Publications by authors named "Sinisa Pejkic"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Vascular Injuries in Intravenous Drug Addicts-A Single-Center Experience.

Ann Vasc Surg 2020 Aug 23;67:185-191. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Background: Infected false aneurysms (IFA) caused by intravenous drug abuse are uncommon but challenging lesions. The best approach for the surgical management of this condition is still unknown. The aim is to present a single-center 14-year experience in the IFA treatment in intravenous drug abusers, thus providing additional data regarding the treatment options and outcome in these patients.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of 32 consecutive patients with vascular injuries secondary to intravenous drug abuse, during the period from January 2004 to April 2018, was performed. Data of interest were extracted from patients' medical history records, anesthesia charts, and database implemented in daily practice, or were obtained by personal contact. The diagnosis was set based on history, physical examination and/or color Doppler sonography, multidetector computed tomographic angiography, and digital subtraction angiography. The outcome included graft patency, limb amputation, and mortality.

Results: During study period, 32 heroin abusers, predominantly males (81%), were surgically treated due to vascular injuries, with mean age of 35.2 years. The vast majority of patients have had an injury of the lower extremity blood vessels (84.3%) and the common femoral artery was the most common site of injury (59.4%). Three-quarters of patients underwent resection of the false aneurysm and ligation of the artery without reconstruction of the blood vessel. In 7 cases (21.9%), arterial reconstruction was performed with overall failure rate of 42.86%. The overall mortality rate was 6.25% and the rate of extremity salvage was 96.7%.

Conclusions: The best treatment option is yet to be found, but based on the results of the present study, ligation of affected artery without revascularization seems to be an efficient, safe, and optimal treatment method, with minor risk of the extremity loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2020.02.041DOI Listing
August 2020

Case report of gross hematuria in the nutcracker syndrome resolved by renocaval reimplantation.

Vojnosanit Pregl 2016 Dec;73(12):1178-80

Introduction: Nutcracker syndrome is defined as a set of signs and symptoms secondary to compression of the left renal vein (LRV) in the acute anatomic angle between the aorta and its superior mesenteric branch.

Case Report: A 38-year old woman with asymptomatic and “idiopathic” gross hematuria came to the Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade. Hematuria was documented by cystoscopy and was found to be unilateral, located to the left urethral orifice. The contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan showed a stenotic LRV due to the extrinsic compression in the angle formed by the ventral aorta and superior mesenteric artery (MSA), with a jet of contrast through the lumen. Considering the negative investigations for more common causes of hematuria, its incapacitating nature, and above mentioned imaging findings suggestive of the nutcracker syndrome, an indication for the open surgical correction of the LRV entrapment was established. The patient underwent reimplantation of the LRV into the more distal inferior vena cava (IVC), to relocate it out of the constrictive aortomesenteric space. Intraoperative findings were notable for blood flow turbulence in the LRV and hypertrophy of its tributaries, which were ligated. We presented the first published case in the Serbian literature on nutcracker syndrome with hematuria resolved by renocaval reimplantation.

Conclusion: This case report demonstrates that renocaval reimplantation, as the open surgery technique, could be the adequate method for resolving gross hematuria in patients with nutcracker syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/VSP150401132BDOI Listing
December 2016

Secondary venous aneurysm following intravenous drug abuse: A case report.

Vojnosanit Pregl 2016 May;73(5):500-3

Introduction: Venous aneurysm (VA) is a rare condition that can be presented in both superficial and deep venous system. Secondary VAs as well as pseudoaneurysms are usually caused by external spontaneous or iatrogenic trauma. They are often misdiagnosed and inadequately treated. Complications include thrombosis, phlebitis, eventual pulmonary embolism and rupture.

Case Report: We presented a case of secondary VA of the great saphenous vein developed in a young addict following chronic intravenous drug application in the groin region. Aneurysm required urgent surgical treatment due to bleeding complication as it was previously misdiagnosed for hematoma (or abscess) and punctuated by a general surgeon. Complete resection of VA with successful preservation of continuity of the great saphenous vein was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. Regular venous flow through the great saphenous vein was confirmed on control ultrasound examination.

Conclusion: VAs are uncommon, among them secondary VA being extremely rare. In cases with a significant diameter or threatening complications surgical treatment is recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/vsp140617026mDOI Listing
May 2016

Vacuum-assisted wound closure in vascular surgery--clinical and cost benefits in a developing country.

