Publications by authors named "Solène Frismand"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Trans-Spinal Direct Current Stimulation for Managing Primary Orthostatic Tremor.

Mov Disord 2021 Mar 27. Epub 2021 Mar 27.

Institut du Cerveau / Paris Brain Institute, ICM, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, CNRS UMR 7225, Inserm U 1127, Sorbonne Université UM75, Paris, France.

Background: Primary orthostatic tremor (POT) is a rare disorder, characterized by 13 to 18 Hz tremor in the legs when standing and is often refractory to medical treatment. Epidural spinal cord stimulation has been proposed as an alternative treatment. However, this approach is invasive, which limits its application.

Objective: Trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a non-invasive method to modulate spinal cord circuits. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was to investigate the potential beneficial effect of tsDCS in POT.

Methods: We conducted a double-blind, sham-controlled study in 16 patients with POT. In two separate visits, patients received sham tsDCS first followed by active (either cathodal or anodal) tsDCS. The primary outcome was the change in time in standing position. Secondary outcomes comprised quantitative assessment of tremor, measurement of corticospinal excitability including short-latency afferent inhibition, and clinical global impression-improvement (CGI-I). Measurements were made at baseline, after sham tsDCS, 0-30 min, and 30-60 min after active conditions.

Results: Cathodal-tsDCS reduced tremor amplitude and frequency and lowered corticospinal excitability whereas anodal-tsDCS reduced tremor frequency only. CGI-I scores positively correlated with the time in standing position after both active tsDCS conditions.

Conclusion: A single session of tsDCS can improve instability in POT. This opens a new vista for experimental treatment options using multiple sessions of spinal DC stimulation. © 2021 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.28581DOI Listing
March 2021

Recurrent seizures of autoimmune origin: emerging phenotypes.

J Neurol 2021 Feb 27. Epub 2021 Feb 27.

Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Nancy, Nancy, France.

Objective: Recurrent seizures of autoimmune origin (AEp) are one of the most frequent causes of recurrent seizures or suspected epilepsy of unknown cause. The aim of this study was to identify specific phenotypes corresponding to AEp.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed features of patients with recurrent seizures of unknown cause and investigated for suspected AEp (January 2015-May 2018). Patients were separated in: (1) AEpAb+: AEp with positive autoantibodies; (2) AEpAb-: suspected AEp (inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) profile) without autoantibodies; (3) NAEp: epilepsy without CNS inflammation.

Results: Eighty-nine epileptic patients underwent a CSF antibody detection. From the remaining 57 epileptic patients (32 excluded for a differential diagnosis), 61.4% were considered as AEp. 21% were AEpAb+ (4 NMDAR, 2 GABAbR, 3 GAD-Ab, 2 LGi1, 1 CASPR2), 40.4% AEpAb-, and 38.6% NAE. AE (AEpAb+ and AEpAb-) was significantly associated with antibody prevalence in epilepsy (APE) score ≥ 4 (80%), encephalitic phase (71.4%), psychiatric involvement (64.7%), cognitive impairment (50%), and status epilepticus (41.2%). Within the group of 29 patients without encephalitic phase and with chronic epilepsy (NEPp), 34.5% were defined as AEp. 10.4% were AEpAb+ (2 GAD, 1 CASPR2) and 24.1% were AEpAb-. NEP AEp was associated with non-cerebral autoimmune disorders, short epileptic disease duration, and cognitive impairment.

Conclusions: Autoimmune cause (AEp) should be assessed in patient suffering from recurrent seizures of unknown cause. Acute encephalitis is clearly the main AEp phenotype. AEp was also defined in more than one-third of chronic epilepsy patients (NEP) of unknown cause. Then, AEp may be combined with other autoimmune comorbidities, a shorter evolution of recurrent seizures, and cognitive impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-021-10457-1DOI Listing
February 2021

Benefit of long-acting paliperidone in Huntington's disease: a case report.

