Publications by authors named "Stephanie A Schuette"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Do interoceptive accuracy and interoceptive sensibility predict emotion regulation?

Psychol Res 2020 Jun 16. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA.

Introduction: Interoception refers to awareness, interpretation, and integration of sensations in the body. While interoceptive accuracy has long been regarded as a core component of emotional experience, less is known about the relationship of interoceptive accuracy and related facets of interoception to emotion regulation deficits. This study explores how interoceptive accuracy and interoceptive sensibility relate to emotion regulation in a non-clinical sample.

Methods: Undergraduate participants completed a heartbeat perception task and the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (Noticing and Body Listening sub-scales), and rated their confidence in performance on the heartbeat perception task. Participants also completed self-report measures of emotional awareness and regulation (Profile of Emotional Competence, intrapersonal emotion identification and emotion regulation sub-scales), and rated their use of different coping strategies (Brief COPE).

Results: Noticing predicted emotion identification, emotion regulation, and the use of adaptive but not maladaptive coping strategies. Heartbeat perception accuracy did not significantly contribute to the prediction of any outcome variables.

Discussion: Future work is needed to extend these findings to clinical populations. The results from this study support the use of interoceptive training interventions to promote emotional wellbeing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00426-020-01369-2DOI Listing
June 2020

Positive affect and medication adherence in chronic conditions: A systematic review.

Health Psychol 2019 Nov 1;38(11):960-974. Epub 2019 Aug 1.

Department of Medical Social Science.

Objective: This review aims to inform research and clinical care on the current state of knowledge on the relationship between positive affect and medication adherence.

Method: Searches were carried out in PsycINFO, PubMed MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, and Embase. There were no limits on study type, publication date, language, or participant demographics. Studies reporting a relationship between positive affect and medication adherence were eligible for inclusion if positive affect was measured prior to or concurrently with medication adherence.

Results: Nine studies met inclusion criteria. All studies were prospective cohort or cross-sectional and examined positive affect and medication adherence in people living with HIV or cardiovascular conditions. The majority of results indicated positive associations between positive affect and medication adherence, with Cohen's effect sizes ranging from -0.40 to 1.27.

Conclusions: Consistent with previous theoretical work, this systematic review provides evidence of a link between positive affect and improved medication adherence. Better measurement of both affect and medication adherence across chronic conditions is an important focus for future research and will inform targeted interventions to improve adherence and, ultimately, decrease the morbidity, mortality, and cost associated with suboptimal adherence in chronic physical conditions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000778DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6800780PMC
November 2019

The MARIGOLD study: Feasibility and enhancement of an online intervention to improve emotion regulation in people with elevated depressive symptoms.

J Affect Disord 2019 10 5;257:352-364. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Department of Medical Social Sciences, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: This manuscript describes the first two phases of pilot testing MARIGOLD, an online self-guided positive emotion skills intervention for adults with elevated depressive symptoms, along with enhancements to overcome retention and adherence problems reported in previous research.

Methods: Adults with elevated depressive symptoms were recruited online and assessed at baseline, post-intervention, 1- and 3-month follow-up. Phase 1 participants (n = 58) were randomized to MARIGOLD, daily emotion reporting, or waitlist. Phase 2 participants (n = 79) were randomized to MARIGOLD plus one enhancement: online discussion board (ODB), virtual badges (VB), or facilitator contact (FC). Post-intervention interviews assessed acceptability. Intention-to-treat analyses examined retention, adherence, and preliminary efficacy.

Results: In both phases, retention and adherence did not differ between groups. MARIGOLD skills were highly acceptable, but qualitative results indicate web-based features (e.g., log-in, ODB, VB) require refinement prior to larger testing. Neither phase demonstrated between-group differences in preliminary efficacy. In Phase 1 within-group analyses, MARIGOLD and emotion reporting control demonstrated a similar pattern of findings (stable depressive symptoms, increased positive emotion, decreased negative emotion and stress), whereas the waitlist group significantly increased in depressive mood. Most Phase 2 within-group analyses demonstrated the expected pattern of results (i.e., decreases in PHQ-8 and negative emotion, increases in positive emotion). However, CES-D scores were stable in FC; perceived stress was stable in FC and ODB.

Limitations: This pilot study is not powered to evaluate efficacy.

Conclusion: Positive emotion skills, plus enhancements for web-based, self-guided delivery, warrant additional study in people with elevated depressive symptoms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6711819PMC
October 2019

A Self-Paced, Web-Based, Positive Emotion Skills Intervention for Reducing Symptoms of Depression: Protocol for Development and Pilot Testing of MARIGOLD.