Vojnosanit Pregl 2016 Jan;73(1):9-15

Unlabelled: BACKGROUND/AIM. Surgical and chronic wounds in vascular patients might contribute to limb loss and death. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC)--Kinetic Concepts, Inc. (KCI), has been increasingly used in Western Europe and the U.S.A. clinical practice for 15 years. Advantages of this method are faster wound healing, wound approximation, lower wound related treatment costs and improved quality of life during treatment. Evidence related to the usage of VAC therapy in vascular patients and cost effectiveness of VAC therapy in a developing country are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore results of VAC therapy in vascular surgery comparing to conventional methods and to test cost effects in a developing country like Serbia.

Methods: All patients with wound infection or dehiscence operated at the tertiary vascular university clinic in the period from January 2011-January 2012, were treated with VAC therapy. The primary endpoint was wound closure, while secondary endpoints were hospital stay, the number of weekly dressings, costs of wound care, working time of medical personnel. The patients were divided into groups according to the wound type and location: wound with exposed synthetic vascular implant (25%), laparotomy (13%), foot amputation (29%), major limb amputation (21%), fasciotomy (13%). The results of primary and secondary endpoint were compared with the results of conventional treatment during the previous year.

Results: There was one death (1/42, 2.38%) and one limb loss (1/12, 2.38%) in the VAC group, and 8 deaths (8/38, 21.05%) and 5 (5/38, 13.15%) limb losses in the patients treated with conventional therapy. In the VAC group there was one groin bleeding (1/12, 2.38%), one groin reinfection (1/12, 2.38%) and one resistance to therapy with a consequent limb loss. Costs of hospital stay (p < 0.001) and nursing time (p < 0.001) were reduced with VAC therapy in the group with exposed graft.

Conclusion: VAC therapy is the effective method for care of complicated wounds in vascular surgery. Patients with infection of wound with the exposed synthetic graft significantly benefit form this therapy. Cost effectiveness of VAC therapy is applicable to a developing country scenario, however cautious selection of patients contributes to the effectiveness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/vsp131222127kDOI Listing
January 2016

Open Treatment of Blunt Injuries of Supra-Aortic Branches: Case Series.

Ann Vasc Surg 2016 Feb 2;31:205.e5-205.e10. Epub 2015 Dec 2.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

Background: Blunt injuries of the supra-aortic branches are rare entity, and majority of patients die before arrival at the hospital. Those who arrive alive require complex and fast procedure that requires sternotomy. We report 3 successfully managed cases.

Case Reports: We report 3 patients with injury of supra-aortic branches. One was treated urgently due to longitudinal rupture on the posterior wall of innominate artery after car accident, and another 2 had chronic false aneurysm located at the very orifice of the right subclavian and left common carotid artery. In first and second patient bypass grafting with a hand-made, Y-shaped, 8-mm Dacron graft from the ascending aorta to the right common carotid and proximal right subclavian artery were performed, whereas in last 1 bypass grafting from the ascending aorta to the cervical part of the left common carotid artery was performed. In our facility, there were no possibilities for any endovascular treatment.

Conclusions: When endovascular technology is not available, open surgical repair of blunt injuries of supra-aortic vessels can be performed without complications. No matter to that, endovascular and hybrid procedures should be considered whenever possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2015.07.049DOI Listing
February 2016

Splenic Artery Aneurysms: Two Cases of Varied Etiology, Clinical Presentation and Treatment Outcome.

Srp Arh Celok Lek 2015 May-Jun;143(5-6):326-31

Introduction: Splenic artery aneurysms are potentially lethal lesions. We report two illustrative cases and discuss etiology, diagnosis and treatment of these aneurysms.

Outline Of Cases: Both patients, age 31 and 80 years, were biparous women.The younger woman, otherwise healthy, was referred from a local hospital 3 weeks after she underwent a left subcostal laparotomy and exploration for symptomatic abdominal mass diagnosed by CT. Angiography established the diagnosis of a large, non-ruptured splenic artery aneurysm. Elective aneurysmectomy with splenectomy was performed using the approach through the upper median laparotomy and bursa omentalis. Postoperative course was uneventful. Histopathology demonstrated cystic medial necrosis with chronic dissection. The other patient, elderly woman, presented urgently with acute abdominal pain and syncope and was diagnosed by computed tomography with a huge, ruptured splenic artery aneurysm. She underwent immediate aneurysmectomy with splenectomy using the same, above-mentioned approach. External pancreatic fistula and pancreatic pseudocyst complicated the postoperative course, requiring open pseudocyst drainage and cystojejunostomy. After a protracted hospitalization patient eventually recovered. The pathological diagnosis was atherosclerotic aneurysm.

