Publications by authors named "Srianant Wanasen"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and associated risk factors in Nham, a Thai fermented pork product.

Food Microbiol 2009 Aug 5;26(5):547-51. Epub 2009 Mar 5.

Food Biotechnology Laboratory, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), 113 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent bacterial pathogens causing food-borne disease worldwide. Staphylococcal food poisoning is caused by ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) pre-formed in the implicated food. In this study, the incidences of S. aureus and classical SEs (SEA-SEE) contamination in 'Nham', a traditional Thai fermented pork product, were determined. Among 155 Nham samples tested, as high as 39.35% of the samples were positive for S. aureus (2-3500 MPN/g), but none were positive for the SEs. The risk factors for S. aureus contamination were highly correlated with the manufacturer and the pH of the product. A predictive model determined the probability of the presence of S. aureus to be < or = 0.24 at the pH < or = 4.6. During the fermentation process, the number of S. aureus slightly increased in the first day and decreased afterward. S. aureus counts continued to decrease when Nham was stored refrigerated. The negative result for enterotoxins and low counts of S. aureus in Nham surveyed in this study, and reduction of the pathogen counts during fermentation and storage suggested that there is very low risk of staphylococcal food poisoning from consuming properly fermented Nham.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fm.2009.02.009DOI Listing
August 2009

Monitoring Lactobacillus plantarum BCC 9546 starter culture during fermentation of Nham, a traditional Thai pork sausage.

Int J Food Microbiol 2009 Feb 16;129(3):312-5. Epub 2008 Dec 16.

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), 113 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

The use of Lactobacillus plantarum BCC 9546 (LpBCC9546) as a starter culture for Nham, a traditional Thai fermented pork sausage ensures product quality and consistency. However, no direct evidence has confirmed the growth of this starter during Nham fermentation. In order to investigate its role during Nham fermentation, LpBCC9546 was genetically modified to distinguish it from the natural microflora in Nham. LpBCC9546 was transformed with a recombinant plasmid pRV85 to produce the recombinant strain LpG11, which is resistant to erythromycin and emits green fluorescence. LpG11 was used as a starter culture for Nham fermentation, and its growth was monitored by plating on a selective medium and assay of fluorescent activity. During Nham fermentation the numbers of LpG11 increased ten fold during the first 12 h of fermentation, reaching maximum numbers of between 10(7) and 10(8) cfu g(-1) after 24 h, and then declining after 60 h to 10(5) cfu g(-1) at 168 h. The growth of LpG11 starter culture during Nham fermentation was very similar to that of the untransformed LpBCC9546, although after a prolonged period of fermentation the recombinant LpG11 bacteria appeared to lose the plasmid, or were outgrown by naturally present L. plantarum. The acidity, texture and color of fermented Nham inoculated with recombinant LpG11 or untransformed LpBCC9546 were similar. These results indicated that the recombinant L. plantarum strain LpG11 is a suitable starter culture for Nham fermentation, and that the ability to monitor its growth directly during Nham fermentation could be exploited to further improve Nham production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.12.011DOI Listing
February 2009