Int Clin Psychopharmacol 2021 Mar;36(2):101-103

Pharmacopsy Alsace, Etablissement Public de Santé Alsace Nord, Brumath Laboratoire De Toxicologie Et Pharmacologie Neuro Cardiovasculaire, Université De Strasbourg, Strasbourg Département de Neurologie Centre Expert Parkinson, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy, 54000, Nancy Pôle Universitaire de Psychiatrie du Grand Nancy Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy CPN, Laxou, France.

Through this brief report, we described our clinical considerations about the treatment of motor fluctuations and psychiatric comorbidities in Huntington's disease, for example, aggressiveness and obsessive-compulsive disorders. Indeed, as classical treatment, for example, olanzapine and risperidone, were inefficient to improve motor disorders in our patient, we postulated that motor fluctuations could be influenced by the pharmacokinetic profile of oral risperidone. So, in line with recent practice in schizophrenia, we proposed empirically paliperidone 1-month long-acting injections hypothesized to improve motor fluctuations, treatment so far reserved to Huntington's disease patients who are noncompliant to oral risperidone. Improvement was soon observed concerning motor fluctuations, but also aggressiveness, supporting our initial hypothesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/YIC.0000000000000346DOI Listing
March 2021

Expanding the clinical spectrum of STIP1 homology and U-box containing protein 1-associated ataxia.

J Neurol 2021 Jan 8. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Service de Génétique Médicale, Hôpitaux de Brabois, CHRU de Nancy, Rue du Morvan, 54500, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France.

Background: STUB1 has been first associated with autosomal recessive (SCAR16, MIM# 615768) and later with dominant forms of ataxia (SCA48, MIM# 618093). Pathogenic variations in STUB1 are now considered a frequent cause of cerebellar ataxia.

Objective: We aimed to improve the clinical, radiological, and molecular delineation of SCAR16 and SCA48.

Methods: Retrospective collection of patients with SCAR16 or SCA48 diagnosed in three French genetic centers (Montpellier, Strasbourg and Nancy).

Results: Here, we report four SCAR16 and nine SCA48 patients from two SCAR16 and five SCA48 unrelated French families. All presented with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. Additional findings included cognitive decline, dystonia, parkinsonism and swallowing difficulties. The age at onset was highly variable, ranging from 14 to 76 years. Brain MRI showed marked cerebellar atrophy in all patients. Phenotypic findings associated with STUB1 pathogenic variations cover a broad spectrum, ranging from isolated slowly progressive ataxia to severe encephalopathy, and include extrapyramidal features. We described five new pathogenic variations, two previously reported pathogenic variations, and two rare variants of unknown significance in association with STUB1-related disorders. We also report the first pathogenic variation associated with both dominant and recessive forms of inheritance (SCAR16 and SCA48).

Conclusion: Even though differences are observed between the recessive and dominant forms, it appears that a continuum exists between these two entities. While adding new symptoms associated with STUB1 pathogenic variations, we insist on the difficulty of genetic counselling in STUB1-related pathologies. Finally, we underscore the usefulness of DAT-scan as an additional clue for diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-10348-xDOI Listing
January 2021

Parkinson's Disease and Bilateral Subthalamic Nuclei Deep Brain Stimulation: Beneficial Effects of Preoperative Cognitive Restructuration Therapy on Postoperative Social Adjustment.

World Neurosurg 2021 Jan 30;145:282-289. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Faculté de médecine, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France; Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy, Laxou, France.

Background: Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves motor symptoms and treatment-related complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, some patients have trouble adjusting socially after successful neurosurgery, in part because of "unrealistic" expectations and psychiatric disorders. Preoperative psychological interventions focusing on these aspects could be beneficial for such patients.

Methods: We compared the outcomes of 2 psychosocial approaches-1 based on cognitive restructuration and 1 consisting of 2 interviews-with those of a control group without preoperative preparation. All patients underwent a psychometric evaluation 2 months before surgery (M-2) and again at 3 (M+3) and 6 months (M+6) after surgery. The psychometric evaluation focused on social adjustment using the social adjustment scale-self-report. The psychiatric profile of the patients was also assessed.