JMIR Res Protoc 2018 Jun 5;7(6):e10494. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Department of Medical Social Sciences, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States.

Background: Living with elevated symptoms of depression can have debilitating consequences for an individual's psychosocial and physical functioning, quality of life, and health care utilization. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that skills for increasing positive emotion can be helpful to individuals with depression. Although Web-based interventions to reduce negative emotion in individuals with depression are available, these interventions frequently suffer from poor retention and adherence and do not capitalize on the potential benefits of increasing positive emotion.

Objective: The aim of this study was to develop and test a Web-based positive emotion skills intervention tailored for individuals living with elevated depressive symptoms, as well as to develop and test enhancement strategies for increasing retention and adherence to that intervention.

Methods: This study protocol describes the development and testing for Mobile Affect Regulation Intervention with the Goal of Lowering Depression (MARIGOLD), a Web-based positive emotion skills intervention, adapted for individuals with elevated depressive symptomatology. The intervention development is taking place in three phases. In phase 1, we are tailoring an existing positive emotion skills intervention for individuals with elevated symptoms of depression and are pilot testing the tailored version of the intervention in a randomized controlled trial with two control conditions (N=60). In phase 2, we are developing and testing three enhancements aimed at boosting retention and adherence to the Web-based intervention (N=75): facilitator contact, an online discussion board, and virtual badges. In phase 3, we are conducting a multifactorial, nine-arm pilot trial (N=600) to systematically test these enhancement strategies, individually and in combination. The primary outcome is depressive symptom severity. Secondary outcomes include positive and negative emotion, psychological well-being, and coping resources.

Results: The project was funded in August 2014, and data collection was completed in May 2018. Data analysis is currently under way, and the first results are expected to be submitted for publication in 2018.

Conclusions: Findings from this investigation will enable us to develop an optimal package of intervention content and enhancement strategies for individuals with elevated symptoms of depression. If this intervention proves to be effective, it will provide a cost-effective, anonymous, appealing, and flexible approach for reducing symptoms of depression and improving psychological adjustment through increasing positive emotion.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01964820 (Phase 1); https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01964820 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6zpmKBcyX). ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02861755 (Phase 2); https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02861755 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6zpmLmy8k).

Registered Report Identifier: RR1-10.2196/10494.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/10494DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6008514PMC
June 2018

Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Third-Trimester Depressive Symptoms in a Healthy Privately Insured Sample.

AJP Rep 2018 Jan 5;8(1):e13-e17. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

 While being overweight (body mass index [BMI] >25) prior to pregnancy is linked to antenatal depression, whether weight is confounded by socioeconomic and/or medical risks is unclear.  We assessed 66 healthy privately insured pregnant women at M = 35.0 ± 3.3 weeks for symptoms of depression (Inventory for Depressive Symptoms-Self-Report (IDS-SR 30), lifetime history of depression and other psychiatric conditions (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview), and pre-pregnancy BMI derived from pre-pregnancy weight (by recall) and directly measured height. Pre-pregnancy overweight (BMI > 25) and antenatal depression (score of mild or greater [14] on the IDS-SR 30) were assessed using logistic regression, controlling for past major depressive disorder (MDD) and demographic factors showing significant between group differences.  Pre-pregnancy overweight (  = 17; 25.8%) was associated with an increased risk of third trimester depression, independent of past MDD and marital status (odds ratio = 7.47; 95% confidence interval [2.09-26.68]; (standard error) = 2.010 [0.650]).  Replication in a larger sample is suggested to confirm an independent effect of pregravid overweight on third trimester depression.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1625974DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5798992PMC
January 2018

A Scoping Review of Positive Lifestyle and Wellness Interventions to Inform the Development of a Comprehensive Health Promotion Program: "HealthPro".

Am J Lifestyle Med 2019 Jul-Aug;13(4):336-346. Epub 2017 May 5.

Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (SAPS, EC, KS, ELA, DV).

. Lifestyle medicine has emerged as a transformational force in mainstream health care. Numerous health promotion and wellness programs have been created to facilitate the adoption of increased positive, modifiable health behaviors to prevent and lessen the effects of chronic disease. This article provides a scoping review of available health promotion interventions that focus on healthy adult populations in the past 10 years. . We conducted a scoping review of the literature searching for health promotion interventions in the past 10 years. Interventions were limited to those conducted among healthy adults that offered a face-to-face, group-based format, with positive results on one or more health outcomes. We then developed a new health promotion intervention that draws on multiple components of included interventions. . Fifty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria. Physical activity was the primary focus of a majority (N = 47) of articles, followed by diet/nutrition (N = 40) and coping/social support (N = 40). . Efficacious health promotion interventions are critical to address the prevention of chronic disease by addressing modifiable risk factors such as exercise, nutrition, stress, and coping. A new intervention, discussed is this article, provides a comprehensive approaches to health behavior change and may be adapted for future research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1559827617704825DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6600616PMC
May 2017

Perspectives from Patients and Healthcare Providers on the Practice of Maternal Placentophagy.

