Publications by authors named "Stephanie Pasas-Farmer"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Report on the 18th Annual Land O'Lakes Bioanalytical Conference.

Bioanalysis 2018 Apr 10;10(7):445-449. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA.

The 18th Annual Land O'Lakes Bioanalytical Conference, titled 'Cutting-Edge Bioanalytical Technologies and Concepts - Issues, Solutions and Practical Considerations for Applications in Novel and Emerging Modalities', was held 10-13 July 2017 in Madison, WI, USA. This Land O'Lakes Conference is presented each year by the Division of Pharmacy Professional Development within the School of Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA). The purpose of this conference is to provide an educational forum to discuss issues and applications associated with the analysis of xenobiotics, metabolites, biologics and biomarkers in biological matrices. The conference is designed to include and encourage an open exchange of scientific and methodological applications for bioanalysis. This report summarized the presentations at the 18th Annual Conference.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2018-4000DOI Listing
April 2018

Recommendations on incurred sample stability (ISS) by GCC.

Bioanalysis 2014 Sep;6(18):2385-90

Quintiles Bioanalytical & ADME Labs, Ithaca, NY, USA.

The topic of incurred sample stability (ISS) has generated considerable discussion within the bioanalytical community in recent years. The subject was an integral part of the seventh annual Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) held in Long Beach, CA, USA, in April 2013, and at the Global CRO Council for Bioanalysis (GCC) meeting preceding it. Discussion at both events focused on the use of incurred samples for ISS purposes in light of results from a recent GCC survey completed by member companies. This paper reports the consensus resulting from these discussions and serves as a useful reference for depicting ISS issues and concerns, summarizing the GCC survey results and providing helpful recommendations on ISS in the context of bioanalytical method development and application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.14.155DOI Listing
September 2014

Global bioanalytical support.

Bioanalysis 2014 May;6(10):1349-56

Frontage Laboratories, Inc., 700 Pennsylvania Drive, Exton, PA 19341, USA.

With the globalization of drug development, there is an increasing need for global bioanalytical support. Bioanalysis provides pivotal data for toxicokinetic, pharmacokinetic, bioavailability and bioequivalence studies used for regional or global regulatory submission. There are many known complications in building a truly global bioanalytical operation, ranging from lack of global regulatory guidelines and global standard operating procedures to barriers in regional requirements on sample shipping, importation and exportation. The primary objective of this article is to discuss common experiences and challenges facing the biopharmaceutical industry when providing bioanalytical support in a global setting. The key components of global bioanalytical services include the supporting infrastructure, spanning project management, IT support of data management, best practices in bioanalytical method transfer and sample analysis, and comprehensive knowledge of the requirements of bioanalysis guidelines and differences in these guidelines. A case study will highlight best practices for successful management of a global project.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.14.101DOI Listing
May 2014

A simplified and completely automated workflow for regulated LC-MS/MS bioanalysis using cap-piercing direct sampling and evaporation-free solid phase extraction.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2013 Mar 4;921-922:64-74. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

Analytical & Bioanalytical Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ 08540, United States.

Automated sample extraction for regulated bioanalysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) still presents significant challenges. A new sample preparation methodology with a simplified and completely automated workflow was developed to overcome these challenges using cap piercing for direct biofluid transfer and evaporation-free solid phase extraction (SPE). Using pierceable cap sample tubes, a robotic liquid handler was able to sample without uncapping or recapping during sample preparation. Evaporation for SPE was eliminated by using a mobile phase-compatible elution solvent followed by sample dilution prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Presented here are three LC-MS/MS assays validated using this methodology to support three CNS drug development programs: (1) BMS-763534 and its metabolite, BMS-790318, in dog plasma; (2) BMS-694153 in monkey plasma; and (3) Pexacerfont (BMS-562086) and two metabolites, BMS-749241 and DPH-123554, in human plasma. These assays were linear from 1.00 to 1000 or 2.00 to 2000ng/mL for each analyte with excellent assay accuracy, precision and reproducibility. These assays met acceptance criteria for regulated bioanalysis and have been successfully applied to drug development study samples. The methodology described here successfully eliminated all manual intervention steps achieving fully automated sample preparation without compromising assay performance. Importantly, this methodology eliminates the potential exposure of the bioanalyst to any infectious biofluids during sample preparation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2013.01.028DOI Listing
March 2013

Simultaneous determination of a selective adenosine 2A agonist, BMS-068645, and its acid metabolite in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry--evaluation of the esterase inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, in the stabilization of a labile ester-containing drug.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2007 Jun 13;852(1-2):77-84. Epub 2007 Jan 13.

Bioanalytical Sciences Department, Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Route 206 and Province Line Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08640, USA.

BMS-068645 is a selective adenosine 2A agonist that contains a methyl ester group which undergoes esterase hydrolysis to its acid metabolite. To permit accurate determinations of circulating BMS-068645 and its acid metabolite, blood samples must be rapidly stabilized at the time of collection. A sensitive, rapid and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantitation of BMS-068645 and its acid metabolite in human plasma has been developed and validated using diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) as the esterase inhibitor to prevent BMS-068645 from converting to its acid metabolite. The D(5)-stable isotope labeled analogs of BMS-068645 and its metabolite were used as the internal standards (IS). Analytes and IS in plasma containing 20 mM DFP were acidified and extracted into methyl tert-butyl ether. The liquid-liquid extraction effectively eliminated the strong matrix effect caused by the esterase inhibitor. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Atlantis C18 column with a run time of 4 min. Detection was performed on a Sciex API 4000 with positive ion electrospray mode (ESI/MS/MS), monitoring the ion transitions m/z 487>314 and 473>300 for BMS-068645 and its acid metabolite, respectively. The method was validated over the range from 0.020 to 10.0 ng/mL for BMS-068645 and 0.050 to 10.0 ng/mL for its acid metabolite. Inter- and intra-run precision for the quality control samples during validation were less than 8.7% and 4.0%, respectively, for the two analytes. The assay accuracy was within +/-5.4% of the nominal values. The esterase inhibitor effectively stabilized BMS-068645 during blood collection and storage. Blood collection tubes containing DFP were easily prepared and used at the clinical sites and could be stored at -30 degrees C for 3 months. This method demonstrated adequate sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, precision, stability and ruggedness to support the analysis of human plasma samples in pharmacokinetic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2006.12.054DOI Listing
June 2007

Recent developments in electrochemical detection for microchip capillary electrophoresis.

Electrophoresis 2004 Nov;25(21-22):3528-49

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047, USA.

Significant progress in the development of miniaturized microfluidic systems has occurred since their inception over a decade ago. This is primarily due to the numerous advantages of microchip analysis, including the ability to analyze minute samples, speed of analysis, reduced cost and waste, and portability. This review focuses on recent developments in integrating electrochemical (EC) detection with microchip capillary electrophoresis (CE). These detection modes include amperometry, conductimetry, and potentiometry. EC detection is ideal for use with microchip CE systems because it can be easily miniaturized with no diminution in analytical performance. Advances in microchip format, electrode material and design, decoupling of the detector from the separation field, and integration of sample preparation, separation, and detection on-chip are discussed. Microchip CEEC applications for enzyme/immunoassays, clinical and environmental assays, as well as the detection of neurotransmitters are also described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/elps.200406115DOI Listing
November 2004