Conclusion: Splenic artery aneurysms are infrequent lesions, with varied etiology and clinical presentation. Timely diagnosis and adequate treatment prevent life-threatening rupture and lessen the risk of operative morbidity and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/sarh1506326pDOI Listing
October 2015

Images in vascular medicine. Graft angulation due to the shortening of a body stature - an (un)predictable late complication of axillobifemoral bypass grafting.

Vasc Med 2014 Dec 9;19(6):508-9. Epub 2014 Sep 9.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1358863X14550853DOI Listing
December 2014

Isolated true aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery: a truly enigmatic lesion.

Vasa 2014 Sep;43(5):380-4

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0301-1526/a000379DOI Listing
September 2014

Incidence and relevance of groin incisional complications after aortobifemoral bypass grafting.

Ann Vasc Surg 2014 Nov 7;28(8):1832-9. Epub 2014 Jul 7.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

Background: Aortobifemoral bypass (ABFB) for aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) is traditionally accompanied by substantial groin incisional morbidity, which poses a threat to an underlying prosthetic graft. We performed a study to investigate the frequency and define the clinical course and significance of such problems.

Methods: One hundred twenty consecutive patients undergoing primary elective ABFB for AIOD were enrolled in a prospective study. The healing of groin wounds was systematically assessed, the occurrence of incisional complications of any type noted, and their clinical course and economic consequences documented and analyzed.

Results: Early postoperative complications (30 days) affected 35 (15%) groin wounds in 29 (24.8%) patients. Lymph fistulas/lymphoceles were observed in 15 (6.4%), infection in 11 (4.7%), and noninfectious wound dehiscence in 9 (3.8%) of groin incisions. The only significant predictor of groin healing impairment was preoperative length of stay. Groin incision-related morbidity significantly increased the duration and cost of hospitalization. Sixty percent of groin healing problems were diagnosed after discharge and they represented the most common cause for early readmissions.

Conclusions: The incidence of groin wound complications after ABFB is considerable, their financial impact significant, and delayed onset frequent. Femoral incisional morbidity after ABFB still represents an unremitting nuisance, necessitating further improvements in preventive strategies and techniques and strict adherence to conventional ones, including the minimization of preoperative length of stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2014.06.064DOI Listing
November 2014

Indirect surgical management of a penetrating vertebral artery injury.

Vascular 2014 Dec 25;22(6):468-70. Epub 2014 Mar 25.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Introduction: Vertebral artery injury caused by penetrating neck trauma is a rare occurrence. Direct surgical repair is difficult due to anatomy and exposure. Proximal and distal ligation or/and embolization represent the most common management in cases which require intervention.

Case Report: A young man accidentally stabbed in the neck was admitted to the emergency department with active arterial bleeding from the wound. Immediate surgical exploration revealed an isolated injury of the left vertebral artery intraosseous segment. Lesion was managed by proximal segment ligature and distal Fogarty catheter balloon-tamponade. Postoperative angiography excluded the need for further interventions. Balloon-catheter was successfully extracted after 72 hours and patient discharged neurologically intact on postoperative day 7. Fourteen months later, there are no signs of vascular or neurologic complications.

Conclusion: Balloon-tamponade is a valuable technical adjunct in either temporizing or definitive management of surgically inaccessible vascular trauma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1708538114529278DOI Listing
December 2014

Chronic complete thrombosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm: an unusual presentation of an unusual complication.

