Publications by authors named "Soliane Carra Perera"

5 Publications

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Multiresistant bacteria isolated from domestic and wild animals with skin lesions were susceptible to native plants from Southern Brazil.

Nat Prod Res 2021 Jun 2:1-5. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Department of Veterinary Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

We evaluated the chemical composition, toxicity, and antibacterial activity of (SCH), (EUG), (PER), (EQU), (SOL), and (BRA). These plants were tested (7.5-0.01 mg/mL) against Gram-positive (G+;  = 32) and Gram-negative (G-;  = 26) isolates from animals (M07-A9, CLSI). Antibiogram (disk diffusion), chromatographic analysis (UPLC), and toxicity assay (HET-CAM) were also performed. A high incidence of resistance was noted, in which 18.4% (07/38) of G+ () and 17.7% (06/34) of G- () were multidrug-resistant. All bacteria were sensitive (MIC) to SCH (both 3.75 mg/mL), EUG (3.75 mg/mL and 7.5 mg/mL, respectively) and PER (both 7.5 mg/mL). SCH/EUG/PER highlighted as antibacterial, probably due to the major compounds (ethyl gallate, quinic acid, quercetin). These extracts showed normal embryonic development (SCH/EUG: 7.5-0.94 mg/mL). These findings highlighted the promising use of native plants for therapeutic purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2021.1933972DOI Listing
June 2021

Dioctophimosis: A Parasitic Zoonosis of Public Health Importance.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2021 ;1306:129-142

Project Dioctophyme renale in Dogs and Cats (PRODIC), Department of Veterinary Clinics, Veterinary College, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

Dioctophyme renale, the giant kidney worm, is a renal nematode from domestic and wild mammals that has zoonotic potential. In humans, dioctophimosis has been reported in several countries, mainly on the Asian continent, totaling more than 40 cases, which describe the parasite mainly infecting the kidneys, bladder, urethra and skin. Infection in animals and humans is related to the ingestion of the infective larva (L3) present in the aquatic oligochaete annelid (mandatory intermediate host) or fish and anurans (facultative paratenic hosts). Thus, the infection is related to the habit of drinking water contaminated with the mandatory intermediate host, as well as raw or undercooked meat from the facultative paratenic hosts. Dioctophimosis destroys the renal parenchyma and, in some cases, can cause the death of its hosts. In this chapter, we discuss the main topics regarding dioctophimosis in humans, domestic and wild animals, highlighting its importance in public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63908-2_10DOI Listing
May 2021

Ectopic Dioctophyme renale in the thoracic and abdominal cavities associated with renal parasitism in a dog.

Parasitol Int 2021 Feb 24;80:102211. Epub 2020 Oct 24.

Departamento de Clínicas Veterinárias, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, Capão do Leão, RS 96160-000, Brazil.

Dioctophymosis is the disease caused by the nematode Dioctophyme renale, normally found parasitizing the right kidney of dogs. The absence of symptoms is frequent in parasitized animals. The surgical procedures are commonly performed to treat this disease. This work describes a case involving a canine with renal and ectopic parasitosis in the abdominal and thoracic regions. A mixed-breed female dog, approximately four months old, was diagnosed by ultrasound as for the presence of D. renale in the right kidney and abdominal and thoracic cavities. The animal underwent exploratory celiotomy, nephrectomy of the parasitized kidney, and transdiaphragmatic thoracotomy to remove the thoracic parasite, with a single abdominal surgical wound and excellent postoperative recovery. Several reports of ectopic parasitosis are found, however, the thoracic finding is unusual, and curative therapeutic transdiaphragmatic thoracotomy for dioctophymosis in dogs has not been previously described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2020.102211DOI Listing
February 2021

Dioctophyme renale (Nematoda: Enoplida) in domestic dogs and cats in the extreme south of Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2017 Jan-Mar;26(1):119-121. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Clínica Cirúrgica Veterinária, Departamento de Clínicas Veterinária, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Dioctophyme renale is a zoonotic nematode that parasites the kidneys of wild and domestic carnivores, and it has been reported frequently in Brazil. The aim here was to register the number of cases of dogs and cats diagnosed with dioctophymosis by necropsy (1981 to 2014) and ultrasound examination (2010 to 2015) in Pelotas-RS. In this context, a survey was conducted on dioctophymosis cases diagnosed at the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory (LPV) and Veterinary Clinical Hospital (HCV) of the Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), and at a specialist veterinary imaging diagnostics clinic. In total, 95 cases were registered. The high series of the disease in dogs can be related to the presence of a large number of stray and semi-domestic dogs in the city, and also due to the ingestion of intermediate hosts of D. renale parasitized with the infective larvae. Thus, it can be concluded that Pelotas is a city with favorable conditions for the occurrence of dioctophymosis with high rate of disease in recent years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612016072DOI Listing
May 2018

First isolation of Dioctophyme renale eggs from an urban environment and identification of those from animal urine.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2017 Jan-Mar;26(1):89-91. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Dioctophyme renale is a zoonotic parasite with worldwide distribution, although its occurrence is little known. The objective here was to evaluate the presence of parasite eggs in the environment and in the urine of dogs and cats in an urban area. Soil samples and urine were evaluated respectively by means of the Caldwell-Caldwell technique and urinalysis. Out of the 100 soil samples, 3% presented D. renale eggs, and out of the 43 urine samples, 18.6% were positive, including the feline samples. Thus, D. renale eggs are present in the urban environment, and dogs and cats are parasitized by this nematode, which therefore represents a risk to public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612016064DOI Listing
May 2018