Publications by authors named "Snejana Jurici"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Usefulness of a single-parameter tool for the prediction of large vessel occlusion in acute stroke.

J Neurol 2021 Apr 3;268(4):1358-1365. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Neuroradiology Department, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, France.

Background: In acute stroke, large vessel occlusion (LVO) should be promptly identified to guide patient's transportation directly to comprehensive stroke centers (CSC) for mechanical thrombectomy (MT). In many cases, prehospital multi-parameter scores are used by trained emergency teams to identify patients with high probability of LVO. However, in several countries, the first aid organization without intervention of skilled staff precludes the on-site use of such scores. Here, we assessed the accuracy of LVO prediction using a single parameter (i.e. complete hemiplegia) obtained by bystander's telephone-based witnessing.

Patients And Methods: This observational, single-center study included consecutive patients who underwent intravenous thrombolysis at the primary stroke center and/or were directly transferred to a CSC for MT, from January 1, 2015 to March 1, 2020. We defined two groups: patients with initial hemiplegia (no movement in one arm and leg and facial palsy) and patients without initial hemiplegia, on the basis of a bystander's witnessing.

Results: During the study time, 874 patients were included [mean age 73 years (SD 13.8), 56.7% men], 320 with initial hemiplegia and 554 without. The specificity of the hemiplegia criterion to predict LVO was 0.88, but its sensitivity was only 0.53.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that the presence of hemiplegia as witnessed by a bystander can predict LVO with high specificity. This single criterion could be used for decision-making about direct transfer to CSC for MT when the absence of emergency skilled staff precludes the patient's on-site assessment, especially in regions distant from a CSC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-10286-8DOI Listing
April 2021

Interplay between primary familial brain calcification-associated SLC20A2 and XPR1 phosphate transporters requires inositol polyphosphates for control of cellular phosphate homeostasis.

J Biol Chem 2020 07 11;295(28):9366-9378. Epub 2020 May 11.

Institut de Recherche en Infectiologie de Montpellier (IRIM), Université de Montpellier, CNRS, Montpellier, France

Solute carrier family 20 member 2 (SLC20A2) and xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor 1 (XPR1) are transporters with phosphate uptake and efflux functions, respectively. Both are associated with primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), a genetic disease characterized by cerebral calcium-phosphate deposition and associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The association of the two transporters with the same disease suggests that they jointly regulate phosphate fluxes and cellular homeostasis, but direct evidence is missing. Here, we found that cross-talk between SLC20A2 and XPR1 regulates phosphate homeostasis, and we identified XPR1 as a key inositol polyphosphate (IP)-dependent regulator of this process. We found that overexpression of WT SLC20A2 increased phosphate uptake, as expected, but also unexpectedly increased phosphate efflux, whereas PFBC-associated SLC20A2 variants did not. Conversely, SLC20A2 depletion decreased phosphate uptake only slightly, most likely compensated for by the related SLC20A1 transporter, but strongly decreased XPR1-mediated phosphate efflux. The SLC20A2-XPR1 axis maintained constant intracellular phosphate and ATP levels, which both increased in XPR1 KO cells. Elevated ATP levels are a hallmark of altered inositol pyrophosphate (PP-IP) synthesis, and basal ATP levels were restored after phosphate efflux rescue with WT XPR1 but not with XPR1 harboring a mutated PP-IP-binding pocket. Accordingly, inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1-2 () gene inactivation or IP6K inhibitor treatment abolished XPR1-mediated phosphate efflux regulation and homeostasis. Our findings unveil an SLC20A2-XPR1 interplay that depends on IPs such as PP-IPs and controls cellular phosphate homeostasis via the efflux route, and alteration of this interplay likely contributes to PFBC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA119.011376DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7363132PMC
July 2020

Complications During Inter-Hospital Transfer of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke for Endovascular Therapy.

Prehosp Emerg Care 2020 Sep-Oct;24(5):610-616. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Few data are available on complications occurring during inter-hospital transfer from a primary stroke center (PSC) to a comprehensive stroke center (CSC) for endovascular treatment (EVT) after large vessel occlusion (LVO). Therefore, we prospectively studied data from consecutive patients transferred from our PSC to the next CSC during 4 years to determine the incidence and risk factors of complications during transfer. This observational, single-center study included consecutive patients transferred from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2018. During inter-hospital transfer, all medical incidents were systematically recorded. A new complete clinical examination was performed on arrival at the CSC. Among the 253 patients transferred to the CSC during the study period, 68 (26.9%) had one or more complications. In 11 patients (4.3%) these were life-threatening and required emergency intervention by a physician. Baseline characteristics were not different between patients with and without complications, except for the LVO location. Specifically, basilar artery (BA) occlusion was strongly associated with complications during the transport (p < 0.0005). Complications occurred in 26.9% of patients during transfer. Only BA occlusion could predict complication during transfer. Future studies should identify variables to help stratifying patients at high and low risk of complications during transportation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10903127.2019.1695299DOI Listing
May 2021

Which Patients Require Physician-Led Inter-Hospital Transport in View of Endovascular Therapy?