Vascular 2015 Feb 24;23(1):83-8. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Although mural thrombosis frequently accompanies aneurysmal disease, complete thrombosis is distinctly unusual complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A case study of a patient with chronic, asymptomatic complete thrombosis of a large juxtarenal AAA is presented along with a literature review and discussion of the potential secondary complications, mandating aggressive management of this condition. A 67-year-old man with multiple atherogenic risk factors and unattended complaints consistent with a recent episode of a transient right hemispheric ischemic attack was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of a thrombosed AAA established by computed tomography. Duplex ultrasonography and aortography confirmed the referral diagnosis and also revealed near occlusion of the left internal carotid artery. The patient underwent a two-stage surgery, with preliminary left-sided carotid endarterectomy followed three days later by an aneurysmectomy and aortobifemoral reconstruction. He had an uncomplicated recovery and was discharged home on postoperative day 7, remaining asymptomatic at the 42-month follow-up. Complete thrombosis is an uncommon presentation of AAA and may be clinically silent. It is frequently associated with other manifestations of generalized atherosclerosis. Radical open repair yields durable result and is the preferred treatment modality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1708538114523955DOI Listing
February 2015

[In situ replacement of infected vascular prosthesis with fresh arterial homograft: early and long-term results in 18 patients].

Srp Arh Celok Lek 2013 Nov-Dec;141(11-12):750-7

Clinic of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia.

Introduction: Graft infection is rightly considered one of the severest complications of vascular reconstruction. Treatment is non-standardized and associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. The choice of therapeutic modality depends upon variety of factors. One increasingly used option is in situ replacement of the infected prosthesis with the arterial allograft.

Objective: The aim of this prospective nonrandomized study was to evaluate the effectiveness and durability of fresh arterial allograft as in situ substitute for the infected vascular prosthesis.

Methods: During period of 2002-2005, 18 patients with the synthetic vascular graft infection underwent partial or complete prosthesis removal and secondary in situ reconstruction using the fresh arterial allograft, preserved under hypothermic conditions in buffered saline solution with an addition of antibiotics.

Results: In 14 male and 4 female patients, mean-aged 62 years, 8 aortic and 10 peripheral arterial infected prostheses were partially or completely replaced with the allograft. Operative mortality was 27.8% and amputation rate was 22.2%. Systemic sepsis at initial presentation and highly virulent nature of causative microorganisms were identified as significant negative prognostic factors (chi2 test, p < 0.05). During the long-term follow-up (mean 47 months), allograft aneurysm developed in three patients, requiring allograft explantation, followed in two cases by tertiary prosthetic reconstruction.

Conclusion: Substitution of the infected prosthesis with the arterial allograft could be successful if used selectively--for less virulent and localized infections of extracavitary grafts. Close follow-up is mandatory for timely diagnosis of late homograft lesions and its eventual replacement with more durable prosthetic material.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/sarh1312750pDOI Listing
October 2015

Steal phenomena in TEVAR, a reality after all.

Vascular 2014 Apr 23;22(2):157. Epub 2013 Sep 23.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1708538113492726DOI Listing
April 2014

Vascular graft thrombosis secondary to activated protein C resistance: a case report and literature review.

Vascular 2014 Feb 13;22(1):71-6. Epub 2013 May 13.

Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.

Hypercoagulability is a well-documented and prominent risk factor for venous thromboembolism. The role of thrombophilia in arterial thrombotic events is less well defined. A 52-year-old male patient with multiple atherogenic risk factors was admitted for non-healing pedal ulcer and absent distal pulses. Based on the clinical presentation, Doppler ultrasound and angiography findings, the patient underwent elective in situ bypass arterial reconstruction. The saphenous vein graft was of satisfactory quality and the procedure went routinely. Acute graft thrombosis on postoperative day 0 was recognized immediately and prompted an emergent surgical revision. No technical errors or anatomical/mechanical causes for failed reconstruction were found and the graft was successfully thrombectomized using a Fogarty balloon-catheter. Graft rethrombosis, however, ensued after several hours. Considering the absence of threatening limb ischemia and the idiopathic recurrent thrombosis, raising suspicion of prothrombotic state, conservative treatment was pursued. Postoperative thrombophilia testing proved positive for activated protein C resistance, mandating introduction of chronic oral anticoagulation. Six months later, the operated extremity is viable. Inexplicable vascular graft thrombosis, particularly if early and recurrent, should raise suspicion of underlying thrombophilia. If confirmed by laboratory testing, long-term secondary antithrombotic prophylaxis may be required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1708538113478414DOI Listing
February 2014

Syndactylization as a technique in treatment of infectious limb following aortobifemoral reconstruction.

Vascular 2013 Jun;21(3):157-8

Clinic of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade 11 000, Serbia.

