Publications by authors named "Sip A Wijchers"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing elective electrical cardioversion: A real-world patient population.

Int J Cardiol 2021 Mar 2;326:98-102. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

The Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Background: Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as the preferred choice of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation. Randomized trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of DOAC in patients undergoing electrical cardioversion (ECV); however, there is limited real-world data.

Objective: To evaluate the outcome of patients undergoing an elective ECV for atrial tachyarrhythmia in a tertiary referral center who were treated with DOAC or vitamin K antagonist (VKA) without routine trans esophageal echocardiography (TEE).

Methods: This was a retrospective single-center cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing an elective ECV for atrial tachyarrhythmia from January 2013 to February 2020. The primary endpoints were thromboembolism (composite of stroke, transient ischemic attack or systemic embolism) and major bleeding events within 60 days.

Results: A total of 1431 ECV procedures were performed in 920 patients. One-third of the procedures were performed under DOAC (N = 488, 34%) and the remainder of the procedures was performed under VKA (N = 943, 66%). There were no differences between groups with regard to demographic variables (mean age 62.4 ± 11.7, 72% men) and mean CHADS-VASc score (2.3 ± 1.6); however, the VKA group had a higher proportion of patients with co-morbidity. Thromboembolism occurred in 0.41% in the DOAC group versus 0.64% in the VKA group (P = 0.72). Major bleeding events occurred in 0.41% in the DOAC group versus 0.11% in the VKA group (P = 0.27).

Conclusion: In a real-world population, the rates of thromboembolism and major bleeding events were low after elective ECV in patients using DOAC or VKA, even without routine TEE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2020.10.070DOI Listing
March 2021

Extensive scar modification for the treatment of intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia in patients after congenital heart surgery.

Cardiol Young 2020 Sep 23;30(9):1231-1237. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Department of Clinical Electrophysiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Catheter ablation is an important therapeutic option for atrial tachycardias in patients with CHD. As a result of extensive scarring and surgical repair, multiple intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia circuits develop and serve as a substrate for arrhythmias. The best ablation approach for patients with multiple intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardias has not been investigated. Here, we compared substrate-based ablation using extensive scar modification to conventional ablation.

Methods: The present study included patients with surgically corrected CHD that underwent intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia ablation. Extensive scar modification was defined as substrate ablation based on a dense voltage map, aimed to eliminate all potentials in the scar region. The control group had activation mapping-based ablation. A clinical composite endpoint was assessed. Points were given for type, number, and treatment of intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia recurrence.

Results: In 40 patients, 63 (extensive scar modification 13) procedures were performed. Acute procedural success was achieved in 78%. Procedural duration was similar in both groups. Forty-nine percent had a recurrence within 1 year. During a 5-year follow-up (2.5-7.5 years), 46% required repeat catheter ablation. Compared to baseline, clinical composite endpoint significantly decreased by 46% after 12 months (p = 0.001). Acute procedural success, procedural parameters, recurrence and repeat ablation were similar between extensive scar modification and activation mapping-based ablation.

Conclusion: Catheter ablation using extensive scar modification for intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardias occurring after surgically corrected CHD illustrated similar short- and long-term outcomes and procedural efficiency compared to catheter ablation using activation mapping-based ablation. The choice of ablation approach for multiple intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia should remain at the discretion of the operator.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1047951120001900DOI Listing
September 2020

Minimally interrupted novel oral anticoagulant versus uninterrupted vitamin K antagonist during atrial fibrillation ablation.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol 2018 Dec 3;53(3):341-346. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Center, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Purpose: The safety and efficacy of a minimally interrupted novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) strategy at the time of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to compare rates of bleeding and thromboembolic events between minimally interrupted NOAC and uninterrupted vitamin K antagonist (VKA) in patients undergoing AF ablation.

Methods: This was a retrospective single-center cohort study of consecutive patients who underwent AF catheter ablation between January 2013 and April 2017. Endpoints included major bleeding, clinically relevant non-major bleeding and systemic thromboembolic event from the time of ablation through 30 days. Bleeding events were defined by the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) and International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH).

