Publications by authors named "Sina Madani"

8 Publications

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The First Inherited Retinal Disease Registry in Iran: Research Protocol and Results of a Pilot Study.

Arch Iran Med 2020 07 1;23(7):445-454. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Ophthalmic Research Center, Research Institute for Ophthalmology and Vision Science, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: To describe the protocol for developing a national inherited retinal disease (IRD) registry in Iran and present its initial report.

Methods: This community-based participatory research was approved by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran in 2016. To provide the minimum data set (MDS), several focus group meetings were held. The final MDS was handed over to an engineering team to develop a web-based software. In the pilot phase, the software was set up in two referral centers in Iran. Final IRD diagnosis was made based on clinical manifestations and genetic findings. Ultimately, patient registration was done based on all clinical and non-clinical manifestations.

Results: Initially, a total of 151 data elements were approved with Delphi technique. The registry software went live at www. IRDReg.org based on DHIS2 open source license agreement since February 2016. So far, a total of 1001 patients have been registered with a mean age of 32.41±15.60 years (range, 3 months to 74 years). The majority of the registered patients had retinitis pigmentosa (42%, 95% CI: 38.9% to 45%). Genetic testing was done for approximately 20% of the registered individuals.

Conclusion: Our study shows successful web-based software design and data collection as a proof of concept for the first IRD registry in Iran. Multicenter integration of the IRD registry in medical centers throughout the country is well underway as planned. These data will assist researchers to rapidly access information about the distribution and genetic patterns of this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/aim.2020.41DOI Listing
July 2020

Concept based auto-assignment of healthcare questions to domain experts in online Q&A communities.

Int J Med Inform 2020 05 6;137:104108. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Department of Medical Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Healthcare consumers are increasingly turning to the online health Q&A communities to seek answers for their questions because current general search engines are unable to digest complex health-related questions. Q&A communities are platforms where users ask unstructured questions from different healthcare topics.

Objectives: This study aimed to provide a concept-based approach to automatically assign health questions to the appropriate domain experts.

Methods: We developed three processes for (1) expert profiling, (2) question analysis and (3) similarity calculation and assignment. Semantic weight of concepts combined with TF-IDF weighting comprised vectors of concepts as expert profiles. Subsequently, the similarity between submitted questions and expert profiles was calculated to find a relevant expert.

Results: We randomly selected 345 questions posted by consumers for 38 experts in 13 health topics from NetWellness as input data. Our results showed the precision and recall of our proposed method for the studied topics were between 63 %-92 % and 61 %-100 %, respectively. The calculated F-measure in selected topics was between 62 % (Addiction and Substance Abuse) and 94 % (Eye and Vision Care) with a combined F-measure of 80 %.

Conclusions: Concept-based methods using unified medical language system and natural language processing techniques could automatically assign actual health questions in different topics to the relevant domain experts with good performance metrics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2020.104108DOI Listing
May 2020

Similarity of medical concepts in question and answering of health communities.

Health Informatics J 2020 06 22;26(2):1443-1454. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

The ability to automatically categorize submitted questions based on topics and suggest similar question and answer to the users reduces the number of redundant questions. Our objective was to compare intra-topic and inter-topic similarity between question and answers by using concept-based similarity computing analysis. We gathered existing question and answers from several popular online health communities. Then, Unified Medical Language System concepts related to selected questions and experts in different topics were extracted and weighted by term frequency -inverse document frequency values. Finally, the similarity between weighted vectors of Unified Medical Language System concepts was computed. Our result showed a considerable gap between intra-topic and inter-topic similarities in such a way that the average of intra-topic similarity (0.095, 0.192, and 0.110, respectively) was higher than the average of inter-topic similarity (0.012, 0.025, and 0.018, respectively) for questions of the top 3 popular online communities including NetWellness, WebMD, and Yahoo Answers. Similarity scores between the content of questions answered by experts in the same and different topics were calculated as 0.51 and 0.11, respectively. Concept-based similarity computing methods can be used in developing intelligent question and answering retrieval systems that contain auto recommendation functionality for similar questions and experts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1460458219881333DOI Listing
June 2020

Implementing an interface terminology for structured clinical documentation.