The infection in vascular surgery is a nightmare of every vascular surgeon. There are numerous ways of treatment but neither one is definitive. We present the case of the patient with infectious limb following aortobifemoral reconstruction treated by partial graft extirpation and with re-implantation of the superficial femoral artery into deep femoral artery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1708538112473971DOI Listing
June 2013

Technical considerations for transabdominal aortic reconstruction with renal fusion and ectopia: case series.

Vascular 2010 Sep-Oct;18(5):269-74

Department of Vascular Surgery, Inastitute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Clinical Center of Serbia, 8 K. Todorovica Street, Belgrade, Serbia.

Aortic diseases associated with renal anomalies can present special challenges during surgery of the abdominal aorta. The aim of this paper is evaluation of morbidity and definition of optimal management according to the clinical histories of 30 patients with horseshoe and ectopic kidneys who underwent surgical procedures on the abdominal aorta over a 20-year period. Twenty-two of them had horseshoe kidney and eight had ectopic kidney. Indications for surgery included aortic aneurysms in 25 patients and aortoiliac occlusive disease in 5. Preoperative diagnostics were performed in all cases by means of computed tomography and angiography (except in the cases with ruptures) associated with duplex ultrasonography. In patients with ectopic kidney a Carrel patch technique was used for the reimplantation of the renal arteries into the body of the bifurcated (four cases) or tubular (four cases) Dacron graft in five (62.5%) cases whereas aortorenal bypass with Dacron graft was obtained in three cases (37.5%). Sixteen patients from the horseshoe kidney group required renal revascularization (reimplantation using Carrel patch in 10 patients and aortorenal bypass using Dacron graft in 6 patients). Two patients, both with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms died after the operation. In other cases the average follow up period was 6.2 years (6 months to 17 years). In one case control, angiography after 6 months revealed an occluded left renal artery that was reimplanted by Carrel patch but without repercussions on the renal function. Aortic surgery in patients with renal anomalies can be safely performed without increased mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2310/6670.2010.00048DOI Listing
December 2010

Aorto-left renal vein fistula is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm with unique clinical presentation.

J Vasc Surg 2010 Dec;52(6):1658-61

Clinical Centre of Serbia, Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, 8, Koste Todorovica st., 11000 Belgrade, Republic of Serbia.

Spontaneous aorto-left renal vein fistulas (ALRVF) are extremely rare, with only 30 cases presented in the literature. In the majority of the reported cases, the fistula involved an anomalous retroaortic left renal vein. In some aspects, the clinical findings differ from those of aortocaval fistulas, often making the correct diagnosis difficult and contributing to the delay in treatment. In this article, we present 2 such cases, review previously reported data, and discuss clinical features and treatment options of this rare condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2010.07.018DOI Listing
December 2010

Arterial complications of thoracic outlet syndrome.

Am Surg 2009 Mar;75(3):235-9

Clinic for Vascular Surgery, Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the Serbian Clinical Centre, Belgrade, Serbia.

Arterial complications of thoracic outlet compression have serious potential implications; however, these complications rarely appear. Between 1990 and 2006, prospectively collected data on 27 patients with arterial complications of thoracic outlet syndrome were analyzed. The causes of arterial compression were cervical rib (20 [74.1%]), abnormalities of the first thoracic rib (three [11.1%]), soft tissue anomalies (two [7.4%]), and hypertrophic callus after clavicle fracture (two [7.4%]). In all cases, a combined supraclavicular and infraclavicular approach was used. Decompression was achieved by cervical rib excision in 13 (48.1%) patients, combined cervical and first rib excision in seven (26%), and first rib excision in six (22.2%). Associated vascular procedures included resection and replacement of the subclavian artery (26 [97.3%]), one subclavian-axillary and one axillary-brachial bypass as well as 17 (63%) brachial embolectomies. The mean follow-up period was 7 years 4 months (range, 1-16 years). Two pleural entries, two transient brachial plexus injuries, and one subclavian artery rethrombosis were found. Complete resolution of symptoms with a return to full activity was noted in all cases. In surgical treatment, a combined anterior supraclavicular and infraclavicular approach is recommended as well as transbrachial embolectomy in all cases with symptoms of distal embolization.
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March 2009

[Primary varicose veins: frequency, clinical significance and surgical treatment].

