Publications by authors named "Simin Seyedpour"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Targeted therapy strategies against SARS-CoV-2 cell entry mechanisms: A systematic review of in vitro and in vivo studies.

J Cell Physiol 2021 04 9;236(4):2364-2392. Epub 2020 Sep 9.

Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran.

Due to the rapidly spreading of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) worldwide, there is an urgent need to develop efficient vaccines and specific antiviral treatments. Pathways of the viral entry into cells are interesting subjects for targeted therapy of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The present study aims to provide a systematic evaluation of the most recent in vitro and in vivo investigations targeting SARS-CoV-2 cell entry. A systematic search was carried out in major medical sources, including MEDLINE (through PubMed), Web of Science, Scopus, and EMBASE. Combinations of the following search terms were used: SARS-CoV-2, in vitro, in vivo, preclinical, targeted therapy, and cell entry. A modified version of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials and Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory Animal Experimentation assessment tools were applied for evaluating the risk of bias of in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. A narrative synthesis was performed as a qualitative method for the data synthesis of each outcome measure. A total of 2,649 articles were identified through searching PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Biorxiv. Finally, 22 studies (one in vivo study and 21 in vitro studies) were included. The spike (S) glycoprotein of the SARS-CoV-2 was the main target of investigation in 19 studies. SARS-CoV-2 can enter into the host cells through endocytosis or independently. SARS-CoV-2 S protein utilizes angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 or CD147 as its cell-surface receptor to attach host cells. It consists of S1 and S2 subunits. The S1 subunit mediates viral attachment to the host cells, while the S2 subunit facilitates virus-host membrane fusion. The cleavage of the S1-S2 protein, which is required for the conformational changes of the S2 subunit and processing of viral fusion, is regulated by the host proteases, including cathepsin L (during endocytosis) and type II membrane serine protease (independently). Targeted therapy strategies against SARS-CoV-2 cell entry mechanisms fall into four main categories: strategies targeting virus receptors on the host, strategies neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, strategies targeting virus fusion to host cells, and strategies targeting endosomal and non-endosomal dependent pathways of virus entry. Inhibition of the viral entry by targeting host or virus-related components remains the most potent strategy to prevent and treat COVID-19. Further high-quality investigations are needed to assess the efficacy of the proposed targets and develop specific antivirals against SARS-CoV-2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.30032DOI Listing
April 2021

Brucella Pneumonia with Systemic Complications and Pancytopenia: A Case Report.

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2020 Apr 22. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Liver Transplantation Research Center, Department of Infectious Diseases, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Iran.

Iran which is regarded as an endemic region for brucellosis ranked second in brucella prevalence in the world. Pulmonary involvement is a rare complication of brucellosis. In this article, we aimed to report a case of systemic brucellosis complicated with brucella pneumonia. A 39-yearsold man was referred to the emergency department with weakness, productive coughs and severe weight loss during 8 months. Agglutination tests for brucellosis showed high titers suggestive for brucella infection. After 6 days of treatment, the patient clinical state has improved significantly. The patient had systemic signs and bone marrow suppression with pulmonary involvement that his diagnosis confirmed with delay after one year, but with treatment he had a very good outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871526520666200422110306DOI Listing
April 2020

Neurological recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Neurosurg Spine 2019 Feb 15:1-17. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

1Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

OBJECTIVEPredicting neurological recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) is a complex task considering the heterogeneous nature of injury and the inconsistency of individual studies. This study aims to summarize the current evidence on neurological recovery following TSCI by use of a meta-analytical approach, and to identify injury, treatment, and study variables with prognostic significance.METHODSA literature search in MEDLINE and EMBASE was performed, and studies reporting follow-up changes in American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) or Frankel or ASIA motor score (AMS) scales were included in the meta-analysis. The proportion of patients with at least 1 grade of AIS/Frankel improvement, and point changes in AMS were calculated using random pooled effect analysis. The potential effect of severity, level and mechanism of injury, type of treatment, time and country of study, and follow-up duration were evaluated using meta-regression analysis.RESULTSA total of 114 studies were included, reporting AIS/Frankel changes in 19,913 patients and AMS changes in 6920 patients. Overall, the quality of evidence was poor. The AIS/Frankel conversion rate was 19.3% (95% CI 16.2-22.6) for patients with grade A, 73.8% (95% CI 69.0-78.4) for those with grade B, 87.3% (95% CI 77.9-94.8) for those with grade C, and 46.5% (95% CI 38.2-54.9) for those with grade D. Neurological recovery was significantly different between all grades of SCI severity in the following order: C > B > D > A. Level of injury was a significant predictor of recovery; recovery rates followed this pattern: lumbar > cervical and thoracolumbar > thoracic. Thoracic SCI and penetrating SCI were significantly more likely to result in complete injury. Penetrating TSCI had a significantly lower recovery rate compared to blunt injury (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.62-0.92; p = 0.006). Recovery rate was positively correlated with longer follow-up duration (p = 0.001). Studies with follow-up durations of approximately 6 months or less reported significantly lower recovery rates for incomplete SCI compared to studies with long-term (3-5 years) follow-ups.CONCLUSIONSThe authors' meta-analysis provides an overall quantitative description of neurological outcomes associated with TSCI. Moreover, they demonstrated how neurological recovery after TSCI is significantly dependent on injury factors (i.e., severity, level, and mechanism of injury), but is not associated with type of treatment or country of origin. Based on these results, a minimum follow-up of 12 months is recommended for TSCI studies that include patients with neurologically incomplete injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2018.10.SPINE18802DOI Listing
February 2019