Cerebrovasc Dis 2019 14;48(3-6):171-178. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Department of Radiology, St. Jean Hospital, Perpignan, France.

Introduction: The current guidelines advocate the implementation of stroke networks to organize endovascular treatment (ET) for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion (LVO) after transfer from a Primary Stroke Centre (PSC) to a Comprehensive Stroke Centre (CSC). In France and in many other countries around the world, these transfers are carried out by a physician-led mobile medical team. However, with the recent broadening of ET indications, their availability is becoming more and more critical. Here, we retrospectively analysed data of patients transferred from a PSC to a CSC for potential ET to identify predictive factors of major complications (MC) at departure and during transport that absolutely require the presence of a physician during interhospital transfer.

Methods: This observational, single-centre study included patients with evidence of intracranial LVO transferred for ET from Perpignan to a 156 km-distant CSC between January 1, 2015 and -December 31, 2018. We compared 2 groups: MC group (patients who required emergency intervention by the medical team due to life-threatening complications, including need of mechanical ventilation at departure) and non-MC group (all other patients who experienced no or only minor complications that could be managed by the emergency paramedics alone).

Results: Among the 253 patients who were transferred to the CSC, 185 (73.1%) had no complication, 57 (22.6%) minor complications, and 11 (4.3%) had MC. In multivariate analysis, MC was associated with basilar artery (BA) occlusion (p < 0.0001), initial National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score >22 (p < 0.005), and history of atrial fibrillation (p < 0.04). Among the 168 patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), only 1 patient (0.6%) had MC due to an IVT-related adverse event during transfer.

Conclusions: Physician-led inter-hospital transports are warranted for patients with BA occlusion, initial NIHSS score >22, or history of atrial fibrillation. For the other patients, transfer without a physician may be considered, even if treated with IVT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000504314DOI Listing
May 2020

Mechanical Recanalization after Transfer from a Distant Primary Stroke Center: Effectiveness and Future Directions.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2019 Nov 16;28(11):104368. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Radiology Department, Perpignan, France; Neuroradiology Department, Montpellier, France.

Introduction: Little is known about the effectiveness of endovascular treatment (EVT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to large vessel occlusion (LVO) admitted to a primary stroke center (PSC). The aim of this study was to assess EVT effectiveness after transfer from a PSC to a distant (156 km apart; 1.5 hour by car) comprehensive stroke center (CSC), and to discuss perspectives to improve access to EVT, if indicated.

Patients And Method: Analysis of the data collected in a 6-year prospective registry of patients admitted to a PSC for AIS due to LVO and selected for transfer to a distant CSC for EVT. The rate of transfer, futile transfer, EVT, reperfusion (thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score ≥2b-3), and relevant time measures were determined.

Results: Among the 529 patients eligible, 278 (52.6%) were transferred and 153 received EVT (55% of transferred patients) followed by reperfusion in 115 (overall reperfusion rate: 21.7%). Median times (interquartile range) were: 90 minutes (76-110) for PSC-door-in to PSC-door-out, 88 minutes (65-104) for PSC-door-out to CSC-door-in, 262 minutes (239-316) for PSC-imaging to reperfusion, and 393 minutes (332-454) for symptom onset to reperfusion. At 3 months, rates of favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0-2) were not significantly different between patients eligible for EVT (42.4%), transferred patients (49.1%) and patients who underwent EVT (34.1%).

Discussion And Conclusions: Our study suggests that transfer to a distant CSC is associated with reduced access to early EVT. These results argue in favor of on-site EVT at high volume PSCs that are distant from the CSC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2019.104368DOI Listing
November 2019

Futile inter-hospital transfer for mechanical thrombectomy in a semi-rural context: analysis of a 6-year prospective registry.

J Neurointerv Surg 2019 Jun 16;11(6):539-544. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Radiology Department, Perpignan, France.

Background And Purpose: Inter-hospital transfer for mechanical thrombectomy (MT) might result in the transfer of patients who finally will not undergo MT (ie, futile transfers [FT]). This study evaluated FT frequency in a primary stroke center (PSC) in a semi-rural area and at 156 km from the comprehensive stroke center (CSC).

Methodology: Retrospective analysis of data collected in a 6-year prospective registry concerning patients admitted to our PSC within 4.5 hours of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) symptom onset, with MR angiography indicating the presence of large vessel occlusion (LVO) without large cerebral infarction (DWI-ASPECT ≥5), and selected for transfer to the CSC to undergo MT. Futile transfer rate and reasons were determined, and the relevant time measures recorded.

