Publications by authors named "Simone Sleep"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Maternal diet high in linoleic acid alters offspring fatty acids and cardiovascular function in a rat model.

Br J Nutr 2021 Apr 16:1-14. Epub 2021 Apr 16.

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Linoleic acid (LA), an essential n-6 fatty acid (FA), is critical for fetal development. We investigated the effects of maternal high LA (HLA) diet on offspring cardiac development and its relationship to circulating FA and cardiovascular function in adolescent offspring, and the ability of the postnatal diet to reverse any adverse effects. Female Wistar Kyoto rats were fed low LA (LLA; 1·44 % energy from LA) or high LA (HLA; 6·21 % energy from LA) diets for 10 weeks before pregnancy and during gestation/lactation. Offspring, weaned at postnatal day 25, were fed LLA or HLA diets and euthanised at postnatal day 40 (n 6-8). Maternal HLA diet decreased circulating total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol in females and decreased total plasma n-3 FA in males, while maternal and postnatal HLA diets decreased total plasma n-3 FA in females. α-Linolenic acid (ALA) and EPA were decreased by postnatal but not maternal HLA diets in both sexes. Maternal and postnatal HLA diets increased total plasma n-6 and LA, and a maternal HLA diet increased circulating leptin, in both male and female offspring. Maternal HLA decreased slopes of systolic and diastolic pressure-volume relationship (PVR), and increased cardiac Col1a1, Col3a1, Atp2a1 and Notch1 in males. Maternal and postnatal HLA diets left-shifted the diastolic PVR in female offspring. Coronary reactivity was altered in females, with differential effects on flow repayment after occlusion. Thus, maternal HLA diets impact lipids, FA and cardiac function in offspring, with postnatal diet modifying FA and cardiac function in the female offspring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114521001276DOI Listing
April 2021

Role of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in fetal programming.

Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 2020 05 28;47(5):907-915. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

Maternal nutrition plays a critical role in fetal development and can influence adult onset of disease. Linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are major omega-6 (n-6) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), respectively, that are essential in our diet. LA and ALA are critical for the development of the fetal neurological and immune systems. However, in recent years, the consumption of n-6 PUFA has increased gradually worldwide, and elevated n-6 PUFA consumption may be harmful to human health. Consumption of diets with high levels of n-6 PUFA before or during pregnancy may have detrimental effects on fetal development and may influence overall health of offspring in adulthood. This review discusses the role of n-6 PUFA in fetal programming, the importance of a balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFAs in the maternal diet, and the need of further animal models and human studies that critically evaluate both n-6 and n-3 PUFA contents in diets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1440-1681.13244DOI Listing
May 2020

Pregnancy and diet-related changes in the maternal gut microbiota following exposure to an elevated linoleic acid diet.

Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2020 02 17;318(2):E276-E285. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Dietary intakes of linoleic acid (LA) have increased, including in women of reproductive age. Changes in maternal gut microbiome have been implicated in the metabolic adaptions that occur during pregnancy. We aimed to investigate whether consumption of a diet with elevated LA altered fecal microbiome diversity before and during pregnancy. Female Wistar-Kyoto rats consumed a high-LA diet (HLA: 6.21% of energy) or a low-LA diet (LLA: 1.44% of energy) for 10 wk before mating and during pregnancy. DNA was isolated from fecal samples before pregnancy [embryonic day 0 (E0)], or during pregnancy at E10 and E20. The microbiome composition was assessed with 16S rRNA sequencing. At E0, the beta-diversity of LLA and HLA groups differed with HLA rats having significantly lower abundance of the genera , and but higher abundance of and . Over gestation, in LLA but not HLA rats, there was a reduction in alpha-diversity and an increase in beta-diversity. In the LLA group, the abundance of , and decreased over gestation, whereas increased. In the HLA group; only the abundance of decreased. At E20, there were no differences in alpha- and beta-diversity, and the abundance of was significantly increased in the HLA group. In conclusion, consumption of a HLA diet alters gut microbiota composition, as does pregnancy in rats consuming a LLA diet. In pregnancy, consumption of a HLA diet does not alter gut microbiota composition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00265.2019DOI Listing
February 2020

The effect of high maternal linoleic acid on endocannabinoid signalling in rodent hearts.

J Dev Orig Health Dis 2020 12 9;11(6):617-622. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.

The endocannabinoid system (ECS), modulated by metabolites of linoleic acid (LA), is important in regulating cardiovascular function. In pregnancy, LA is vital for foetal development. We investigated the effects of elevated LA in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts in vitro and of a high linoleic acid (HLA, 6.21%) or low linoleic acid (LLA, 1.44%) diet during pregnancy in maternal and offspring hearts. H9c2 cell viability was reduced following LA exposure at concentrations between 300 and 1000 µM. HLA diet decreased cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) mRNA expression in foetal hearts from both sexes. However, HLA diet increased CB2 expression in maternal hearts. The mRNA expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in foetal hearts was higher in females than in males irrespective of diet and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) mRNA expression showed an interaction between diet and sex. Data indicate that a high LA diet alters cell viability and CB2 expression, potentially influencing cardiac function during pregnancy and development of the offspring's heart.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S2040174419000813DOI Listing
December 2020