Results: Of 73 patients initially enrolled, 62 performed the initial inclusion visit (M-2) and the 2 postoperative visits (M+3, M+6). For these 62 patients (52% male), the overall mean age was 59 ± 6.13 years, and the mean disease duration was 9.44 ± 3.62 years. No specific differences were observed for social adjustment between the groups or visits (M-2, M+3, M+6); however, an interaction was found in the cognitive restructuration group at M+6 for the family dimension of the social adjustment scale-self-report.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that even if no overall increase in the social adjustment score was observed, patients with Parkinson's disease eligible for neurosurgery should undergo preoperative psychosocial therapy to define their expectations and help them in their psychological restructuration. This type of therapy, complementary to psychoeducation, could represent an opportunity to prevent postoperative deception and social maladjustment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.09.128DOI Listing
January 2021

GAD65-Ab encephalitis and subtle focal status epilepticus.

Epileptic Disord 2019 Oct;21(5):437-442

Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Nancy, University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, CRAN CNRS UMR 7039, Nancy, France.

Aims: To delineate common epilepsy features associated with the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GAD65-Ab).

Methods: Three consecutive cases of GAD65-Ab encephalitis patients, followed in our neurological department, were investigated with regards to clinical semiology and EEG.

Results: These patients presented new-onset subtle ictal clinical features. Patients 1 and 2 described prolonged and transitory feelings of "déjà vu - déjà vécu" and a "dreamy state". Patient 3 was admitted for subsequent transient aphasia events followed by paroxysmal behavioural disturbances. Epileptic origin of the symptoms was confirmed using either a standard EEG (observation of temporal status epilepticus in one case) or a prolonged EEG (focal epileptiform activity during an asymptomatic period for two patients). All patients suffered from clinical focal status epilepticus. Patients 1 and 2 presented with temporo-mesial seizures in agreement with the definition for limbic encephalitis, whereas Patient 3 presented with neocortical (lateral temporal and frontal lobe) seizures arguing for a non-limbic encephalitis. A high level of GAD65-Ab was found in cerebral spinal fluid, confirming a diagnosis of epilepsy associated with GAD65-Ab encephalitis.

Conclusion: Encephalitis seems to be a frequent neurological syndrome associated with GAD65-Ab disorders. Epilepsy may be more frequent and severe than currently suggested, as ictal semiology may be subtle for these outpatients in whom standard EEG is commonly falsely reassuring. Subtle focal status epilepticus is a particular semiology of the GAD65-Ab encephalitis spectrum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/epd.2019.1094DOI Listing
October 2019

123I-FP-CIT-SPECT in Encephalitis Involving Substantia Nigra.

Clin Nucl Med 2016 Oct;41(10):e445-6

From the Departments of *Nuclear Medicine, and †Neurology, CHU-Nancy, F-54000, Nancy, France.

I-FP-CIT-SPECT is currently used to detect functional impairment of striatal structures. We report herein a case where I-FP-CIT abnormalities are seemingly related to an encephalitis involving substantia nigra. A few months after a documented encephalitis, a 19-year-old woman experienced a Parkinsonism with a right dominance. There was a reduction in the striatal binding of I-FP-CIT, especially on the left side, in accordance with the right dominance of the Parkinsonism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLU.0000000000001323DOI Listing
October 2016

Beyond the core face-processing network: Intracerebral stimulation of a face-selective area in the right anterior fusiform gyrus elicits transient prosopagnosia.

Cortex 2015 Nov 4;72:140-155. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

Service de Neurologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy, Nancy, France; UMR 7039, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France.