Results: A total of 637 patients were included in the analysis, 520 patients used uninterrupted VKA and 117 patients minimally interrupted NOAC (dabigatran: n = 68; apixaban: n = 30; rivaroxaban, n = 14; edoxaban, n = 5). The rate of clinically relevant non-major bleeding was lower in the NOAC group in comparison to the VKA group (BARC type 2: 2.6% versus 8.3%, P = 0.03; ISTH: 0% versus 3.8%, P = 0.03). Rates of major bleeding were similar between groups (BARC type 3 to 5: 3.4% versus 4.2%, P = NS; ISTH: 6.0% versus 8.7%, P = NS; for NOAC and VKA groups, respectively). Rates of systemic embolism were 0% with minimally interrupted NOAC, and 0.6% with uninterrupted VKA (P = NS).

Conclusions: In patients undergoing AF ablation, anticoagulation with minimally interrupted NOAC was associated with fewer clinically relevant non-major bleeding events in comparison with uninterrupted VKA without compromising thromboembolic safety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10840-018-0417-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292967PMC
December 2018

Coupling interval variability of premature ventricular contractions in patients with different underlying pathology: an insight into the arrhythmia mechanism.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol 2018 Jan 5;51(1):25-33. Epub 2018 Jan 5.

Department of Cardiology, Electrophysiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Coupling interval (CI) variability of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) is influenced by the underlying arrhythmia mechanism. The aim of this study was to compare CI variability of PVCs in different myocardial disease entities, in order to gain insight into their arrhythmia mechanism.

Methods: Sixty-four patients with four underlying pathologies were included: idiopathic (n = 16), non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) (n = 16), familial cardiomyopathy (PLN/LMNA) (n = 16), and post-MI (n = 16)-associated PVCs. The post-MI group was included as a reference, on account of its known re-entry mechanism. On Holter registrations, the first 20 CIs of the dominant PVC morphology were measured manually after which median ΔCI and mean SD of CI/√R-R (= CI of PVC corrected for underlying heart rate) were obtained. Two observers independently measured PVC CIs on pre-selected Holter registrations in order to determine inter- and intra-observer reliability.

Results: The largest ΔCI was seen in the PLN/LMNA group (220 ms (120-295)), the lowest in the idiopathic group (120 ms (100-190)). The ΔCI in the PLN/LMNA group was significantly larger than the post-MI group (220 ms (120-295) vs 130 ms (105-155), p = 0.023). Mean SD of CI/√R-R in the PLN/LMNA group was also significantly higher than in the post-MI group (p = 0.044). Inter- and intra-observer reliability was good (ICC = 0.91 vs 0.86 and 0.96 vs 0.77, respectively).

Conclusions: Low ΔCI and SD of CI/√R-R of idiopathic and NIDCM PVCs suggest that the underlying arrhythmia mechanisms might be re-entry or triggered activity. Abnormal automaticity or modulated parasystole are unlikely mechanisms. High CI variability in PLN/LMNA patients suggests that the re-entry and triggered activity are less likely mechanisms in this group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10840-017-0309-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5797566PMC
January 2018

Ventricular tachycardia in ischemic cardiomyopathy; a combined endo-epicardial ablation as the first procedure versus a stepwise approach (EPILOGUE) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Trials 2015 Oct 29;16:487. Epub 2015 Oct 29.

Department of Clinical Electrophysiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Postbus 2040, 3015, CE, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: The role of epicardial substrate ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) as a first-line approach in patients with ischemic heart disease is not clearly defined. Epicardial ablation as a first-line option is standard for patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Several nonrandomized studies, including studies on patients with ischemic heart disease, have shown that epicardial VT ablation improves outcome but this approach was often used after a failed endocardial approach. The aim of this study is to determine whether a combined endo-epicardial scar homogenization as a first-line approach will improve the outcome of VT ablation.

Methods/design: The EPILOGUE study is a multicenter, two-armed, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial. Patients with ischemic heart disease who are referred for VT ablation will be randomly assigned to combined endo-epicardial scar homogenization or endocardial scar homogenization only (control group). The primary outcome is recurrence of sustained VT during a 2-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes include procedural success and safety.

Discussion: This study is the first randomized trial that evaluates the role of a combined endo-epicardial scar homogenization versus endocardial scar homogenization for the treatment of ischemic scar-related VT.

Trial Registration: NL4816807814v02.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-015-1005-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4627407PMC
October 2015