Publications by authors named "Sridhar Pinnamaneni"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Virtual Shoulder Physical Exam.

HSS J 2021 Feb 21;17(1):59-64. Epub 2021 Feb 21.

Sports Medicine Institute, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York City, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1556331620975033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8077973PMC
February 2021

The Virtual Shoulder and Knee Physical Examination.

Orthop J Sports Med 2020 Oct 20;8(10):2325967120962869. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Sports Medicine Institute, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA.

The COVID-19 crisis has forced a sudden and dramatic shift in the way that clinicians interact with their patients, from outpatient encounters to telehealth visits utilizing a variety of internet-based videoconferencing applications. Although many aspects of pre-COVID-19 outpatient sports medicine care will ultimately resume, it is likely that telehealth will persist because of its practicality and because of patient demand for access to efficient and convenient health care. Physical examination is widely considered a critical obstacle to a thorough evaluation of sports medicine patients during telehealth visits. However, a closer reflection suggests that a majority of the examination maneuvers are possible virtually with limited, if any, modifications. Thus, we provide a comprehensive shoulder and knee physical examination for sports medicine telehealth visits, including (1) verbal instructions in layman's terms that can be provided to the patient before or read verbatim during the visit, (2) multimedia options (narrated videos and annotated presentations) of the shoulder and knee examination that can be provided to patients via screen-share options, and (3) a corresponding checklist to aid in documentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967120962869DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7871077PMC
October 2020

Computed Tomography-Based Preoperative Planning Provides a Pathology and Morphology-Specific Approach to Glenohumeral Instability With Bone Loss.

Arthroscopy 2021 Jun 27;37(6):1757-1766.e2. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Sports Medicine Institute, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To use computed tomography (CT) to determine a reproducible method of coracoid measurement to compare the ability of the classic Latarjet technique and the congruent arc modification (CAM) to restore native glenoid diameter and to develop a preoperative planning algorithm for glenoid restoration with a goal of achieving an on-track shoulder.

Methods: Coracoid dimensions were measured on multiplanar reconstructed shoulder CT scans of patients aged 18 to 45 years obtained between December 1, 2019, and March 13, 2020. Patients were excluded if CT demonstrated osteophyte formation, glenoid dysplasia, coracoid fracture, or tumor. The proportion of glenoid diameter able to be restored using classic Latarjet technique and CAM were calculated. A treatment algorithm was proposed considering the amount of bone loss present and coracoid dimensions.

Results: Coracoid dimensions of 117 consecutive patients were measured and varied considerably (length: 17.5-31.8 mm, width: 9.1-20.5 mm, thickness: 6.1-15.7 mm). While most patients had harvestable coracoid length ≥20 mm (male: 96.3% vs female: 94.4%, P = .65), only 27.8% of female patients had coracoid thickness ≥10 mm. When comparing Latarjet techniques, there was no difference in the proportion of patients in whom 30% glenoid diameter could be fully restored, but CAM was able to restore at least 35% in more male and female patients (98.8% vs 79.0% and 100% vs 61.1%, respectively, P = .00001). Intra- and inter-rater reliability was excellent ( intraclass correlation coefficient ≥0.950 for all dimensions).

Conclusions: We describe a reliable method of measuring coracoid dimensions for preoperative planning of glenoid restoration. The classic Latarjet technique reliably restores the glenoid anteroposterior diameter with bone loss of up to 30%. The majority of female patients have coracoid thickness <10 mm, which may increase the risk of graft fracture when using CAM. The decision to use the classic Latarjet technique or CAM considers each individual's glenoid and coracoid dimensions with a goal of achieving an on-track shoulder.

Clinical Relevance: Our reliable method of coracoid measurement demonstrated the differing abilities of the classic Latarjet and CAM to restore the native glenoid diameter. An evidence-based algorithm using these measurements was developed to assist in preoperative planning for glenohumeral instability in the setting of bone loss, with a goal of achieving an on-track shoulder. Alternative techniques may be considered if an on-track shoulder cannot be achieved with Latarjet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2021.01.021DOI Listing
June 2021

Technology Used in the Prevention and Treatment of Shoulder and Elbow Injuries in the Overhead Athlete.

Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med 2020 Aug;13(4):472-478

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery Service, Sports Medicine Institute, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021, USA.

Purpose Of Review: To review the current technology available for the prevention and treatment of shoulder and elbow injuries in the overhead athlete.

Recent Findings: Shoulder and elbow injuries are common in recreational and high-level overhead athletes. Injury prevention in these athletes include identifying modifiable risk factors, offering effective preventative training programs, and establishing safe return-to-sport criteria. The advent and use of technologies and wearable devices with concomitant development of software and data analytic programs has significantly changed the role of sports technology in injury identification and prevention. Over the last few decades, leveraging new technologies to better understand and treat patients has become an increasing focus of healthcare. Technologies currently being applied to the treatment of the overhead athlete include kinesiotaping, heart rate monitors, accelerometers/gyroscopes, dynamometers/force plates, camera-based monitoring systems (optical motion analysis), and inertial sensor monitoring units. Advances in technology have made it possible to acquire large amounts of data on athletes that may be used to guide treatment and injury prevention programs; however, literature validating the clinical efficacy of many of these technologies is limited. Further research is needed to continue to allow team physicians to provide better, cost-efficient, and individualized care to the overhead athlete using technology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12178-020-09645-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7340695PMC
August 2020

Anatomy, imaging, treatment options for Baker's Cyst.

Pain Physician 2008 May-Jun;11(3):376-7; author reply 377-8

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August 2008