Results: Among the 529 patients screened for MT, 278 (52.6%) were transferred to the CSC. Futile transfer rate was 45% (n=125/278) and the three main reasons for FT were: clinical improvement and reperfusion on MRI on arrival at the CSC (58.4% of FT); clinical worsening and/or infarct growth (16.8%); and longer than expected inter-hospital transfer time (11.2%). Predictive factors of FT due to clinical improvement/reperfusion on MRI could not be identified. Baseline higher NIHSS (21 vs 17; P=0.01) and lower DWI-ASPECT score (5 vs 7; P=0.001) were associated with FT due to clinical worsening/infarct growth on MRI.

Conclusions: In our setting, 45% of transfers for MT were futile. None of the baseline factors could predict FT, but the initial symptom severity was associated with FT caused byclinical worsening/infarct growth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2018-014206DOI Listing
June 2019

Target Door-to-Needle Time for Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Screening Can Be Reduced to 45 min.

Cerebrovasc Dis 2018 29;45(5-6):245-251. Epub 2018 May 29.

Department of Radiology, St. Jean Hospital, Perpignan, France.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the median door-to-needle (DTN) time for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment can be reduced to 45 min in a primary stroke centre with MRI-based screening for acute ischaemic stroke (AIS).

Methods: From February 2015 to February 2017, the stroke unit of Perpignan general hospital, France, implemented a quality-improvement (QI) process. During this period, patients who received tPA within 4.5 h after AIS onset were included in the QI cohort. Their clinical characteristics and timing metrics were compared each semester and also with those of 135 consecutive patients with AIS treated by tPA during the 1-year pre-QI period (pre-QI cohort).

Results: In the QI cohort, 274 patients (92.5%) underwent MRI screening. While the demographic and baseline characteristics were not significantly different between cohorts, the median DTN time was significantly lower in the QI than in the pre-QI cohort (52 vs. 84 min; p < 0.00001). Within the QI cohort, the median DTN time for each semester decreased from 65 to 44 min (p < 0.00001) and the proportion of treated patients with a DTN time ≤45 min increased from 25 to 58.9% (p < 0.0001). Overall, DTN time improvement was associated with a better outcome at 3 months (patients with a modified Rankin Scale score between 0 and 2: 61.8% in the QI vs. 39.3% in the pre-QI cohort; p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: A QI process can reduce the DTN within 45 min with MRI as a screening tool.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000489568DOI Listing
April 2019

Identification of partial SLC20A2 deletions in primary brain calcification using whole-exome sequencing.

Eur J Hum Genet 2016 11 1;24(11):1630-1634. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Inserm U1079, Rouen University, IRIB, Normandy University, Rouen, France.

Primary brain calcification (PBC) is a dominantly inherited calcifying disorder of the brain. SLC20A2 loss-of-function variants account for the majority of families. Only one genomic deletion encompassing SLC20A2 and six other genes has been reported. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 24 unrelated French patients with PBC, negatively screened for sequence variant in the known genes SLC20A2, PDGFB, PDGFRB and XPR1. We used the CANOES tool to detect copy number variations (CNVs). We detected two deletions of exon 2 of SLC20A2 in two unrelated patients, which segregated with PBC in one family. We then reanalyzed the same series using a QMPSF assay including one amplicon in each exon of SLC20A2 and detected two supplemental partial deletions in two patients: one deletion of exon 4 and one deletion of exons 4 and 5. These deletions were missed by the first screening step of CANOES but could finally be detected after readjustment of bioinformatic parameters and use of a genotyping step of CANOES. This study reports the first partial deletions of SLC20A2 and strengthens its position as the major PBC-causative gene. It is possible to detect short CNVs from WES data, although the sensitivity of such tools should be evaluated in comparison with other methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2016.50DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5110050PMC
November 2016

Phenotypic spectrum of probable and genetically-confirmed idiopathic basal ganglia calcification.

Brain 2013 Nov 24;136(Pt 11):3395-407. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

