Publications by authors named "Stefan Serban"

4 Publications

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A local dental network approach to COVID-19 pandemic: innovation through collaboration.

Prim Dent J 2020 Dec 11:2050168420980979. Epub 2020 Dec 11.

Consultant in Dental Public Health, Yorkshire & Humber, Public Health England, United Kingdom.

Structure: We present the principles for selecting and initiating hubs, the integration with secondary care services and the supply of personal protective equipment.

Process: The main elements are communication, the development of referral processes to manage complex cases and data collection.

Outcome: Through work with local dental stakeholders, 23 clusters and 36 hubs were set up covering a large geographical area.The integrated network of hubs and clusters has strengthened collaboration between providers and policy makers. Various leadership approaches facilitated the readiness for the transition to recovery. The new local collaborative structures could be used to support local programmes such as flexible commissioning, peer-led learning and integration with primary care networks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050168420980979DOI Listing
December 2020

The Dental Team: An Additional Resource for Delivering Vaccinations.

Front Med (Lausanne) 2020 6;7:606242. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

School of Dentistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2020.606242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7677565PMC
November 2020

Multimorbidity: a challenge and opportunity for the dental profession.

Br Dent J 2020 09 11;229(5):282-286. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

School of Dentistry, University of Leeds, Clarendon Way, Leeds, LS2 9LU, UK.

Multimorbidity (the coexistence of two or more chronic conditions) is common, is likely to be on the increase and has a major impact on quality of life, increased risk of mortality, and significant financial costs to the health and social care system. Multimorbidity is strongly associated with increasing age and is also directly linked to socioeconomic status. A substantial body of scientific evidence has shown an association between specific oral diseases and a range of other health conditions. Less is known, however, about the inter-relationships between oral diseases and multiple other health conditions. As multimorbidity is increasingly becoming the norm, rather than the exception, a profound shift is now needed in the training of oral health professionals, and the practice and delivery of dental care. A more integrated and coordinated approach to training and care is needed, which will require radical system-level reform and redesign of how health and dental services are commissioned, delivered and financed. Truly multidisciplinary teamwork requires system reform to facilitate effective joint working. The pattern of disease in society is changing and the dental profession needs to respond accordingly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41415-020-2056-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7485176PMC
September 2020

Dysbiotic Subgingival Microbial Communities in Periodontally Healthy Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2018 07 21;70(7):1008-1013. Epub 2018 May 21.

The Ohio State University, Columbus.

Objective: Studies that demonstrate an association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and dysbiotic oral microbiomes are often confounded by the presence of extensive periodontitis in these individuals. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of RA in modulating the periodontal microbiome by comparing periodontally healthy individuals with RA to those without RA.

Methods: Subgingival plaque was collected from periodontally healthy individuals (22 with RA and 19 without RA), and the 16S gene was sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq platform. Bacterial biodiversity and co-occurrence patterns were examined using the QIIME and PhyloToAST pipelines.

Results: The subgingival microbiomes differed significantly between patients with RA and controls based on both community membership and the abundance of lineages, with 41.9% of the community differing in abundance and 19% in membership. In contrast to the sparse and predominantly congeneric co-occurrence networks seen in controls, RA patients revealed a highly connected grid containing a large intergeneric hub anchored by known periodontal pathogens. Predictive metagenomic analysis (PICRUSt) demonstrated that arachidonic acid and ester lipid metabolism pathways might partly explain the robustness of this clustering. As expected from a periodontally healthy cohort, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were not significantly different between groups; however, Cryptobacterium curtum, another organism capable of producing large amounts of citrulline, emerged as a robust discriminant of the microbiome in individuals with RA.

Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that the oral microbiome in RA is enriched for inflammophilic and citrulline-producing organisms, which may play a role in the production of autoantigenic citrullinated peptides in RA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40485DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6019644PMC
July 2018