Publications by authors named "Stephen Benton"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Art of Medicine and the Art of Education.

Authors:
Stephen Benton

J Physician Assist Educ 2019 12;30(4):233-235

Stephen Benton, MMSc, PA-C, is a critical care physician assistant at Piedmont Healthcare, Atlanta, Georgia.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPA.0000000000000281DOI Listing
December 2019

The elderly demographic time bomb - sharing the load with the active ageing: can eHealth technologies help defuse it?

Stud Health Technol Inform 2009 ;146:166-70

Business Psychology Centre, University of Westminster, London, UK.

This paper examines strategic health management and practical health service delivery issues inherent in the potential doubling in the number of over 65s over the next two decades. It considers the use of scarce and overloaded resources in providing care and support to this age group across the spectrum of community environments, and advocates the use of shared information services coupled with the deployment of 'smart' technologies to supplement available yet scarce professional resources as well as enabling elderly people to maintain a safe, active and independent lifestyle. An innovative approach to provide support both to an active ageing population, as well as the more frail or vulnerable members of society, is outlined. Based on an ongoing research programme, this centres on the extension of the Smart Home concept to create an overarching smart environment. This combines advanced information, communications and textile technologies with physiological monitoring and location based processes and services, to protect and support users by maintaining the range of services they need. Discussion of the behavioural dynamics inherent in organizational change concludes the paper.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2009

College students' norm perception predicts reported use of protective behavioral strategies for alcohol consumption.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2008 Nov;69(6):859-65

Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs, Kansas State University, 1100 Mid-Campus Drive, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5312, USA.

Objective: This study examined whether college students' descriptive norm perceptions of protective behavioral drinking strategies explain variance in use of such strategies, controlling for covariates of students' gender, typical number of drinks, and negative drinking consequences.

Method: Derivation (n = 7,960; 55.2% women) and replication (n = 8,534; 54.5% women) samples of undergraduate students completed the Campus Alcohol Survey in classroom settings. Students estimated how frequently other students used each of nine protective behavioral strategies (PBS) and how frequently they themselves used each strategy.

Results: All items assessing norm perception of PBS (NPPBS) had pattern matrix coefficients exceeding .50 on a single factor, and all contributed to the overall scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .81). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated NPPBS explained significant variance in PBS, controlling for covariates, and explained an additional 7% of variance (p < .001). A Gender x Scale (PBS, NPPBS) repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed students believed peers used PBS less frequently than they themselves did (eta(p) (2) = .091, p < .001). Such social distancing was greater in women (omega(effect) (2) = .151, p < .001) than in men (omega(effect) (2) = .001, p < .001).

Conclusions: Consistent with the principle of false uniqueness, whereby individuals regard their own positive characteristics as rare, college students-especially women-underestimate how frequently other students use PBS. Such norm misperception may enhance students' feelings of competence and self-esteem. The positive relationship between NPPBS and PBS indicates students with high NPPBS are more likely to use the strategies themselves.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15288/jsad.2008.69.859DOI Listing
November 2008

The doctor-manager relationship: a behavioural barrier to effective health care?

Stud Health Technol Inform 2008 ;137:225-40

Business Psychology Centre, University of Westminster, London, U.K.

The National Health Service (NHS) is a huge and complex organisation. Within it, acute Hospital Trusts operate within a range of constructs determined by central Government. Organisational success is measured against rapidly changing frameworks of standards and targets. The Griffiths report signalled a perceived shift away from the professional autonomy of clinicians, towards general management systems. This resulted in tension between those responsible for delivering the Government's broader health agenda, and those driven by a desire to directly care for patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2008

The safe implementation of research into healthcare practice.

Stud Health Technol Inform 2008 ;137:199-209

University of Westminster, School of Informatics and Centre for Business Information, Organisation, and Process Management Westminster Business School, University of Westminster, UK.

Miscommunication, misunderstanding and outright error have all played significance roles in triggering Adverse Events across the spectrum of health care delivery. As a means of countering these effects this paper outlines a twin track approach. This firstly focuses on developing a care pathway modelling approach both as the basis for better understanding of interdisciplinary process interaction, and also as a means of rapid access to relevant clinical knowledge. This is then set in the context of the human behavioural issues that can all too easily prejudice patient safety. It also explores the potential to apply the large body of knowledge and experience in risk management techniques applied to life critical decision taking under high stress conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2008

College student drinking, attitudes toward risks, and drinking consequences.

