Shoulder Group, Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Purpose: The goal of the study was to determine which position of the throwing motion, late-cocking or early deceleration, was more likely to produce lesions of the biceps superior labral complex.

Type Of Study: Cadaveric biomechanical model.

Methods: Ten paired cadaver shoulders were prepared and mounted on a custom testing apparatus in 60 degrees glenohumeral abduction with the humerus in the plane of the scapula. All specimens were loaded with 100 cycles of subfailure external rotation torque (7.9 N-m) with 22 N applied to the rotator cuff tendons and long head of the biceps tendon. One of each pair of specimens was randomly tested in a late cocking position for throwing (>125 degrees external rotation, 60 degrees glenohumeral abduction, in the plane of the scapula). The other was tested in a position of early deceleration (80 degrees external rotation, 60 degrees glenohumeral abduction, 16 degrees horizontal adduction). The biceps was loaded to failure with the shoulder fixed in these positions. The specimens were then examined by 2 experienced shoulder surgeons, blinded to the test protocol, to assess for the presence of a type II SLAP lesion.

Results: Failure of the biceps superior labral complex occurred at the superior glenoid in 9 of 10 specimens in the late cocking position and in 2 of 10 specimens in the early deceleration position (P =.055). Five specimens developed type II SLAP lesions, with more in the late cocking position (4 of 10) than in the early deceleration position (1 of 10; P =.12). Load to failure was significantly less for the late cocking position (289 +/- 39 N) than for the early deceleration position (346 +/- 40 N; P =.004).

Conclusions: These results suggest that the late cocking position may contribute to biceps-superolabral complex injuries in the thrower's shoulder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/jars.2003.50044DOI Listing
April 2003

Neer Award 2001: nonrecoverable strain fields of the anteroinferior glenohumeral capsule under subluxation.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2002 Nov-Dec;11(6):529-40

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Valparaiso University, Valapariso.

Although tears of the glenohumeral capsule have been observed in anteroinferior instability, prefailure, nonrecoverable deformation is suspected but has not been shown to exist after shoulder subluxation. The inferior glenohumeral ligament in the anteroinferior capsule (AIC) is a primary stabilizer in anteroinferior instability. The aim of this study was to examine the nonrecoverable strain field of the AIC due to shoulder subluxation. Nonrecoverable strains were calculated between a nominal strain state and a postsubluxed state. AIC marker coordinates were reconstructed from stereoradiographs, and strains were calculated from these coordinates. Nonrecoverable strain was shown to develop, varying from 3% to 7% through a range of joint subluxation. High strain tended to occur on the glenoid side of the AIC. Interestingly, strains were generally not oriented along major ligamentous bands. This is the first study to quantify planar nonrecoverable strain fields in the glenohumeral joint capsule.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mse.2002.127093DOI Listing
March 2003
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