Publications by authors named "Smita R Sorte"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Effect of High Temperature on Cardiovascular Autonomic Function Tests in Steel Plant Furnace Worker.

Indian J Occup Environ Med 2021 Apr-Jun;25(2):67-71. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

Shri Shankaracharya Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhilai, Chattishgarh, India.

Background: The high temperature in the working environment could be one of the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in steel plant workers. The excessive high temperature at the working place leads to altered autonomic activity and is related to more cardiovascular risk.

Aims And Objectives: The effect of high temperature on cardiovascular autonomic function tests in steel plant furnace worker.

Material And Method: This was a case-control study for which 50 steel plant furnace workers and 50 controls were selected. The cardiovascular sympathetic function status in worker and control were analyzed by three tests: (i) Blood pressure (BP) response to sustained isometric handgrip test, (ii) BP response to the cold pressor test, and (iii) BP response to standing from a supine position (orthostasis). Statistical analysis was done by using an independent -test.

Results: Diastolic BP (DBP) response to sustained isometric handgrip and systolic BP (SBP) and DBP response to the cold pressor test showed that the increase BP in workers were more than controls but the difference was not statistically significant ( > 0.05). SBP response to standing from the supine position showed statistically significant ( < 0.001) greater fall in steel plant workers.

Conclusion: The sympathetic autonomic dysfunction was seen in steel furnace workers in response to environmental stressor-excessive heat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijoem.IJOEM_193_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8341409PMC
July 2021

COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease: a review of current knowledge.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 4;42(1):99-104. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

The uncontrolled spread of the COVID-19 pandemic which originated in China created a global turmoil. While the world is still busy figuring out a cure for the deadly disease, scientists worked out on many theories and conducted several studies to establish a relationship between the infection and other known diseases. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the major complications of this infection after the respiratory manifestations. Individuals with cardiovascular complication are said to be more susceptible to acquiring the infection because the novel coronavirus uses the ACE2 receptor for its entry inside the cell and there is a high level of ACE2 expression in individuals with cardiovascular complications because of the enzyme's anti-hypertrophic, anti-fibrotic and anti-hypertensive effects on the heart. Individuals who belong to the older age group are also more susceptible. Knowing the above information, it might seem that using ACE2 inhibitors would help to slow or prevent the entry of the novel coronavirus but it would also at the same time prove to have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system as the protective functions of ACE2 would be lost. While the search for a cure still continues it has been stated many a times that the conditions might worsen with time and the only way to keep ourselves and our family safe would be to follow the appropriate social distancing methods and get a COVID test if we experience any of the major symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2020-0052DOI Listing
February 2021

COVID-19 and geriatric population: from pathophysiology to clinical perspectives.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 4;42(1):87-98. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only led to a worldwide socio-economic depression, but has also had the highest health impact on the geriatric population. Elderly population, due to various reasons such as low immunity, pre-existing co-morbidities such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases or diabetes, are obviously predisposed to develop severe infections and exhibit a high mortality rate. This is because of many reasons which include the atypical presentation in the geriatric population which might have led to diagnostic delay. As per the WHO guidelines to perform RT-PCR only on the symptomatic individuals, a very small portion of individuals were tested, leaving a fraction of population undiagnosed. Therefore, there remained a chance that many asymptomatic individuals such caregivers, healthcare professionals, family members were undiagnosed and might have carried this virus to the geriatric patients. Also, many countries were not prepared to handle the burden on their healthcare system which included sudden increased demand of ICU beds, mechanical ventilation etc. As a result, they had to make decision on who to be admitted. Atypical presentation in geriatric population may include afebrile or low-grade fever, absence of cough, malaise, muscle pains, dyspnoea etc. Geriatric population shows a more severe type of pneumonia, significantly higher number of neutrophils and C-reactive protein, less lymphocytes and a higher proportion of multiple lobe involvement. Extreme social suppression during COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk of mental and physical adverse effects that has made older adults more vulnerable to depression and anxiety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2020-0053DOI Listing
February 2021
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