1 Inserm U1079, Rouen, France.

Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification is characterized by mineral deposits in the brain, an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in most cases and genetic heterogeneity. The first causal genes, SLC20A2 and PDGFRB, have recently been reported. Diagnosing idiopathic basal ganglia calcification necessitates the exclusion of other causes, including calcification related to normal ageing, for which no normative data exist. Our objectives were to diagnose accurately and then describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification. First, calcifications were evaluated using a visual rating scale on the computerized tomography scans of 600 consecutively hospitalized unselected controls. We determined an age-specific threshold in these control computerized tomography scans as the value of the 99th percentile of the total calcification score within three age categories: <40, 40-60, and >60 years. To study the phenotype of the disease, patients with basal ganglia calcification were recruited from several medical centres. Calcifications that rated below the age-specific threshold using the same scale were excluded, as were patients with differential diagnoses of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, after an extensive aetiological assessment. Sanger sequencing of SLC20A2 and PDGFRB was performed. In total, 72 patients were diagnosed with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, 25 of whom bore a mutation in either SLC20A2 (two families, four sporadic cases) or PDGFRB (one family, two sporadic cases). Five mutations were novel. Seventy-one per cent of the patients with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification were symptomatic (mean age of clinical onset: 39 ± 20 years; mean age at last evaluation: 55 ± 19 years). Among them, the most frequent signs were: cognitive impairment (58.8%), psychiatric symptoms (56.9%) and movement disorders (54.9%). Few clinical differences appeared between SLC20A2 and PDGFRB mutation carriers. Radiological analysis revealed that the total calcification scores correlated positively with age in controls and patients, but increased more rapidly with age in patients. The expected total calcification score was greater in SLC20A2 than PDGFRB mutation carriers, beyond the effect of the age alone. No patient with a PDGFRB mutation exhibited a cortical or a vermis calcification. The total calcification score was more severe in symptomatic versus asymptomatic individuals. We provide the first phenotypical description of a case series of patients with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification since the identification of the first causative genes. Clinical and radiological diversity is confirmed, whatever the genetic status. Quantification of calcification is correlated with the symptomatic status, but the location and the severity of the calcifications don't reflect the whole clinical diversity. Other biomarkers may be helpful in better predicting clinical expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awt255DOI Listing
November 2013

An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia and Anti-MAG Gammopathy.

Case Rep Neurol 2011 Sep 5;3(3):294-300. Epub 2011 Dec 5.

Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen.

We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with typical signs of bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and anti-MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein) antibodies. This unusual association between ALS and anti-MAG antibodies has previously been reported in a single case. Our present case, at neuropathological examination, demonstrated no causative link between anti-MAG antibodies and ALS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000335004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3250649PMC
September 2011

Amyloid-β protein precursor gene expression in alzheimer's disease and other conditions.

J Alzheimers Dis 2012 ;28(3):561-6

Inserm U614, Faculty of Medicine, Institute for Biomedical Research and Innovation, University of Rouen, 76000, Rouen, France.

Several lines of evidence suggest that AβPP gene expression could influence risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a highly sensitive multiplex fluorescent RT-PCR assay, we compared peripheral blood cells expression of AβPP mRNA among sporadic AD patients (n = 133), autosomal dominant early-onset AD cases (ADEOAD, n = 21), Down syndrome patients (n = 21), AD patients with AβPP duplication (n = 9), patients with recent ischemic stroke (n = 25), and healthy controls (n = 58). Compared to healthy controls (median = 0.98), AβPP expression was not increased in sporadic AD patients (median = 1.01, p = 0.42) nor in ADEOAD patients (median = 0.96, p = 0.26). Down syndrome patients as well as patients with AβPP duplication had significantly increased levels of AβPP mRNA compared to controls (median = 1.48 and median = 1.36, p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0007, respectively). A weaker but significant increase in relative amount of AβPP transcripts in patients who suffered from recent stroke was observed (median = 1.14, p = 0.0007). Our results do not support a pathogenic role of AβPP overexpression in sporadic AD although a small subset of patients displays AβPP overexpression in the same range as Down syndrome patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2011-111148DOI Listing
June 2012

Frontotemporal dementia phenotype associated with MAPT gene duplication.

J Alzheimers Dis 2010 ;21(3):897-902

Inserm U614, Faculty Medicine, University of Rouen, Rouen, France.

Microduplications at 17q21.31 have recently been reported in children with mental retardation, autism spectrum disorders and/or dysmorphic features, as well as in a single schizophrenic patient. This rearrangement encompasses the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene, mutations of which are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, no 17q21.31 microduplication has been so far identified in this condition. We screened chromosomal rearrangements in FTLD patients using quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments and high resolution array CGH. We found a 439-kb microduplication at the 17q21.31 locus encompassing the MAPT, IMP5, CRHR1, and STH genes in the index case of a family in which three patients have developed a FTLD phenotype associated with marked memory impairment. None of these patients had mental retardation or dysmorphic features. Since no pathological examination was available, we are not certain that this case corresponds to a FTLD with neuronal and glial tau inclusions (FTLD-tau), and we cannot exclude that any other gene included in the rearrangement might be responsible for the neurodegenerative process. However, the clinical phenotype of the three patients is functionally consistent with the regional pattern of lesions previously reported in mice overexpressing human tau.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2010-100441DOI Listing
January 2011
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