Publications by authors named "Silvio Buscemi"

66 Publications

Sarcopenia and Appendicular Muscle Mass as Predictors of Impaired Fasting Glucose/Type 2 Diabetes in Elderly Women.

Nutrients 2021 Jun 2;13(6). Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Magna Grecia, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy.

Elderly women exhibit a high risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but no definitive data exist about the possible role of postmenopausal increases in visceral adiposity, the loss of lean body mass, or decreases in the sum of the lean mass of arms and legs (appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASMM)). This retrospective, longitudinal study investigated whether body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis) predicted the development of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or T2D in a cohort of 159 elderly women (age: 71 ± 5 years, follow-up: 94 months) from southern Italy (Clinical Nutrition and Geriatric Units of the "Mater Domini" University Hospital in Catanzaro, Calabria region, and the "P. Giaccone "University Hospital in Palermo, Sicily region). Sarcopenia was defined in a subgroup of 128 women according to the EWGSOP criteria as the presence of low muscle strength (handgrip strength <16 kg) plus low muscle mass (reported as appendicular skeletal muscle mass <15 kg). Participants with a low ASMM had a higher IFG/T2D incidence than those with a normal ASMM (17% vs. 6%, p-adjusted = 0.044); this finding was independent of BMI, fat mass, waist circumference, and habitual fat intake (OR = 3.81, = 0.034). A higher incidence of IFG/T2D was observed in the subgroup with sarcopenia than those without sarcopenia (33% vs. 7%, p-adjusted = 0.005) independent of BMI and fat mass (OR = 6.75, = 0.007). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that elderly women with low ASMM had a higher probability of developing IFG/T2D. Further studies are needed to confirm these results in men and in other age groups.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13061909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8227668PMC
June 2021

Obesity and Circulating Levels of Vitamin D before and after Weight Loss Induced by a Very Low-Calorie Ketogenic Diet.

Nutrients 2021 May 27;13(6). Epub 2021 May 27.

Unit of Laboratory Medicine, AOU Policlinico "P. Giaccone", 90127 Palermo, Italy.

Vitamin D plays a pivotal role in calcium and phosphorus metabolism, also influencing bone tissue. Several studies have reported that vitamin D blood levels were significantly lower in people with obesity, probably due to its uptake by the adipose tissue. Clinical studies that investigated the changes of circulating levels of vitamin D following weight loss reported controversial data. A very low-calorie ketogenic diet is acknowledged as a reliable treatment to achieve a rapid weight loss. Therefore, we investigated the effect of weight loss, consequent to a very low-calorie ketogenic diet, on vitamin D blood concentrations. A cohort of 31 people with obesity underwent a very low-calorie ketogenic diet for 10-12 weeks. The serum concentrations of vitamin D, parathormone, calcium and phosphorous were measured before and after weight loss; they were compared to a control group of 20 non-obese, non-diabetic, age- and gender-matched persons. Patients with obesity had a higher habitual intake of vitamin D than the control group ( < 0.05). However, the vitamin D blood levels of the obese group were significantly lower than those of the control group ( < 0.005) and they increased after weight loss ( < 0.001). At baseline, vitamin D blood concentrations of the persons with obesity were significantly correlated with both fat mass-kg (r = -0.40; < 0.05) and body mass index (r = -0.47; < 0.01). Following very low-calorie ketogenic diet, the change in vitamin D serum concentrations was correlated only with the change in fat mass-kg (r = -0.43; < 0.01). This study confirmed that patients with obesity have lower vitamin D levels that normalize after significant weight loss, supporting the hypothesis that vitamin D is stored in the adipose tissue and released following weight loss.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13061829DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8226843PMC
May 2021

Mediterranean Diet and SARS-COV-2 Infection: Is There Any Association? A Proof-of-Concept Study.

Nutrients 2021 May 19;13(5). Epub 2021 May 19.

Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, 10126 Torino, Italy.

