Publications by authors named "Sonya Reid"

9 Publications

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Impact of molecular subtype and race on HR+, HER2- breast cancer survival.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2021 Jul 31. Epub 2021 Jul 31.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC)/Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), 2220 Pierce Ave. 777 PRB, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA.

Purpose: There is an urgent need to understand the biological factors contributing to the racial survival disparity among women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), HER2- breast cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of PAM50 subtype on 10-year mortality rate in women with HR+, HER2- breast cancer by race.

Methods: Women with localized, HR+, HER2- breast cancer diagnosed between 2002 and 2012 from two population-based cohorts were evaluated. Archival tumors were obtained and classified by PAM50 into four molecular subtypes (i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like). The molecular subtypes within HR+, HER2- breast cancers and corresponding 10-year mortality rate were compared between Black and Non-Hispanic White (NHW) women using Cox proportional hazard ratios and survival analysis, adjusting for covariates.

Results: In this study, 318 women with localized, HR+, HER2- breast cancer were included-227 Black (71%) and 91 NHW (29%). Young Black women (age ≤ 50) had the highest proportion of HR+, non-luminal A tumors (47%), compared to young NHW (10%), older Black women (31%), and older NHW (30%). Overall, women with HR+, non-luminal A subtypes had a higher 10-year mortality rate compared to HR+, luminal A subtypes after adjustment for age, stage, and income (HR 4.21 for Blacks, 95% CI 1.74-10.18 and HR 3.44 for NHW, 95% CI 1.31-9.03). Among HR+, non-luminal A subtypes there was, however, no significant racial difference in 10-yr mortality observed (Black vs. NHW: HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.58-2.58).

Conclusion: Molecular subtype classification highlights racial disparities in PAM50 subtype distribution among women with HR+, HER2- breast cancer. Among women with HR+, HER2- breast cancer, racial survival disparities are ameliorated after adjusting for molecular subtype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-021-06342-0DOI Listing
July 2021

A Pooled Case-only Analysis of Reproductive Risk Factors and Breast Cancer Subtype Among Black Women in the Southeastern United States.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 Jul 4;30(7):1416-1423. Epub 2021 May 4.

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Background: We investigated the association between reproductive risk factors and breast cancer subtype in Black women. On the basis of the previous literature, we hypothesized that the relative prevalence of specific breast cancer subtypes might differ according to reproductive factors.

Methods: We conducted a pooled analysis of 2,188 (591 premenopausal, 1,597 postmenopausal) Black women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer from four studies in the southeastern United States. Breast cancers were classified by clinical subtype. Case-only polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for HER2 and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) status in relation to estrogen receptor-positive (ER)/HER2 status (referent) for reproductive risk factors.

Results: Relative to women who had ER/HER2 tumors, women who were age 19-24 years at first birth (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.22-2.59) were more likely to have TNBC. Parous women were less likely to be diagnosed with HER2 breast cancer and more likely to be diagnosed with TNBC relative to ER/HER2 breast cancer. Postmenopausal parous women who breastfed were less likely to have TNBC [OR, 0.65 (95% CI, 0.43-0.99)].

Conclusions: This large pooled study of Black women with breast cancer revealed etiologic heterogeneity among breast cancer subtypes.

Impact: Black parous women who do not breastfeed are more likely to be diagnosed with TNBC, which has a worse prognosis, than with ER/HER2 breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1784DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8254754PMC
July 2021

Disparities in Genetic Testing and Care among Black women with Hereditary Breast Cancer.

Curr Breast Cancer Rep 2020 Sep 19;12(3):125-131. Epub 2020 May 19.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Purpose Of Review: Despite a steady improvement in breast cancer survival rates over the past several decades, mortality disparities remain among Black women, who have a 42% higher death rate compared to non-Hispanic white (NHW) women. Hereditary breast cancer (HBC) accounts for 5-10% of all breast cancer cases, the majority of which are due to the and () genes. Despite the availability of testing for over 25 years, there remain disproportionately lower rates of genetic testing among Blacks compared to NHW due to a multitude of factors. The intent of this review is to discuss racial disparities focused on HBC across diverse populations and review the existing gaps to be addressed when delivering gene-based care.

Recent Findings: The factors contributing to the racial survival disparity are undoubtedly complex and likely an interplay between tumor biology, genomics, patterns of care and socioeconomic factors. Advances in genomic technologies that now allow for full characterization of germline DNA sequencing are integral in defining the complex and multifactorial cause of breast cancer and may help to explain the existing racial survival disparities.