Srp Arh Celok Lek 2004 Nov-Dec;132(11-12):398-403

Introduction: According to the definition of the World Health Organization, varicose veins represent abnormally enlarged superficial veins having baggy or cylindrical shape. The most frequent cause of primary varicose veins is the insufficiency of long saphenous vein (LSV), but especially the basin of its connection with femoral vein and perforating veins.

Objective: The objectives of these investigations were: the determination of insufficiency incidence of SSV in cases of LSV insufficiency; the establishment of association of insufficiency of perforating veins of the basin of LSV and SSV; the study of the results of surgical treatment of insufficiency and varicosity of both short and long saphenous veins.

Methods: In this study, 100 patients (66 women and 34 men), average age 52.1 years, with clinical symptoms showing the insufficiency and varicosity of long saphenous vein with no change of deep vein system were examined. Ultrasonographic examinations were made using Color Doppler probes--7.5 and 3.75 MHz (Toshiba Corevison SSA 350 A); the development of incompetence of long saphenous vein (LSV) and short saphenous vein (SSV) at the level of the junction as well as other incompetent valves were examined. The reflux was defined as a retrograde flow of the duration longer than 0.5 seconds.

Results: The insufficiency of short saphenous vein was determined by ultrasonographic examination in 34%, while the insufficiency of perforating veins in 80% of patients. 40% of patients were operated (33.3% of females, and 52.9% of males). The most frequent indications for surgical treatment of superficial veins insufficiency were: strong varicosities, clear symptoms and signs, superficial thrombophlebitis and conditions after superficial thrombophlebitis. Surgical treatment was applied in 16% of patients due to recurrence in the basin of long saphenous vein, and in 6% of cases because of the recurrence in the basin of short saphenous vein. Data analysis failed to discover any statistically significant difference between the age of patients and varicosities in the basin of long saphenous vein as well as in the basin of short saphenous vein (51.98 +/- 9.97 years; 54.50 +/- 31.82 years; t=0.36; p>0.05), or any significant difference of BMI value, with regard to the obesity of patients and varicosities in the basin of long saphenous vein as well as in the basin of short saphenous vein (28.02 +/- 4.61 kg/m2; 24.50 +/- 6.36 kg/m2; t=0.50; p>0.05). No statistically significant correlation was found between Color Duplex findings of insufficiency of both long saphenous vein and short saphenous vein (p=-0.21; p>0.05), nor any significant correlation of Color Duplex findings of perforating veins insufficiency in the basin of long saphenous vein and short saphenous vein (p=-0.115; p>0.05).

Conclusion: The incidence of insufficiency is significant: approximately every third patient has short saphenous vein insufficiency, while three third of patients have perforating veins insufficiency. Color Duplex limb's veins ultrasonography is highly reliable method for the examination and study of superficial veins diseases, which is very important for preoperative decision-making and selection of surgical technique as well as for postoperative follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2298/sarh0412398vDOI Listing
October 2005

Subclavian artery aneurysms.

Asian J Surg 2003 Jan;26(1):7-11; discussion 12

Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Yugoslavia.

We report the management of 14 subclavian artery aneurysms (13 true, one false) occurring in seven male and seven female patients (average age, 48 years). The aetiology of the aneurysms included thoracic outlet syndrome in eight, atherosclerosis in five and infection in one patient. Twelve aneurysms were of extrathoracic location, while two aneurysms were intrathoracic. Symptoms related to subclavian artery aneurysms were present in 11 patients (compression in four, haemorrhage in one, and ischaemia in six patients), whereas three aneurysms were asymptomatic. All aneurysms were treated surgically. The supraclavicular approach was used in 11 cases, and the combined transsternal and supraclavicular approach was used in two cases. After aneurysm resection, the reconstruction was performed with end-to-end anastomosis in five cases and with saphenous vein or synthetic grafts in eight cases. One infected subclavian artery aneurysm was treated with carotid to axillary saphenous vein bypass after exclusion of the aneurysm. Five associated brachial embolectomies and one bypass from the axillary to the distal brachial artery were performed. In all thoracic outlet syndrome cases, decompression at the thoracic outlet was also performed. There was no operative mortality, and the early patency rate was 100%. The follow-up period was from 6 months to 10 years (mean, 3.92 years). During this period, one patient died of malignancy and one patient required reoperation due to aneurysmal degeneration of the saphenous vein graft. Surgical treatment is recommended for all patients with subclavian artery aneurysms to prevent potential complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1015-9584(09)60206-2DOI Listing
January 2003
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