J Stud Alcohol 2006 Jul;67(4):543-51

Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5312, USA.

Objective: This study examined whether college students' attitudes toward risks explain significant variance in drinking consequences beyond gender, alcohol use, and self-protective strategies.

Method: A derivation sample (N=276; 52% women) and a replication sample (N=216; 52% women) of undergraduate students completed the Campus Alcohol Survey (CAS) and the Attitudes Toward Risks Scale (ATRS).

Results: Scores on the ATRS correlated positively with students' self-reported typical number of drinks and negative drinking consequences (p<.001). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that ATRS scores explained significant variance in negative drinking consequences beyond college students' gender, typical number of drinks, and use of protective strategies (p<.001). Furthermore, a significant Drinks x ATRS interaction revealed that heavy-drinking students who scored high on the ATRS experienced the most harm from drinking (p<.01). Students with high-risk attitudes showed a stronger link between typical number of drinks and negative drinking consequences.

Conclusions: Even when controlling for students' gender, alcohol use, and protective strategies, college students' attitudes toward risks explain significant variance in drinking consequences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15288/jsa.2006.67.543DOI Listing
July 2006

Predicting negative drinking consequences: examining descriptive norm perception.

J Stud Alcohol 2006 May;67(3):399-405

Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5312, USA.

Objective: This study explored how much variance in college student negative drinking consequences is explained by descriptive norm perception, beyond that accounted for by student gender and self-reported alcohol use.

Method: A derivation sample (N=7565; 54% women) and a replication sample (N=8924; 55.5% women) of undergraduate students completed the Campus Alcohol Survey in classroom settings.

Results: Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that student gender and average number of drinks when "partying" were significantly related to harmful consequences resulting from drinking. Men reported more consequences than did women, and drinking amounts were positively correlated with consequences. However, descriptive norm perception did not explain any additional variance beyond that attributed to gender and alcohol use. Furthermore, there was no significant three-way interaction among student gender, alcohol use, and descriptive norm perception.

Conclusions: Norm perception contributed no significant variance in explaining harmful consequences beyond that explained by college student gender and alcohol use.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15288/jsa.2006.67.399DOI Listing
May 2006

College student protective strategies and drinking consequences.

J Stud Alcohol 2004 Jan;65(1):115-21

Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, Kansas State University, 369 Bluemont Hall, 1100 Mid-Campus Drive, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA.

Objective: This study explored the relationships between college student gender, alcohol use, protective strategies and harmful drinking consequences.

Method: A derivation sample (N = 3,851; 54% women) and a replication sample (N = 4,151; 55% women) of undergraduate students completed the Campus Alcohol Survey (CAS) in classroom settings.

Results: Although women drank less than men and were less likely to experience harmful consequences, they were more likely to use protective strategies. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that students who consumed at least six drinks when they partied--especially men-were less likely to experience more common consequences (e.g., poor academic performance, property damage, unconsciousness, riding in a vehicle with others who have been drinking) if they engaged in self-protective strategies. Such strategies also helped students who exceeded the median number of drinks to moderate the effect of drinking on less common consequences (e.g., vehicular accidents, class failure, conflicts with authorities).

Conclusions: These findings add to the growing literature on contextual events that protect students from harm while drinking.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15288/jsa.2004.65.115DOI Listing
January 2004

Low frequency noise "pollution" interferes with performance.

Noise Health 2001 ;4(13):33-49

Department of Environmental Medicine, Göteburg University, Box 414, Goteburg 405 30,Sweden.

To study the possible interference of low frequency noise on performance and annoyance, subjects categorised as having a high- or low sensitivity to noise in general and low frequency noise in particular worked with different performance tasks in a noise environment with predominantly low frequency content or flat frequency content (reference noise), both at a level of 40 dBA. The effects were evaluated in terms of changes in performance and subjective reactions. The results showed that there was a larger improvement of response time over time, during work with a verbal grammatical reasoning task in the reference noise, as compared to the low frequency noise condition. The results further indicated that low frequency noise interfered with a proof-reading task by lowering the number of marks made per line read. The subjects reported a higher degree of annoyance and impaired working capacity when working under conditions of low frequency noise. The effects were more pronounced for subjects rated as high-sensitive to low frequency noise, while partly different results were obtained for subjects rated as high-sensitive to noise in general. The results suggest that the quality of work performance and perceived annoyance may be influenced by a continuous exposure to low frequency noise at commonly occurring noise levels. Subjects categorised as high-sensitive to low frequency noise may be at highest risk.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2001