According to neuropsychological evidence, a distributed network of regions of the ventral visual pathway - from the lateral occipital cortex to the temporal pole - supports face recognition. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have generally confined ventral face-selective areas to the posterior section of the occipito-temporal cortex, i.e., the inferior occipital gyrus occipital face area (OFA) and the posterior and middle fusiform gyrus fusiform face area (FFA). There is recent evidence that intracranial electrical stimulation of these areas in the right hemisphere elicits face matching and recognition impairments (i.e., prosopagnosia) as well as perceptual face distortions. Here we report a case of transient inability to recognize faces following electrical stimulation of the right anterior fusiform gyrus, in a region located anteriorly to the FFA. There was no perceptual face distortion reported during stimulation. Although no fMRI face-selective responses were found in this region due to a severe signal drop-out as in previous studies, intracerebral face-selective event-related potentials and gamma range electrophysiological responses were found at the critical site of stimulation. These results point to a causal role in face recognition of the right anterior fusiform gyrus and more generally of face-selective areas located beyond the "core" face-processing network in the right ventral temporal cortex. It also illustrates the diagnostic value of intracerebral electrophysiological recordings and stimulation in understanding the neural basis of face recognition and visual recognition in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2015.05.026DOI Listing
November 2015

Self-face hallucination evoked by electrical stimulation of the human brain.

Neurology 2014 Jul 18;83(4):336-8. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

From Service de Neurologie (J.J., L.M., S.F., H.V., J.-P.V.) and Service de Neurochirurgie (S.C.-C.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy; CRAN, UMR 7039 (J.J., L.M., H.V., J.-P.V.), Université de Lorraine and CNRS, Nancy; Faculté de Médecine de Nancy (J.J., L.M., S.C.-C., H.V.), Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France; and Université Catholique de Louvain (J.J., B.R.), Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgique.

Objectives: Self-face hallucination (autoscopic hallucination or AH) has been reported in patients with widespread brain damage or retrospectively after epileptic seizures. The neural basis and the self-processing operations underlying AH remain unknown.

Methods: We report the results of intracerebral electrical stimulations of the right medial occipitoparietal cortex (right precuneus and occipitoparietal sulcus) in 2 patients with epilepsy who underwent a stereo-EEG.

Results: Immediately after the onset of the stimulation, the 2 patients reported seeing their current own face, facing themselves, in their left visual field.

Conclusions: Our study shows that the medial occipitoparietal junction has a key role in generating AH. This region has been shown to have a central role in various self-processing operations and especially in self-face recognition. Our observations further reveal that this region is involved in a visual representation of our own face, which is generated during the pathologic phenomenon of AH. This visual representation of our own face may be useful for self-face recognition and social cognition processes involving judgment of self-facial resemblance to others.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000000628DOI Listing
July 2014

Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

Hum Brain Mapp 2014 Jul 25;35(7):3360-71. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Service de Neurologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy, Nancy, France; Université de Lorraine, CRAN, UMR 7039, Nancy, France; Faculté de Médecine de Nancy, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France; Université Catholique de Louvain, IPSY, IoNS, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgique; CNRS, CRAN, UMR 7039, Nancy, France.

Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22407DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6869193PMC
July 2014

MRI findings in AOA2: Cerebellar atrophy and abnormal iron detection in dentate nucleus.

Neuroimage Clin 2013 10;2:542-8. Epub 2013 Apr 10.

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Neuro-ophtalmology Unit and Neurology D, Neurological and Neurosurgical Hospital P. Wertheimer, Lyon F-69000, France.

Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is one of the most frequent types of autosomal degenerative cerebellar ataxia. The first objective of this work was to identify specific cerebellar atrophy using MRI in patients with AOA2. Since increased iron deposits have been reported in degenerative diseases, our second objective was to report iron deposits signals in the dentate nuclei in AOA2. Five patients with AOA2 and 5 age-matched controls were subjects in a 3T MRI experiment that included a 3D turbo field echo T1-weighted sequence. The normalized volumes of twenty-eight cerebellar lobules and the percentage of atrophy (relative to controls) of the 4 main cerebellar regions (flocculo-nodular, vermis, anterior and posterior) were measured. The dentate nucleus signals using 3D fast field echo sequence for susceptibility-weighted images (SWI) were reported, as a measure of iron content. We found that all patients had a significant atrophy of all cerebellar lobules as compared to controls. The percentage of atrophy was the highest for the vermis, consistent with patients' oculomotor presentation, and for the anterior lobe, consistent with kinetic limb ataxia. We also describe an absence of hypointensity of the iron signal on SWI in the dentate nucleus of all patients compared to control subjects. This study suggests that patients with Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 present MRI patterns consistent with their clinical presentation. The absence of SWI hypointensity in dentate nucleus is a new radiological sign which was identified in all patients. The specificity of this absence of signal must be further determined in AOA2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2013.03.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3777765PMC
November 2013

Saccades and eye-head coordination in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2.

Cerebellum 2013 Aug;12(4):557-67

INSERM U1028; CNRS UMR5292; Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, ImpAct Team, Bron, 69676, France.

Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias. Oculomotor apraxia refers to horizontal gaze failure due to deficits in voluntary/reactive eye movements. These deficits can manifest as increased latency and/or hypometria of saccades with a staircase pattern and are frequently associated with compensatory head thrust movements. Oculomotor disturbances associated with AOA2 have been poorly studied mainly because the diagnosis of oculomotor apraxia was based on the presence of compensatory head thrusts. The aim of this study was to characterise the nature of horizontal gaze failure in patients with AOA2 and to demonstrate oculomotor apraxia even in the absence of head thrusts. Five patients with AOA2, without head thrusts, were tested in saccadic tasks with the head restrained or free to move and their performance was compared to a group of six healthy participants. The most salient deficit of the patients was saccadic hypometria with a typical staircase pattern. Saccade latency in the patients was longer than controls only for memory-guided saccades. In the head-free condition, head movements were delayed relative to the eye and their amplitude and velocity were strongly reduced compared to controls. Our study emphasises that in AOA2, hypometric saccades with a staircase pattern are a more reliable sign of oculomotor apraxia than head thrust movements. In addition, the variety of eye and head movements' deficits suggests that, although the main neural degeneration in AOA2 affects the cerebellum, this disease affects other structures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12311-013-0463-1DOI Listing
August 2013

Direct evidence of nonadherence to antiepileptic medication in refractory focal epilepsy.

Epilepsia 2013 Jan 13;54(1):e20-3. Epub 2012 Nov 13.

Neurology Department, University Hospital of Nancy, France.

The adherence to medication in drug-resistant focal epilepsy (RFE) remains largely unknown. The present work aimed to assess the frequency of recent adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with RFE. This prospective observational study screened all patients with RFE, admitted to the Nancy University Hospital between April 2006 and September 2008, for a 5-day hospitalization without AED tapering. The adherence to AEDs was assessed by measuring serum drug levels on day 1 (reflecting the recent "at home" adherence) and day 5 (reflecting the individual reference concentration when drug ingestion was supervised). A patient was considered nonadherent if at least one of their serum drug levels was different between days 1 and 5. The day-1 value was considered different from day 5 when it was at least 30% lower (underdosed) or 30% higher (overdosed). Nonadherent patients were classified as under-consumers in the case of one or more underdosed day-1 values, over-consumers in the case of one or more overdosed day-1 values, or undefined if they exhibited both underdosed and overdosed day-1 values. Forty-four of the 48 screened patients were included. Eighteen (40.9%) of 44 patients were nonadherent. Among them, 12 (66.7%) were over-consumers, 4 (22.2%) were under-consumers, and 2 (11.1%) were undefined nonadherents. The study indicates that recent adherence to antiepileptic medication in this group of patients with RFE is poor. Overconsumption is the most frequent form of nonadherence in this population and should be specifically assessed to prevent its possible consequences in terms of AEDs dose-dependent adverse events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03695.xDOI Listing
January 2013