The aim of this observational study was investigating the possible correlation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeD) and SARS-COV-2 infection rates and severity among healthcare professionals (HCPs). An online self-administrated questionnaire (evaluating both MeD adherence and dietary habits) was filled out by HCPs working in Piedmont (Northern Italy) from 15 January to 28 February 2021. Out of the 1206 questionnaires collected, 900 were considered reliable and analyzed. Individuals who reported the SARS-COV-2 infection ( = 148) showed a significantly lower MeD score, with a lower adherence in fruit, vegetables, cereals, and olive oil consumption. In a logistic regression model, the risk of infection was inversely associated with the MeD score (OR = 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.97) and the consumption of cereals (OR = 0.64; 0.45-0.90). Asymptomatic individuals with SARS-COV-2 infection reported a lower intake of saturated fats than symptomatic; individuals requiring hospitalization were significantly older and reported worse dietary habits than both asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals. After combining all symptomatic individuals together, age (OR = 1.05; 1.01-1.09) and saturated fats intake (OR = 1.09; 1.01-1.17) were associated with the infection severity. HCPs who reported a SARS-COV-2 infection showed a significantly lower MeD score and cereal consumption. The infection severity was directly associated with higher age and saturated fat intake.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13051721DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8160854PMC
May 2021

Time-Restricted Feeding and Metabolic Outcomes in a Cohort of Italian Adults.

Nutrients 2021 May 13;13(5). Epub 2021 May 13.

Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, 95123 Catania, Italy.

Background: research exploring the effects of food timing and frequency on health and disease is currently ongoing. While there is an increasing body of scientific literature showing the potential health benefits of intermittent fasting (IF) in laboratory settings and in animals, studies regarding IF on humans are limited. Therefore, the objective of this research was to evaluate the relationship between the feeding/fasting time window and metabolic outcomes among adult individuals.

Methods: dietary and demographic data of 1936 adult subjects living in the south of Italy were examined. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) were administered to determine the period of time between the first and the last meal of a typical day. Subjects were then divided into those with a time feeding window lasting more than 10 h, within 8 h (TRF-8) and within 10 h.

Results: after adjustment for potential confounding factors related to eating habits (such as adherence to the Mediterranean diet, having breakfast/dinner), TRF-10 was inversely associated with being overweight/obese (OR = 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.07), hypertension (OR = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.45), and dyslipidemias (OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.63), while TRF-8 only with being overweight/obese (OR = 0.08, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.15) and hypertension (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.60). No associations were found with type-2 diabetes.

Conclusions: individuals with a restricted feeding time window were less likely to be overweight, obese and hypertensive. Further studies are needed to clearly validate the results of the present study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13051651DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8153259PMC
May 2021

Interplay between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular risk in an asymptomatic general population.

J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Apr 19. Epub 2021 Apr 19.

Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Health Promotion, Maternal and Childhood, Internal and Specialized Medicine of Excellence (PROMISE), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Background And Aims: Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide leading also to a higher risk of cardiovascular events. We aimed to evaluate the impact of fatty liver and fibrosis on cardiovascular risk in a general population.

Methods: Five hundred and forty-two subjects included in the community-based ABCD (Alimentazione, Benessere Cardiovascolare e Diabete) study were recruited. Steatosis (controlled attenuation parameter > 288 dB/m) and severe fibrosis (low risk, liver stiffness measurement [LSM] < 7.9 KPa with M probe and < 5.7 KPa with XL probe; intermediate risk, LSM 7.9-9.5 KPa with M probe and 5.7-9.2 KPa with XL probe; high risk, LSM ≥ 9.6 KPa with M probe and ≥ 9.3 KPa with XL probe) were assessed with FibroScan. Cardiovascular risk was evaluated by the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk estimator and defined low if < 5%, borderline if 5-7.4%, intermediate if 7.5-19.9% and high if ≥ 20%. Intima-media thickness (IMT) was measured with ultrasound.