Summary: Identification of inherited cancer risk may lead to cancer prevention, early cancer detection, treatment guidance, and ultimately has great potential to improve outcomes. Consequently, advances in HBC diagnosis and treatment without widespread implementation have the potential to further widen the existing breast cancer mortality gap between Black and NHW women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12609-020-00364-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7885902PMC
September 2020

A Population-Based Study of Genes Previously Implicated in Breast Cancer.

N Engl J Med 2021 02 20;384(5):440-451. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

From Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (C. Hu, S.N.H., R.G., K.Y.L., J.N., J.L., S. Yadav, N.J.B., T.L., J.E.O., C.S., C.M.V., E.C.P., F.J.C.); Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health (H.H., C.G., D.J.H., P.K.), Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University (K.A.B., J.R.P., L.R.), and Brigham and Women's Hospital (H.E.) - all in Boston; Qiagen, Hilden, Germany (R.S., J.K.); Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo (C.B.A., S. Yao), and Weill Cornell Medicine, New York (R.T.) - both in New York; the University of California, Irvine (H.A.-C., A.Z.), Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte (L.B., H.M., S.N., J.N.W.), Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (C. Haiman), and Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (E.M.J., A.W.K.) - all in California; the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, Milwaukee (P.A.), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison (E.S.B., I.M.O., A.T.-D.); the Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick (E.V.B.); the Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta (B.D.C., S.M.G., M.G., J.M.H., E.J.J., A.V.P.); the University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (D.J.H.); the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (C.K., P.A.N.) and the Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington (S.L.) - both in Seattle; the Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu (L.L.M.); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC (K.M.O., D.P.S., J.A.T., C.W.); Vanderbilt University, Nashville (T.P., S.R.); the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (D.E.G.); and the Department of Medicine and the Basser Center for BRCA, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (S.M.D., K.L.N.).

Background: Population-based estimates of the risk of breast cancer associated with germline pathogenic variants in cancer-predisposition genes are critically needed for risk assessment and management in women with inherited pathogenic variants.

Methods: In a population-based case-control study, we performed sequencing using a custom multigene amplicon-based panel to identify germline pathogenic variants in 28 cancer-predisposition genes among 32,247 women with breast cancer (case patients) and 32,544 unaffected women (controls) from population-based studies in the Cancer Risk Estimates Related to Susceptibility (CARRIERS) consortium. Associations between pathogenic variants in each gene and the risk of breast cancer were assessed.

Results: Pathogenic variants in 12 established breast cancer-predisposition genes were detected in 5.03% of case patients and in 1.63% of controls. Pathogenic variants in and were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, with odds ratios of 7.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.33 to 11.27) and 5.23 (95% CI, 4.09 to 6.77), respectively. Pathogenic variants in were associated with a moderate risk (odds ratio, 3.83; 95% CI, 2.68 to 5.63). Pathogenic variants in , , and were associated with increased risks of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer and triple-negative breast cancer, whereas pathogenic variants in , , and were associated with an increased risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Pathogenic variants in 16 candidate breast cancer-predisposition genes, including the c.657_661del5 founder pathogenic variant in , were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

Conclusions: This study provides estimates of the prevalence and risk of breast cancer associated with pathogenic variants in known breast cancer-predisposition genes in the U.S. population. These estimates can inform cancer testing and screening and improve clinical management strategies for women in the general population with inherited pathogenic variants in these genes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2005936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8127622PMC
February 2021

Strategies to enhance identification of hereditary breast cancer gene carriers.

Expert Rev Mol Diagn 2020 09 11;20(9):861-865. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center , Nashville, TN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14737159.2020.1816829DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7606636PMC
September 2020

Update on multi-gene panel testing and communication of genetic test results.

Authors:
Sonya Reid Tuya Pal

Breast J 2020 08 8;26(8):1513-1519. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

With technological advances, multi-gene panel testing has become increasingly used to identify patients at risk for hereditary breast cancer (HBC). There are currently evidence-based interventions and breast cancer screening strategies that exist for cancer prevention and early detection among patients with HBC. Moreover, in addition to the personal impact of identifying HBC, this information may be shared with at-risk family members to amplify the benefits of testing and subsequent care among those at high risk. Opportunities and challenges with the utilization of updated multi-gene panel testing for HBC, including: (a) tumor sequencing with germline consequences; (b) genetic counseling implications; and (c) strategies to improve the communication of genetic test results to family members will be reviewed. With the advances and expansion of genetic testing, all health care providers need to be updated on both the importance and complexities of HBC counseling and testing, in order to optimize patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13971DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7484453PMC
August 2020

Breast Cancer in Jamaica: Trends From 2010 to 2014-Is Mortality Increasing?