J Am Med Inform Assoc 2013 Jun 5;20(e1):e178-82. Epub 2013 Feb 5.

Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-8340, USA.

Clinically oriented interface terminologies support interactions between humans and computer programs that accept structured entry of healthcare information. This manuscript describes efforts over the past decade to introduce an interface terminology called CHISL (Categorical Health Information Structured Lexicon) into clinical practice as part of a computer-based documentation application at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Vanderbilt supports a spectrum of electronic documentation modalities, ranging from transcribed dictation, to a partial template of free-form notes, to strict, structured data capture. Vanderbilt encourages clinicians to use what they perceive as the most appropriate form of clinical note entry for each given clinical situation. In this setting, CHISL occupies an important niche in clinical documentation. This manuscript reports challenges developers faced in deploying CHISL, and discusses observations about its usage, but does not review other relevant work in the field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/amiajnl-2012-001384DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3715351PMC
June 2013

Identification of pre-coordinated term candidates in a Cardiology Outpatient Service.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc 2008 Nov 6:1036. Epub 2008 Nov 6.

Department of Information Technology Integration, Vanderbilit University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.

Structured data entry systems have been used to facilitate detailed categorical entries which may be subsequently used for computer-assisted decision support. While these highly organized entry systems may encourage providers to document clinical findings more precisely, the detailed nature of these entries may prove more time consuming than traditional data collection systems. We retrospectively examine results entered in our structured entry system in this study for pre-coordination opportunities as a potential enhancement to the system.
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November 2008

Prevalence and inaccessibility of URLs in the biomedical literature.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc 2006 :1019

Dept. of Biomedical Informatics, Emergency Medicine,Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

The World Wide Web is a dynamic environment that does not guarantee permanent access or content stability. We determined the prevalence of URLs in forthcoming, biomedical papers when they are first released in MEDLINE(R) and prospectively evaluated the rate of inaccessible URLs during a 19-day period. Among 96,153 references from 2,614 forthcoming papers (739 journals) the prevalence of URLs was 0.59%. The rate of inaccessible URLs was 12.4% when first available to the public community.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1839732PMC
September 2007

The prevalence and inaccessibility of Internet references in the biomedical literature at the time of publication.

J Am Med Inform Assoc 2007 Mar-Apr;14(2):232-4. Epub 2007 Jan 9.

Department of Biomedical Informatics, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2209 Garland Ave., Nashville, TN 37232-8340, USA.

Objectives: To determine the prevalence and inaccessibility of Internet references in the bibliography of biomedical publications when first released in PubMed.

Methods: During a one-month observational study period (Feb 21 to Mar 21, 2006) the Internet citations from a 20% random sample of all forthcoming publications released in PubMed during the previous day were identified. Attempts to access the referenced Internet citations were completed within one day and inaccessible Internet citations were recorded.

Results: The study included 4,699 publications from 844 different journals. Among the 141,845 references there were 840 (0.6%) Internet citations. One or more Internet references were cited in 403 (8.6%) articles. From the 840 Internet references, 11.9% were already inaccessible within two days after an article's release to the public.

Conclusion: The prevalence of Internet citations in journals included in PubMed is small (<1%); however, the inaccessibility rate at the time of publication is considered substantial. Authors, editors, and publishers need to take responsibility for providing accurate and accessible Internet references.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1197/jamia.M2243DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2213465PMC
April 2007

Factors affecting the sustainability of information technology applications in health care.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc 2003 :922

Dept. of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

Biomedical informatics is a relatively new field; sustainability of information technology applications has not been studied in detail. We examined what factors contribute to sustainability in other fields (ecology, construction materials, business, primary health care, and environment and development). We describe some aspects of sustainability that can be applied to biomedical informatics: effectiveness, efficiency, financial viability, reproducibility, and portability.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1479905PMC
December 2004
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