Results: Prevalence of steatosis and of severe fibrosis in this cohort was 31.7% and 4.8%, respectively. ASCVD score was evaluated in patients with and without steatosis and according to the risk of severe fibrosis. By ordinal regression analysis, both steatosis (odds ratio [OR] 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-2.33, P = 0.009) and severity of fibrosis (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.18-2.36, P = 0.003) were independent risk factors for a higher ASCVD risk after adjusting for obesity. Subjects with NAFLD, when compared with those without, did not differ for IMT (0.75 vs 0.72 mm; P = 0.11) and IMT ≥ 1 mm (15.6% vs 12.1%; P = 0.24). Higher prevalence of IMT ≥ 1 mm was found in patients at high or intermediate risk of severe fibrosis (24% and 28.6%, respectively) compared with those at low risk (12.1%) (P = 0.03); this association was maintained after adjusting for confounders (OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.01-2.86, P = 0.04).

Conclusion: In the setting of a general adult population, the presence of NAFLD and severe fibrosis are associated with to a higher cardiovascular risk profile, pointing towards the need for specific preventive measures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgh.15523DOI Listing
April 2021

What are the determinants of adherence to the mediterranean diet?

Authors:
Silvio Buscemi

Int J Food Sci Nutr 2021 Mar;72(2):143-144

Dipartimento di Promozione della Salute, Materno-Infantile, Medicina Interna e Specialistica di Eccellenza (PROMISE), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637486.2021.1889995DOI Listing
March 2021

Total Nut, Tree Nut, and Peanut Consumption and Metabolic Status in Southern Italian Adults.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 02 14;18(4). Epub 2021 Feb 14.

Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, 95123 Catania, Italy.

Background: Nut consumption has been associated with cardio-metabolic health benefits. However, studies conducted in the Southern Italian population, where adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been reported being relatively high, are rather scarce. The aim of this study was to test the association between consumption of total and specific types of nuts and metabolic status among adults living in Sicily, Southern Italy.

Methods: Demographic and dietary characteristics of 2044 adults living in Southern Italy were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the association between nut consumption and metabolic status adjusting for potential confounding factors.

Results: The energy-adjusted model revealed that higher nut intake was inversely associated with occurrence of hypertension, type-2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the association did not remain significant for the latter after adjusting for the main background characteristics, while an inverse association was stably confirmed for hypertension (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.46-0.80 and OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.26-0.74, respectively) even after adjusting for adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Among individual nut types, most of the associations were null except for higher almond intake, which was inversely associated with occurrence of hypertension (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.49-0.99).

Conclusions: Higher nut consumption is associated with overall better metabolic status in individuals living in the Mediterranean area.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7918537PMC
February 2021

Influence of Habitual Dairy Food Intake on LDL Cholesterol in a Population-Based Cohort.

Nutrients 2021 Feb 11;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Biotecnologiche, University of Catania, I-95100 Catania, Italy.

Background: Cholesterol has a pivotal role in human physiology, exerting both structural and functional activity. However, higher blood cholesterol levels, especially low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), are a major cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, special attention has been given to the effect of dietary factors in influencing LDL-C blood levels. In particular, much research has focused on dairy products, since they are a main component of different dietary patterns worldwide. A large body of evidence did not support the hypothesis that dairy products significantly increase circulating LDL-C, but no definitive data are available. Hence, we aimed to assess the relationships among LDL-C, habitual dairy food intake and anthropometric variables in a cohort representative of the general population in a Mediterranean area.

Methods: We evaluated 802 healthy adults included in the ABCD_2 (Alimentazione, Benessere Cardiovascolare e Diabete) study (ISRCTN15840340), a longitudinal observational single-center study of a cohort representative of the general population of Palermo, Sicily. The habitual intake of dairy products was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire, and LDL-C serum levels and several anthropometric parameters were measured.

Results: The group with high LDL-C serum concentrations (≥130 vs. <130 mg/dL) exhibited higher age, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), body fat percentage, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, carotid intima-media thickness and glycated hemoglobin. The habitual diet was not different between the groups in terms of macronutrient, cholesterol, egg and dairy food intake, with the exception of the weekly number of portions of milk (higher in the low LDL-C group vs. the high LDL-C group) and ricotta cheese (higher in the high LDL-C group vs. the LDL-C group). No significant correlation was found between LDL-C blood levels and the habitual intake of dairy products or the dietary intake of cholesterol and fats. The multivariate regression analyses (R = 0.94) showed that LDL-C blood levels were significantly associated with the habitual intake of milk ( < 0.005) and ricotta cheese ( < 0.001) and with BMI ( < 0.001).