J Altern Complement Med 2017 Jan 17;23(1):60-67. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

3 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine , Chicago, IL.

Purpose: Placentophagy (maternal consumption of the placenta) has become increasingly prevalent in the past decade among women seeking to promote health and healing during the postpartum period. The purpose of this study was to assess patient and provider familiarity with and attitudes toward placentophagy, as well as patients' willingness to try placentophagy.

Methods: Two cross-sectional surveys with questions regarding placentophagy practice were distributed to healthcare providers and patients. The provider survey was distributed via email listservers to international perinatal professional organizations and to obstetrics and gynecology, nurse midwifery, family medicine, and psychiatry departments at three urban hospitals. Patient surveys were administered in person at an urban hospital in Chicago, Illinois.

Results: Approximately two thirds (66%; n = 100) of patients and most (89%; n = 161) of providers were familiar with placentophagy. Patients with a history of a self-reported mental health disorder were more likely to be willing to consider placentophagy and to believe that healthcare providers should discuss it with their patients.

Conclusions: Most providers and patients have heard of placentophagy but are unsure of its benefits and/or risks. Further research examining the potential therapeutic efficacy and/or risks of placentophagy is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2016.0147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6913118PMC
January 2017

Interaction of oxytocin level and past depression may predict postpartum depressive symptom severity.

Arch Womens Ment Health 2016 10 8;19(5):799-808. Epub 2016 Mar 8.

The Kinsey Institute and Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.

We examined plasma oxytocin concentration and postpartum depression (PPD) symptom severity in women who were not depressed during pregnancy and whether this differed by major depressive disorder (MDD) history. We assessed psychiatric history and plasma oxytocin in 66 healthy pregnant women in the third trimester (M = 35 ± 3 weeks) and depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum (M = 5.9 ± 0.8 weeks). Linear regression analysis was used to examine oxytocin and PPD symptom severity and moderation of oxytocin and PPD by past MDD. Women with (n = 13) and without (n = 53) past MDD differed in third trimester depressive symptom severity, but not oxytocin level, demographic factors, or birth outcomes. Controlling for third trimester depressive symptoms, oxytocin level was unrelated to PPD symptom severity [B(SE) = -.019 (.084); β = -.025; t = -.227; p = .821]. However, oxytocin level interacted with past MDD to predict PPD symptom severity [B(SE) = 7.489 (2.429); β = .328; t = 3.084; p = .003]. Higher oxytocin predicted greater PPD symptom severity in women with past MDD (p = .019), but not in women without (p = .216). Replication in a larger sample and methodologic challenges are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00737-016-0616-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5016208PMC
October 2016

PLASMA OXYTOCIN CONCENTRATION AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT EVIDENCE AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH.

Depress Anxiety 2016 Apr 12;33(4):316-22. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

There is substantial recent interest in the role of oxytocin in social and affiliative behaviors-animal models of depression have suggested a link between oxytocin and mood. We reviewed literature to date for evidence of a potential relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms in humans. Pubmed(®) and PsychINFO(®) were searched for biomedical and social sciences literature from 1960 to May 19, 2015 for empirical articles in English involving human subjects focused on the relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms, excluding articles on the oxytocin receptor gene, or involving exogenous (i.e. intranasal) administration of oxytocin. Eight studies meeting criteria were identified and formally reviewed. Studies of pregnant women suggested an inverse relationship between oxytocin level and depressive symptom severity. Findings in nonpregnant women were broadly consistent with the role of oxytocin release in response to stress supported by animal studies. The relationship between oxytocin and depression in men appeared to be in the opposite direction, possibly reflecting the influence of gonadal hormones on oxytocinergic functioning found in other mammalian species. Overall, small sample sizes, heterogeneity in study designs, and other methodological limitations may account for inconsistent findings. Future research utilizing reliable oxytocin measurement protocols including measurements across time, larger sample sizes, and sample homogeneity with respect to multiple possible confounders (age, gender, race and ethnicity, ovarian status among women, and psychosocial context) are needed to elucidate the role of oxytocin in the pathogenesis of depression, and could guide the design of novel pharmacologic agents.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22467DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4818702PMC
April 2016