JCO Glob Oncol 2020 06;6:837-843

The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica.

Purpose: This study sought to provide a detailed analysis of breast cancer-specific mortality in Jamaica on the basis of reported deaths between 2010 and 2014.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was done to analyze breast cancer-specific mortality data from the Registrar General's Department, the statutory body responsible for registering all deaths across Jamaica.

Results: A total of 1,634 breast cancer-related deaths were documented among Jamaican women between 2010 and 2014, which accounted for 24% of all female cancer deaths. The age-standardized breast cancer mortality rate increased from 21.8 per 100,000 in 2010 to 28 per 100,000 in 2014 for the total female population. The overall difference in breast cancer mortality rates between the 2014 and 2010 rates was not statistically significant ( = .114). Analysis of the year-by-year trend reflected by the annual percentage of change did show, however, a statistically significant increasing trend in breast cancer mortality ( = .028). Mortality rates varied by age, with statistically significant annual increases observed in the 35-44-, 65-74-, and ≥ 75-year age groups ( = .04, .03, and .01, respectively).

Conclusion: Breast cancer remains the leading cause of death among Jamaican women. Despite global advances in breast cancer screening and management, breast cancer remains a major public health challenge and represents a public health priority in Jamaica. The increasing breast cancer-specific mortality in Jamaica over the 5-year period contrasts with decreasing mortality rates among US women with breast cancer. This study highlights the critical need to address the implementation of a national organized breast cancer screening program in Jamaica and to focus future research efforts on the biology of breast cancer, especially among young Jamaican women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/GO.20.00022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7328114PMC
June 2020

Disparities in BRCA counseling across providers in a diverse population of young breast cancer survivors.

Genet Med 2020 06 18;22(6):1088-1093. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.

Purpose: All women diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) ≤age 50 should be referred for genetic counseling (GC) and testing. We sought to compare differences in provider practices and access across a racially and ethnically diverse population of young BC survivors.

Methods: A registry-based sample of women diagnosed with invasive BC ≤age 50 from 2009 to 2012 was recruited through the Florida Cancer Registry, and completed a questionnaire and medical record release. Differences were compared across those tested with or without the involvement of a board-certified or credentialed genetics health professional (GHP) in (1) clinical and demographic variables and (2) pretest GC elements.

Results: Of 1622 participants, there were 440 Blacks, 285 Hispanics, and 897 Non-Hispanic Whites. Of 831 participants with medical record verification of testing provider, 170 (20%) had documentation of GHP involvement. Among the 613 who recalled a pretest discussion and had GC elements collected, those with GHP involvement were significantly more likely to recall the seven recognized GC elements.

Conclusion: GHP involvement was associated with adherence to nationally recommended best practices. With the expanding importance of identifying inherited cancers, it is critical to ensure equitable access to best practices across all populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-0762-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7275890PMC
June 2020

Sex Disparity Observed for Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score in Predicting Mortality Among Patients with Early Stage ER-Positive Breast Cancer.

Clin Cancer Res 2020 01 20;26(1):101-109. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Purpose: Prognostic value of Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score (RS) in male patients with breast cancer is understudied. We evaluated associations of RS with overall mortality in male patients with breast cancer and compared it with female counterparts.

Experimental Design: With a cohort of 848 male and 110,898 female patients with breast cancer identified from the National Cancer Database (2010-2014), we estimated HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for overall mortality associated with RS using Cox regression models. RS was evaluated continuously, as well as by categorization following respective traditional (≤17, 18-30, and ≥31) and TAILORx (≤10, 11-25, and ≥26) cutoffs.

Results: RS was positively associated with mortality in male patients (HR = 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26 per unit RS increment) up to RS > 21, after which the risk plateaued. Among female patients, mortality began to increase with RS only when RS > 23 (HR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02 per unit of RS increment). The intermediate- (HR = 5.37; 95% CI, 1.79-16.11) and high-risk diseases (HR = 4.28; 95% CI, 1.22-14.97) defined by TAILORx, but not traditional cutoffs established for female patients, were associated with elevated mortality risk in men even after adjustment for demographic, clinical characteristics, and treatments, except chemotherapy.

Conclusions: RS is associated with mortality in male patients with breast cancer at a much lower threshold than that for female patients. Studies are needed to establish specific guidelines for RS thresholds for male patients with breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-19-2424DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7380510PMC
January 2020
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