Conclusion: Our study reported that total dairy food consumption was not correlated with LDL-C blood levels. However, multivariate analyses showed an inverse association between serum LDL-C and milk intake as well as a positive association between ricotta cheese intake and LDL-C concentrations. More studies are needed to better characterize the relationship between dairy products and circulating LDL-C.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13020593DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7916907PMC
February 2021

Polyphenol-Rich and Alcoholic Beverages and Metabolic Status in Adults Living in Sicily, Southern Italy.

Foods 2021 Feb 9;10(2). Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, 95123 Catania, Italy.

Polyphenol-rich beverage consumption is not univocally accepted as a risk modulator for cardio-metabolic risk factors, despite mechanistic and epidemiological evidence suggesting otherwise. The aim of this study was to assess whether an association between polyphenol-rich beverage consumption and metabolic status could be observed in a Mediterranean cohort with relatively low intake of tea, coffee, red and white wine, beer, and fresh citrus juice. Demographic and dietary characteristics of 2044 adults living in southern Italy were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the association between polyphenol-rich and alcoholic beverage consumption and metabolic status adjusted for potential confounding factors. Specific polyphenol-rich beverages were associated, to a various extent, with metabolic outcomes. Individuals with a higher total polyphenol-rich beverages had higher polyphenols intake and were less likely to have hypertension, type-2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.44-0.73; OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.26-0.66; and OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29-0.57, respectively). However, when adjusted for potential confounding factors, only the association with hypertension remained significant (OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94). Current scientific evidence suggests that such beverages may play a role on cardio-metabolic risk factors, especially when consumed within the context of a dietary pattern characterized by an intake of a plurality of them. However, these associations might be mediated by an overall healthier lifestyle.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10020383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7916404PMC
February 2021

Nut and legume consumption and human health: an umbrella review of observational studies.

Int J Food Sci Nutr 2021 Feb 4:1-8. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.

Consumption of nuts and legumes has been associated with several health benefits. The aim of this study was to systematically review existing meta-analyses of observational studies on nut and legume intake and non-communicable diseases, and assess the level of evidence. Out of the six meta-analyses focussed on legume and 15 on nut intake, a possible association with decreased risk of colorectal adenoma and coronary heart disease was found for higher legume consumption, and a decreased risk of cardiovascular and cancer mortality, colon cancer, hypertension and ischaemic stroke for higher nut consumption. The association between legume consumption and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), as well as nut consumption and risk of cancer, CVD incidence and all-cause mortality, was deemed as "limited" due to heterogeneity between results and/or potential confounding factors. General benefit towards better health can be observed for nut and legume consumption. Further studies are needed to better elucidate potential confounding factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637486.2021.1880554DOI Listing
February 2021

Disability assessment in an Italian cohort of patients with obesity using an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)-derived questionnaire.

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2020 11 9. Epub 2020 Nov 9.

Neurology, Public Health, Disability Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milano, Italy.

Background: Obesity is a clinical condition that contributes to the development of related disability in different areas (physical, psychological and social). Multidisciplinary treatment calls for specific instruments able to evaluate all related functional problems. We have developed a tool (an ICF-based assessment instrument, the ICF-OB schedule) to evaluate obesity-related disability, composed of an inventory of 71-items from the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

Aim: The aim of the present study was to validate this new tool for the definition of obesity-related disability. We also sought to examine the relationship between obesity disability, an index of multimorbidity (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, CIRS) and a well-validated score of perceived obesity-related disability (Italian Obesity Society Test for Obesity-Related Disability, TSD-OC).

Design: Process validation of the ICF-OB schedule.

Setting: Baseline conditions of out- and in-patients.

Population: A large cohort of obese patients recruited from 9 multidisciplinary Centers belonging to the Italian Obesity Society (SIO) network, which provide specialized obesity care.

