Publications by authors named "Sirinart Thanesvorakul"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CCR3 and CXCR3 as drug targets for allergy: principles and potential.

Curr Drug Targets Inflamm Allergy 2003 Mar;2(1):53-62

Food Allergy and Immunology Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

Atopic disorders include a range of conditions such as allergic asthma, -rhinitis, -conjunctivitis, -dermatitis, food and drug allergies and anaphylaxis. Induction of T helper (Th)-2 immune response with consequent IgE dependent eosinophil, basophil and mast cell mediated tissue damage is the characteristic feature of allergies. The mechanism underlying this unique and long appreciated feature of allergy is being elucidated at the molecular level with advances in our knowledge of the chemokine system. Thus, chemokines that target CCR3 in concert with Th2 cytokines appear to play a pathogenic role in allergy. In contrast, chemokines that target CXCR3 in concert with Th1 cytokine appear to play a beneficial role. Accordingly, inhibiting CCR3/Th2 pathway using CCR3 antagonists is viewed as a potentially useful strategy for anti-allergy drug development. In contrast, the idea of using CXCR3 agonists to inhibiting allergic response by promoting CXCR3/Th1 pathway faces serious concerns of their potential pro-inflammatory activities in vivo. In this article we have critically evaluated the literature examining the principle and potential of this anti-allergy drug development strategy including a summary of various compounds that are under investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1568010033344453DOI Listing
March 2003

An ELISA-based method for measurement of food-specific IgE antibody in mouse serum: an alternative to the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay.

J Immunol Methods 2003 Apr;275(1-2):89-98

Food Allergy and Immunology Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA.

Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay has been a gold standard method to measure allergen-specific IgE antibody (ASIgE Ab) levels in allergy mouse models. Many factors including stringent guidelines for laboratory animal use make PCA a difficult choice. Therefore, alternative methods are needed that can be readily applied for measurement of specific IgE antibody levels in mouse serum. Herein we describe a novel ELISA-based method that is more sensitive in comparison to PCA, IgE isotype-specific (because it has little cross-reactivity with IgG1 or IgG2a isotype) and highly reproducible (<10% inter- or intra-assay variation). Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of this assay to measure specific IgE Ab against a variety of food extracts including chicken egg, peanut, almond, filbert/hazelnut and sweet potato. These findings are of particular interest to those who are seeking (i) to measure food-extract-specific IgE antibody in animal models and (ii) an alternative to the animal-based PCA method to measure mouse IgE antibodies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0022-1759(03)00008-5DOI Listing
April 2003

Relative immunogenicity of commonly allergenic foods versus rarely allergenic and nonallergenic foods in mice.

J Food Prot 2002 Dec;65(12):1988-91

Food Allergy and Immunology Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, 302-B, GM Trout Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48823, USA.

Food allergies affect 6 to 8% of children and 2% of adults in the United States. For reasons that are not clear, eight types of food account for a vast majority (approximately 90%) of food-induced hypersensitivity reactions. In this study, C57Bl/6 mice were used to test the hypothesis that commonly allergenic foods are intrinsically more immunogenic than rarely allergenic or nonallergenic foods in allergy-susceptible hosts. Groups of mice (n = 4 to 5) were injected intraperitoneally with the protein extracts (plus alum as an adjuvant) from chicken eggs, peanuts, almonds, filberts-hazelnuts, walnuts, soybeans, and wheat (commonly allergenic foods) and coffee, sweet potatoes, carrots, white potatoes, cherries, lettuce, and spinach (rarely allergenic and nonallergenic foods). Primary and secondary immune responses (as measured by specific IgG1 antibody serum levels) were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Proteins from peanuts, almonds, filberts, sweet potatoes, cherries, and spinach elicited robust primary and/or secondary immune responses. Proteins from eggs, walnuts, and lettuce elicited poor primary responses but significant secondary responses. In contrast, wheat, soybeans, coffee, carrots, and white potatoes elicited barely detectable to poor primary and secondary immune responses. The order of the immunogenicity levels of these foods in mice is as follows: almonds = filberts > spinach (Rubisco) > peanuts > or = sweet potatoes > cherries > lettuce > walnuts > chicken eggs > carrots > or = white potatoes > wheat = coffee = soybeans. In summary, these data demonstrate for the first time that: (i) foods vary widely with regard to their relative immunogenicity in allergy-susceptible hosts and (ii) intrinsic immunogenicity in mice does not distinguish commonly allergenic foods from rarely allergenic or nonallergenic foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028x-65.12.1988DOI Listing
December 2002

Chemokines in health and disease.

Vet Immunol Immunopathol 2002 Jul;86(3-4):127-36

Food Allergy and Immunology Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824, USA.

Chemokines belong to a large family of structurally related proteins that play a pivotal role in immune system development and deployment. While a large number of chemokines (approximately 50) and their receptors (approximately 20) have been identified from humans or mice, only a few are known in domestic veterinary species. Recent data implicate CXCL8 (old name, IL-8), CXCL10 (old name, IP-10) (both CXC chemokines) and CCL2 (old name, MCP-1) (a CC chemokine) in veterinary infections, inflammatory diseases or reproduction. There is compelling evidence for neutrophil targeting chemokines such as CXCL8, in ovine bacterial mastitis, bovine pneumonic pasturellosis and equine chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Monocyte and lymphocyte targeting chemokines appear to play a role in caprine arthritis encephalitis (CCL2) and canine endotoxemia (CXCL10). Interestingly CCL2 is considered a missing link between hormonal and cellular control of luteolysis. On the other hand, canine cardiovascular conditions are associated with overexpression of CCL2 and CXCL8. Furthermore, a number of veterinary viral pathogens encode chemokine/chemokine receptor like molecules or chemokine binding proteins that may help viruses to evade the immune system. Here, we provide an overview of the chemokine system and critically evaluate the current literature implicating chemokines in veterinary pathophysiology. Furthermore, we highlight promising areas for further research and discuss how and why chemokine antagonists are viewed as next generation anti-inflammatory drugs for the 21st century.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0165-2427(02)00018-1DOI Listing
July 2002
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