Publications by authors named "Stephen A Forrest"

2 Publications

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Eighteenth century Yersinia pestis genomes reveal the long-term persistence of an historical plague focus.

Elife 2016 Jan 21;5:e12994. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

The 14th-18th century pandemic of Yersinia pestis caused devastating disease outbreaks in Europe for almost 400 years. The reasons for plague's persistence and abrupt disappearance in Europe are poorly understood, but could have been due to either the presence of now-extinct plague foci in Europe itself, or successive disease introductions from other locations. Here we present five Y. pestis genomes from one of the last European outbreaks of plague, from 1722 in Marseille, France. The lineage identified has not been found in any extant Y. pestis foci sampled to date, and has its ancestry in strains obtained from victims of the 14th century Black Death. These data suggest the existence of a previously uncharacterized historical plague focus that persisted for at least three centuries. We propose that this disease source may have been responsible for the many resurgences of plague in Europe following the Black Death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12994DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4798955PMC
January 2016

Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis.

Nature 2014 Oct 20;514(7523):494-7. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

1] Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Tübingen, Ruemelinstraße 23, 72070 Tübingen, Germany [2] Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment, University of Tübingen, Tübingen 72070, Germany [3] Max Planck Institute for Science and History, Khalaische Straße 10, 07745 Jena, Germany.

Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained its worldwide distribution following human dispersals out of Africa during the Pleistocene epoch, although this has yet to be confirmed with ancient calibration points. Here we present three 1,000-year-old mycobacterial genomes from Peruvian human skeletons, revealing that a member of the M. tuberculosis complex caused human disease before contact. The ancient strains are distinct from known human-adapted forms and are most closely related to those adapted to seals and sea lions. Two independent dating approaches suggest a most recent common ancestor for the M. tuberculosis complex less than 6,000 years ago, which supports a Holocene dispersal of the disease. Our results implicate sea mammals as having played a role in transmitting the disease to humans across the ocean.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13591DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550673PMC
October 2014