Methods: A total of 353 patients (F: 70%, age: 50.2±12.7yrs, BMI: 41.4±8.3kg/m2) were enrolled between January 2017 and June 2018. The ICF-OB was used to define patients' functioning and disability profiles in order to set and appraise rehabilitation goals.

Results: We described the distribution of body functions (BF), body structures (BS) and activities and participations (A&P) categories and the agreement rates were significant for the majority of these. The ICF-OB was more often significantly associated, and with stronger coefficients, with patients' comorbidities as described by the CIRS rather than with body mass index (BMI). The TSD-OC also presented a strong association with A&P indexes.

Conclusions: the complexity of clinical condition, that generates disability in obesity might be well identified with the use of this new instrument that appear significant related to the perceived disability for each patients and also with their multimorbidity.

Rehabilitation Impact: The ICF-OB shows great promise as a tool for goal setting in the rehabilitation of obese patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S1973-9087.20.06512-0DOI Listing
November 2020

There is a Relationship Between Obesity and Coronavirus Disease 2019 but More Information is Needed.

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2020 08 6;28(8):1371-1373. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Section of General Internal Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.22883DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7272811PMC
August 2020

Endothelial Function in Obese Patients Treated with Bariatric Surgery.

Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes 2020 4;13:247-256. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Dipartimento di Promozione della Salute, Materno-Infantile, Medicina Interna e Specialistica di Eccellenza (PROMISE), University of Palermo, Palerno, Italy.

Purpose: Bariatric surgery (BS) is becoming an increasingly frequent treatment option especially in people with morbid obesity, demonstrating that it is able to reduce total mortality and cardiovascular (CV) risk. Despite endothelial dysfunction is an essential requisite contributing to atherosclerosis and predicting CV events, only some studies have investigated the effects of BS on endothelial function with controversial results. In this study, the effects of weight loss on endothelial function were investigated in obese patients after BS and compared with patients after medical nutrition treatment (MNT).

Patients And Methods: Seventeen obese patients who underwent BS procedures (9 adjustable gastric bands, 3 gastric by-passes and 5 biliopancreatic diversions) were included in the study and compared with 18 obese individuals who underwent MNT. Endothelial function was investigated by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Also, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) was measured as a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis.

Results: At the end of follow-up, the mean weight loss was 18.8% in the BS group and 7.0% in the MNT group. After treatment, FMD significantly decreased in the BS group (mean ± SD before: 9.0 ± 4.7; after: 6.1 ± 2.9%; P= 0.04); however, no significant change was observed in the MNT group (before: 9.4 ± 5.8; after: 8.3 ± 5.3; P= 0.41). The modification of endothelial function was negatively correlated with c-IMT change in the BS group (r= -0.63; P <0.007).

Conclusion: A significant endothelial dysfunction occurred following BS but not after MNT. Furthermore, the decline of endothelial function observed in the BS group might have contributed to atherosclerosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S230684DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7007802PMC
February 2020

Serum Irisin Concentrations in Severely Inflamed Patients.

Horm Metab Res 2020 Apr 20;52(4):246-250. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Dipartimento of Scienze Biomediche e Biotecnologiche, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.

Irisin is a recently discovered exercise-induced myokine that has been attributed the role of favoring white-to-brown adipose tissue trans-differentiation. We confirmed in a population-based cohort that irisin serum concentrations are independently correlated with the habitual level of physical activity, but we also observed an independent correlation with serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), thus suggesting that inflammation may influence irisin production. In order to investigate the association between irisin and inflammation, we measured serum irisin concentrations in a group of inflamed inpatients. We hypothesized that if an association between irisin and inflammation exists, severely inflamed patients, even though physically inactive, might also exhibit high serum irisin levels. We recruited 40 consecutive markedly inflamed inpatients on the basis of serum CRP levels. Their irisin serum concentrations (Phoenix Europe, Germany) were compared with those obtained in the population-based cohort of the ABCD_2 study (Alimentazione, Benessere Cardiovascolare e Diabete) (ISRCTN15840340). The inflamed patients exhibited higher serum irisin concentrations (median: 6.77 ng/ml; 95% CI for the median: 5.97-7.23) than those observed in the ABCD cohort (median: 5.21 ng/ml; 95% CI for the median: 5.08-5.30; p <0.001). Irisin concentrations were significantly correlated with age (r=-0.44; p <0.001), creatinine (r=-0.35; p <0.05), and fibrinogen (r=0.40; p <0.05) concentrations. No association was observed between irisin, interleukine-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha. This study confirms the association between inflammation and irisin concentrations. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms underlying this association and its possible clinical implications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1111-9249DOI Listing
April 2020

