Publications by authors named "Stavros Pavlou"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nitrate removal from groundwater using a batch and continuous flow hybrid Fe-electrocoagulation and electrooxidation system.

J Environ Manage 2021 Nov 28;297:113387. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Rio, GR-26504, Patras, Greece; Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, GR-26504, Patras, Greece.

During the last two decades nitrate contaminated groundwater has become an extensive worldwide problem with wide-reaching negative effects on human health and the environment. In this study, a combination of electrocoagulation (EC) and electrooxidation (EO) was studied as a denitrification process to efficiently remove nitrates and ammonium (a by-product produced during EC) from real polluted groundwater. Initially, EC experiments under batch operating mode were performed using iron electrodes at different applied current density values (20-40 mA cm). Nitrate percentage removal of 100 % was recorded, however high ammonium concentrations were performed (4.5-6.5 mg NH-Ν L). Therefore, a continuous flow system was examined for the complete removal of both nitrates and EC-generated ammonium cations. The system comprised an EC reactor, a settling tank and an EO reactor. The applied current densities to the EC process were the same as those in the batch experiments, while the volumetric flow rates were 4, 6 and 8 mL min. Regarding the current density of the EO process was kept constant at the value of 75 mA cm. The percentage nitrate removal recorded during the EC process ranged between 52.0 and 100 %, while the NH-N concentration at the outlet of the EO reduced significantly (53-100 %) depending on the applied current density and the volumetric flow rate. Also, the dissolved iron concentration in the treated water was always below the legislated limit of 0.2 mg L (up to 0.027 mg L). These results indicate that the proposed hybrid system is capable of denitrifying real nitrate contaminated groundwater without generating toxic by-products, therefore making the water suitable for human consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.113387DOI Listing
November 2021

Data on cellular lipids of grown on fatty substrates.

Data Brief 2018 Dec 28;21:1037-1044. Epub 2018 Oct 28.

Unit of Microbiology, Division of Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece.

, which is model oleaginous yeast with high industrial interest, was cultivated on fatty substrates. Data concerning fatty acid composition of both substrate and yeast lipids and comparisons of the experimental data with model predictions presented in "Biomodification of fats and oils and scenarios of adding value on renewable fatty materials through microbial fermentations: Modelling and trials with " (Vasiliadou et al., 2018) were provided. Furthermore, the total yeast lipids were fractionated into their main fractions, that is, phospholipids, glucolipids plus sphingolipids and neutral lipids, and the fatty acid composition of each lipid fraction was reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2018.10.116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6226593PMC
December 2018

Mathematical modeling of olive mill waste composting process.

Waste Manag 2015 Sep 11;43:61-71. Epub 2015 Jul 11.

Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences, FORTH, Stadiou Str., Platani, GR-26504 Patras, Greece; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras, Greece.

The present study aimed at developing an integrated mathematical model for the composting process of olive mill waste. The multi-component model was developed to simulate the composting of three-phase olive mill solid waste with olive leaves and different materials as bulking agents. The modeling system included heat transfer, organic substrate degradation, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, water content change, and biological processes. First-order kinetics were used to describe the hydrolysis of insoluble organic matter, followed by formation of biomass. Microbial biomass growth was modeled with a double-substrate limitation by hydrolyzed available organic substrate and oxygen using Monod kinetics. The inhibitory factors of temperature and moisture content were included in the system. The production and consumption of nitrogen and phosphorous were also included in the model. In order to evaluate the kinetic parameters, and to validate the model, six pilot-scale composting experiments in controlled laboratory conditions were used. Low values of hydrolysis rates were observed (0.002841/d) coinciding with the high cellulose and lignin content of the composting materials used. Model simulations were in good agreement with the experimental results. Sensitivity analysis was performed and the modeling efficiency was determined to further evaluate the model predictions. Results revealed that oxygen simulations were more sensitive on the input parameters of the model compared to those of water, temperature and insoluble organic matter. Finally, the Nash and Sutcliff index (E), showed that the experimental data of insoluble organic matter (E>0.909) and temperature (E>0.678) were better simulated than those of water.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2015.06.038DOI Listing
September 2015

Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal.

J Hazard Mater 2015 Jan 13;281:95-105. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio, Greece; Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras, Greece.

In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5-110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m(2)d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.08.004DOI Listing
January 2015

Modelling of biological Cr(VI) removal in draw-fill reactors using microorganisms in suspended and attached growth systems.

Water Res 2013 Feb 2;47(2):623-36. Epub 2012 Nov 2.

Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Western Greece, 2 Seferi Str., 30100 Agrinio, Greece.

The kinetics of hexavalent chromium bio-reduction in draw-fill suspended and attached growth reactors was examined using sugar as substrate and indigenous microorganisms from the industrial sludge of the Hellenic Aerospace Industry. Initially, experiments in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr (VI) concentrations of 1.4-110 mg/l were carried out, to extensively study the behaviour of a mixed culture. The maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate of 2 mg/l h was achieved for initial concentration 12.85 mg/l with biomass production rate 4.1 mg biomass/l h. Analysis of the microbial structure in the batch reactor culture indicated that the dominant bacterial communities were constituted by bacterial members of Raoultella sp., Citrobacter sp., Klebsiella sp., Salmonella sp., Achromobacter sp. and Kerstersia sp. while the dominant fungal strain was that of Pichia jadinii. Experiments using the same mixed culture were also carried out in packed-bed reactors with plastic support media. High removal rates were achieved (2.0 mg/l h) even in high initial concentrations (109 mg/l). A combination of the model of Tsao and Hanson for growth enhancement and that of Aiba and Shoda for growth inhibition was used in order to describe and predict the process of Cr(VI) bio-reduction in suspended growth and packed-bed reactors. Kinetic constants of the equation obtained from both batch (or draw-fill) culture experiments. In the draw-fill experiments at the packed-bed reactor, hexavalent chromium inhibitory effects were minimized increasing the inhibitory constant value K(i)' at 148.5 mg/l, compared to suspended growth experiments which was K(i) = 8.219 mg/l. The model adequately predicts hexavalent chromium reduction in both batch reactors for all initial concentrations tested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.10.034DOI Listing
February 2013

Complex dynamics of microbial competition in the gradostat.

J Biotechnol 2009 Jan 3;139(1):38-46. Epub 2008 Sep 3.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras, Greece.

We examine the conditions necessary for the emergence of complex dynamic behavior in systems of microbial competition. In particular, we study the effect of spatial heterogeneity and substrate-inhibition on the dynamics of such a system. This is accomplished through the study of a mathematical model of two microbial populations competing for a single nutrient in a configuration of two interconnected chemostats. Microbial growth is assumed to follow substrate-inhibited kinetics for both species. Such a system with sterile feed has been shown in a previous work to exhibit stable periodic states. In the present work we study the system for the case of non-sterile feed, i.e., when the two species are present in the feed of the chemostats. The analysis is done by numerical bifurcation theory methods. We demonstrate that, in addition to periodic states, the system possesses stable quasi-periodic states resulting from Neimark-Sacker bifurcations of limit cycles. Also, periodic states may undergo successive period doublings leading to periodic states of increasing period and indicating that chaotic states might be possible. Multistability is also observed, consisting in the coexistence of several stable steady states and possibly stable periodic or quasi-periodic states for given operating conditions. It appears that substrate-inhibition, spatial heterogeneity and presence of microorganisms in the inflow are all necessary conditions for complex dynamics to arise in a microbial system of pure and simple competition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiotec.2008.08.006DOI Listing
January 2009
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