Publications by authors named "Stephanie Frahm"

2 Publications

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De novo insertions and deletions of predominantly paternal origin are associated with autism spectrum disorder.

Cell Rep 2014 Oct 2;9(1):16-23. Epub 2014 Oct 2.

Center for Bioinformatics, State Key Laboratory of Protein and Plant Gene Research, School of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China; National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies have demonstrated the contribution of de novo loss-of-function single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, challenges in the reliable detection of de novo insertions and deletions (indels) have limited inclusion of these variants in prior analyses. By applying a robust indel detection method to WES data from 787 ASD families (2,963 individuals), we demonstrate that de novo frameshift indels contribute to ASD risk (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.0-2.7; p = 0.03), are more common in female probands (p = 0.02), are enriched among genes encoding FMRP targets (p = 6 × 10(-9)), and arise predominantly on the paternal chromosome (p < 0.001). On the basis of mutation rates in probands versus unaffected siblings, we conclude that de novo frameshift indels contribute to risk in approximately 3% of individuals with ASD. Finally, by observing clustering of mutations in unrelated probands, we uncover two ASD-associated genes: KMT2E (MLL5), a chromatin regulator, and RIMS1, a regulator of synaptic vesicle release.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.08.068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4194132PMC
October 2014

Multiple recurrent de novo CNVs, including duplications of the 7q11.23 Williams syndrome region, are strongly associated with autism.

Neuron 2011 Jun;70(5):863-85

Program on Neurogenetics, Yale University School of Medicine, 230 South Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

We have undertaken a genome-wide analysis of rare copy-number variation (CNV) in 1124 autism spectrum disorder (ASD) families, each comprised of a single proband, unaffected parents, and, in most kindreds, an unaffected sibling. We find significant association of ASD with de novo duplications of 7q11.23, where the reciprocal deletion causes Williams-Beuren syndrome, characterized by a highly social personality. We identify rare recurrent de novo CNVs at five additional regions, including 16p13.2 (encompassing genes USP7 and C16orf72) and Cadherin 13, and implement a rigorous approach to evaluating the statistical significance of these observations. Overall, large de novo CNVs, particularly those encompassing multiple genes, confer substantial risks (OR = 5.6; CI = 2.6-12.0, p = 2.4 × 10(-7)). We estimate there are 130-234 ASD-related CNV regions in the human genome and present compelling evidence, based on cumulative data, for association of rare de novo events at 7q11.23, 15q11.2-13.1, 16p11.2, and Neurexin 1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2011.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3939065PMC
June 2011