Metabolic and Cardiovascular Effects of Switching Thiazides to Amlodipine in Hypertensive Patients With and Without Type 2 Diabetes (the Diuretics and Diabetes Control Study).

Metab Syndr Relat Disord 2020 03 23;18(2):110-118. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Dipartimento di Promozione della Salute, Materno-Infantile, Medicina Interna e Specialistica di Eccellenza (PROMISE), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Different studies have indicated that thiazide diuretics can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether switching from hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) to amlodipine resulted in ameliorating different cardiovascular and metabolic measures in hypertensive patients with or without T2D. This study [Diuretics and Diabetes Control (DiaDiC)] was a 6-week, single-blind, single-center randomized controlled trial. The first 20 normal glucose-tolerant, 20 prediabetic, and 20 T2D consecutive patients were randomized to continue the previous antihypertensive treatment with HCTZ (12.5-25 mg/day) or to switch from HCTZ to amlodipine (2.5-10 mg/day). The primary endpoints were the absolute change in 7-day continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring (CSGM) glycemia, serum uric acid concentrations, and endothelial function [measured as flow-mediated dilation (FMD)]. Other secondary endpoints were investigated, including changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbAc), glycemic variability from 7-day CSGM, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Amlodipine treatment was associated with a significant reduction in HbAc ( = 0.03) for both 7-day CSGM glycemia ( = 0.01) and glycemic variability (coefficient of variability %: HCTZ +3%, amlodipine -2.8%), and a reduction in uric acid concentrations ( < 0.001), especially in participants with T2D or prediabetes. Following amlodipine treatment, a significant increase in both eGFR ( = 0.01) and FMD ( = 0.02) was also observed. This study demonstrates that the replacement of HCTZ with amlodipine has several metabolic and cardiovascular beneficial effects. However, further intervention studies are necessary to confirm the clinical effects of thiazides, especially in diabetic people and in those at risk of diabetes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/met.2019.0099DOI Listing
March 2020

Whole grain consumption and human health: an umbrella review of observational studies.

Int J Food Sci Nutr 2020 Sep 21;71(6):668-677. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

NNEdPro Global Centre for Nutrition and Health, St John's Innovation Centre, Cambridge, UK.

Whole grains have been associated with a number of health benefits. We systematically reviewed existing meta-analyses of observational studies and evaluated the level of evidence for their putative effects based on pre-selected criteria. Of the 23 included studies, we found convincing evidence of an inverse association between whole grain consumption and risk of type-2 diabetes and colorectal cancer; possible evidence of decreased risk of colon cancer and cardiovascular mortality with increased whole grain intake, as well as increased risk of prostate cancer. Limited or insufficient evidence was available for all other outcomes investigated. Overall findings are encouraging for a positive effect of whole grain consumption on certain diseases, especially highly prevalent metabolic diseases, however, uncertainty of some negative associations deserves further attention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637486.2020.1715354DOI Listing
September 2020

Egg consumption and human health: an umbrella review of observational studies.

Int J Food Sci Nutr 2020 May 5;71(3):325-331. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

NNEdPro Global Centre for Nutrition and Health, St John's Innovation Centre, Cambridge, UK.

