Publications by authors named "Stefanie Poll"

6 Publications

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Elevated expression of complement C4 in the mouse prefrontal cortex causes schizophrenia-associated phenotypes.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Apr 9. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

INSERM UMR-S 1270, Paris, France.

Accumulating evidence supports immune involvement in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, a severe psychiatric disorder. In particular, high expression variants of C4, a gene of the innate immune complement system, were shown to confer susceptibility to schizophrenia. However, how elevated C4 expression may impact brain circuits remains largely unknown. We used in utero electroporation to overexpress C4 in the mouse prefrontal cortex. We found reduced glutamatergic input to pyramidal cells of juvenile and adult, but not of newborn C4-overexpressing (C4-OE) mice, together with decreased spine density, which mirrors spine loss observed in the schizophrenic cortex. Using time-lapse two-photon imaging in vivo, we observed that these deficits were associated with decreased dendritic spine gain and elimination in juvenile C4-OE mice, which may reflect poor formation and/or stabilization of immature spines. In juvenile and adult C4-OE mice, we found evidence for NMDA receptor hypofunction, another schizophrenia-associated phenotype, and synaptic accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. Alterations in cortical GABAergic networks have been repeatedly associated with schizophrenia. We found that functional GABAergic transmission was reduced in C4-OE mice, in line with diminished GABA release probability from parvalbumin interneurons, lower GAD67 expression, and decreased intrinsic excitability in parvalbumin interneurons. These cellular abnormalities were associated with working memory impairment. Our results substantiate the causal relationship between an immunogenetic risk factor and several distinct cortical endophenotypes of schizophrenia and shed light on the underlying cellular mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01081-6DOI Listing
April 2021

Memory trace interference impairs recall in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

Nat Neurosci 2020 08 8;23(8):952-958. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Neuroimmunology and Imaging Group, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hippocampus-dependent memories underlie an extensive decline. The neuronal ensemble encoding a memory, termed engram, is partially recapitulated during memory recall. Artificial activation of an engram can restore memory in a mouse model of early AD, but its fate and the factors that render the engram nonfunctional are yet to be revealed. Here, we used repeated two-photon in vivo imaging to analyze fosGFP transgenic mice (which express enhanced GFP under the Fos promoter) performing a hippocampus-dependent memory task. We found that partial reactivation of the CA1 engram during recall is preserved under AD-like conditions. However, we identified a novelty-like ensemble that interfered with the engram and thus compromised recall. Mimicking a novelty-like ensemble in healthy mice was sufficient to affect memory recall. In turn, reducing the novelty-like signal rescued the recall impairment under AD-like conditions. These findings suggest a novel mechanistic process that contributes to the deterioration of memories in AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41593-020-0652-4DOI Listing
August 2020

Tagger-A Swiss army knife for multiomics to dissect cell type-specific mechanisms of gene expression in mice.

PLoS Biol 2019 08 8;17(8):e3000374. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

A deep understanding of how regulation of the multiple levels of gene expression in mammalian tissues give rise to complex phenotypes has been impeded by cellular diversity. A handful of techniques were developed to tag-select nucleic acids of interest in specific cell types, thereby enabling their capture. We expanded this strategy by developing the Tagger knock-in mouse line bearing a quad-cistronic transgene combining enrichment tools for nuclei, nascent RNA, translating mRNA, and mature microRNA (miRNA). We demonstrate that Tagger can capture the desired nucleic acids, enabling multiple omics approaches to be applied to specific cell types in vivo using a single transgenic mouse line.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000374DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6701817PMC
August 2019

Chronic 2P-STED imaging reveals high turnover of dendritic spines in the hippocampus in vivo.

Elife 2018 06 22;7. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Interdisciplinary Institute for Neuroscience, CNRS UMR 5297, Bordeaux, France.

Rewiring neural circuits by the formation and elimination of synapses is thought to be a key cellular mechanism of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic structural component of excitatory synapses, and their experience-dependent plasticity has been extensively studied in mouse superficial cortex using two-photon microscopy in vivo. By contrast, very little is known about spine plasticity in the hippocampus, which is the archetypical memory center of the brain, mostly because it is difficult to visualize dendritic spines in this deeply embedded structure with sufficient spatial resolution. We developed chronic 2P-STED microscopy in mouse hippocampus, using a 'hippocampal window' based on resection of cortical tissue and a long working distance objective for optical access. We observed a two-fold higher spine density than previous studies and measured a spine turnover of ~40% within 4 days, which depended on spine size. We thus provide direct evidence for a high level of structural rewiring of synaptic circuits and new insights into the structure-dynamics relationship of hippocampal spines. Having established chronic super-resolution microscopy in the hippocampus in vivo, our study enables longitudinal and correlative analyses of nanoscale neuroanatomical structures with genetic, molecular and behavioral experiments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.34700DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6014725PMC
June 2018

P2Y1 receptor blockade normalizes network dysfunction and cognition in an Alzheimer's disease model.

J Exp Med 2018 06 3;215(6):1649-1663. Epub 2018 May 3.

German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Bonn, Germany

Astrocytic hyperactivity is an important contributor to neuronal-glial network dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown that astrocyte hyperactivity is mediated by signaling through the P2Y1 purinoreceptor (P2Y1R) pathway. Using the APPPS1 mouse model of AD, we here find that chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of P2Y1R inhibitors normalizes astroglial and neuronal network dysfunction, as measured by in vivo two-photon microscopy, augments structural synaptic integrity, and preserves hippocampal long-term potentiation. These effects occur independently from β-amyloid metabolism or plaque burden but are associated with a higher morphological complexity of periplaque reactive astrocytes, as well as reduced dystrophic neurite burden and greater plaque compaction. Importantly, APPPS1 mice chronically treated with P2Y1R antagonists, as well as APPPS1 mice carrying an astrocyte-specific genetic deletion (Ip3r2) of signaling pathways downstream of P2Y1R activation, are protected from the decline of spatial learning and memory. In summary, our study establishes the restoration of network homoeostasis by P2Y1R inhibition as a novel treatment target in AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20171487DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5987918PMC
June 2018

Dysfunction of Somatostatin-Positive Interneurons Associated with Memory Deficits in an Alzheimer's Disease Model.

Neuron 2016 Oct 15;92(1):114-125. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

Neuroimmunology and Imaging Group, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn, Germany. Electronic address:

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive decline and neuronal network dysfunction, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In the hippocampus, microcircuit activity during learning and memory processes is tightly controlled by O-LM interneurons. Here, we investigated the effect of beta-amyloidosis on O-LM interneuron structural and functional connectivity, combining two-photon in vivo imaging of synaptic morphology, awake Ca imaging, and retrograde mono-transsynaptic rabies tracing. We find severely impaired synaptic rewiring that occurs on the O-LM interneuron input and output level in a mouse model of AD. Synaptic rewiring that occurs upon fear learning on O-LM interneuron input level is affected in mice with AD-like pathology. This process requires the release of acetylcholine from septo-hippocampal projections. We identify decreased cholinergic action on O-LM interneurons in APP/PS1 mice as a key pathomechanism that contributes to memory impairment in a mouse model, with potential relevance for human AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2016.08.034DOI Listing
October 2016