Publications by authors named "Sohee Ryu"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Daily Life Changes and Life Satisfaction among Korean School-Aged Children in the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 03 23;18(6). Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Department of Child Development and Family Studies, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has been disrupting the daily lives of people across the world, causing a major concern for psychological well-being in children. This study aimed to examine (1) how life satisfaction and its potential predictors have been affected by the pandemic among school-aged children in Korea, and (2) which factors would predict their life satisfaction during the pandemic. We surveyed 166 fourth-graders in the Seoul metropolitan area to assess their psychological well-being and potentially related variables during the pandemic. The data were compared with those available from two pre-COVID-19 surveys, the 2018 Korean Children and Youth Panel Survey ( = 1236) and the 2019 Korean Children and Youth Well-being Index Survey ( = 334). Higher levels of stress were observed in children during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the level of their life satisfaction remained unchanged when compared with data from the pre-COVID-19 surveys. The pandemic also affected peer relationship quality and susceptibility to smartphone addiction, but not perceived parenting style nor academic engagement. Interestingly, peer relationship quality no longer predicted life satisfaction during the pandemic; perceived parenting styles and parent-child conversation time predicted life satisfaction. The results suggest a central role of parent-child relationship in supporting the psychological well-being of school-aged children during the pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063324DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8004811PMC
March 2021

Prognostic value of integrated cytogenetic, somatic variation, and copy number variation analyses in Korean patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

PLoS One 2021 5;16(2):e0246322. Epub 2021 Feb 5.

Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: To investigate the prognostic value of gene variants and copy number variations (CNVs) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM), an integrative genomic analysis was performed.

Methods: Sixty-seven patients with NDMM exhibiting more than 60% plasma cells in the bone marrow aspirate were enrolled in the study. Whole-exome sequencing was conducted on bone marrow nucleated cells. Mutation and CNV analyses were performed using the CNVkit and Nexus Copy Number software. In addition, karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization were utilized for the integrated analysis.

Results: Eighty-three driver gene mutations were detected in 63 patients with NDMM. The median number of mutations per patient was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0-3.0, range = 0-8). MAML2 and BHLHE41 mutations were associated with decreased survival. CNVs were detected in 56 patients (72.7%; 56/67). The median number of CNVs per patient was 6.0 (95% CI = 5.7-7.0; range = 0-16). Among the CNVs, 1q gain, 6p gain, 6q loss, 8p loss, and 13q loss were associated with decreased survival. Additionally, 1q gain and 6p gain were independent adverse prognostic factors. Increased numbers of CNVs and driver gene mutations were associated with poor clinical outcomes. Cluster analysis revealed that patients with the highest number of driver mutations along with 1q gain, 6p gain, and 13q loss exhibited the poorest prognosis.

Conclusions: In addition to the known prognostic factors, the integrated analysis of genetic variations and CNVs could contribute to prognostic stratification of patients with NDMM.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246322PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7864461PMC
July 2021

Ultradeep Sequencing Analysis of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria Clones Detected by Flow Cytometry: PIG Mutation in Small PNH Clones.

Am J Clin Pathol 2021 06;156(1):72-85

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Objectives: We aimed to determine whether small paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) clones detected by flow cytometry (FCM) harbor PIG gene mutations with quantitative correlation.

Methods: We analyzed 89 specimens from 63 patients whose PNH clone size was ≥0.1% by FCM. We performed ultradeep sequencing for the PIGA, PIGM, PIGT, and PIGX genes in these specimens.

Results: A strong positive correlation between PNH clone size by FCM and variant allele frequency (VAF) of PIG gene mutation was identified (RBCs: r = 0.77, P < .001; granulocytes: r = 0.68, P < .001). Granulocyte clone size of 2.5% or greater and RBCs 0.4% or greater by FCM always harbored PIG gene mutations. Meanwhile, in patients with clone sizes of less than 2.5% in granulocytes or less than 0.4% in RBCs, PIG gene mutations were present in only 15.9% and 12.2% of cases, respectively. In addition, there was not a statistically significant positive correlation between FCM clone size and VAF or the presence or absence of a PIG mutation.

Conclusions: Our results showed that in small PNH clones PIG gene mutations were present in only a small portion without significant correlation to VAF or the presence or absence of a PIG mutation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/aqaa211DOI Listing
June 2021

The First Case of Congenital Prekallikrein Deficiency in Korea With a Novel Pathogenic Variant (c.1198G>T).

Ann Lab Med 2019 Mar;39(2):229-231

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3343/alm.2019.39.2.229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240513PMC
March 2019

Shifting of erythroleukemia to myelodysplastic syndrome according to the revised WHO classification: Biologic and cytogenetic features of shifted erythroleukemia.

Leuk Res 2018 07 30;70:13-19. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues was published. According to 2016 WHO criteria, diagnostic criteria of acute erythroid leukemia was revised. We reassessed 34 de novo acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) diagnosed by 2008 WHO criteria, according to 2016 WHO criteria. A total of 623 patients (excluding M3) with acute myeloid leukemia including 34 patients with AEL were enrolled. Among 34 patients diagnosed with AEL, diagnosis was shifted to MDS-EB in 28 patients (28/34, 82.3%) and MDS-U in 2 patients (2/34, 5.9%), while remained as AEL in 4 patients (4/34, 11.8%) according to 2016 WHO criteria. Interphase FISH for cytogenetic changes of MDS (-5/del(5q), -7/del(7q), del(20q), +8) revealed cytogenetic aberrations in 50.0% (17/34) of AEL 2008 group. AEL 2008 group showed higher frequency of complex cytogenetic abnormalities and higher MDS related cytogenetic abnormalities than AML excluding AEL group. Transformation to another AML subtype was noted in 10% in AEL shifted to MDS. Majority (88.2%) of AEL by 2008 WHO criteria was reclassified to MDS by 2016 WHO criteria. Clinical characteristics of shifted AEL were similar to those of MDS rather than de novo AML.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2018.04.015DOI Listing
July 2018
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