Egg consumption has been an area of controversy regarding its impact on human health largely due to the content in cholesterol and its potential role in cardio-metabolic outcomes. This study aimed to summarise the level of evidence of egg consumption on various health outcomes. A systematic search for meta-analyses was performed: study design, dose-response relationship, heterogeneity and agreement of results over time, and identification of potential confounding factors were considered to assess the level of evidence. Results from this umbrella review showed a substantial no association between egg consumption and a number of health outcomes, including cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. In contrast, evidence of possible beneficial effects toward stroke risk has been found. In conclusions, egg may be part of a healthy diet; however, additional studies exploring confounding factors are needed to ascertain the potential detrimental effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637486.2019.1648388DOI Listing
May 2020

Resting Energy Expenditure and Substrate Oxidation in Malnourished Patients With Type 1 Glycogenosis.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2019 11;104(11):5566-5572

Unit of Astanteria/MCAU - Centro di Riferimento Regionale per le Malattie Rare del Metabolismo, Dipartimento di Promozione della Salute, Materno-Infantile, Medicina Interna e Specialistica di Eccellenza, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Context: Type 1a and 1b glycogenosis [glycogen storage disorder (GSD)1a, GSD1b] are rare diseases generally associated with malnutrition. Although abnormal substrate oxidation rates and elevated energy expenditures might contribute to malnutrition, this issue has not been investigated.

Objective: To investigate whether abnormal resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate oxidation rate characterize patients with GSD1.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting: Outpatient referral center for rare diseases and laboratory of clinical nutrition at the University Hospital of Palermo.

Patients: Five consecutive patients with GSD1 (4 type a, 1 type b; 3 men, 2 women; age range, 19 to 49 years).

Main Outcome Measures: The usual clinical procedures for patients with malnutrition, including REE and basal substrate oxidation rate (both indirect calorimetry), body composition (bioimpedance method), muscle strength (hand-grip test), and the usual laboratory tests, were performed.

Results: Malnutrition was clearly diagnosed in 2 patients (1 GSD1a and 1 GSD1b), with REE elevated in all five patients, and especially, in the two malnourished patients (+124% and +32.1% vs predictive values using Harris-Benedict equations). The two malnourished patients also exhibited lower basal protein oxidation rates (7.7% and 6.6%) than the nourished patients (range, 12.1% to 24.7%), with higher carbohydrate or lipid oxidation rates. Additionally, the two malnourished patients exhibited higher blood concentrations of lactic acid than the nourished patients.

Conclusions: According to data obtained from our small sample of patients with GSD1, elevated REEs seem to be a common characteristic that might contribute to malnutrition. Low basal protein oxidation rates and elevated blood lactic acid concentrations appear to be associated with malnutrition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2019-00585DOI Listing
November 2019

Dairy foods and health: an umbrella review of observational studies.

Int J Food Sci Nutr 2020 Mar 14;71(2):138-151. Epub 2019 Jun 14.

NNEdPro Global Centre for Nutrition and Health, St John's Innovation Centre, Cambridge, UK.

Evidence on consumption of dairy foods and human health is contradictory. This study aimed to summarize the level of evidence of dairy consumption on various health outcomes. A systematic search for meta-analyses was performed: study design, dose-response relationship, heterogeneity and agreement of results over time, and identification of potential confounding factors were considered to assess the level of evidence. Convincing and probable evidence of decreased risk of colorectal cancer, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, elevated blood pressure and fatal stroke, respectively, was found for total dairy consumption; possible decreased risk of breast cancer, metabolic syndrome, stroke and type-2 diabetes, and increased risk of prostate cancer and Parkinson's disease was also found. Similar, yet not entirely consistent evidence for individual dairy products was reported. Among potential confounding factors, geographical localisation and fat content of dairy have been detected. In conclusions, dairy may be part of a healthy diet; however, additional studies exploring confounding factors are needed to ascertain the potential detrimental effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637486.2019.1625035DOI Listing
March 2020

Insulin degludec and insulin glargine 300 U/mL: Which of these two insulins causes less hypoglycemia?

J Diabetes Investig 2019 Nov 28;10(6):1595-1596. Epub 2019 May 28.

Unit of Geriatrics, Garibaldi-Nesima Hospital, Postgraduate School of Geriatrics, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jdi.13065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6825931PMC
November 2019

Right ventricular diameter predicts all-cause mortality in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

Intern Emerg Med 2019 10 20;14(7):1091-1100. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Health Promotion Sciences Maternal and Infantile Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialities, "G. D'Alessandro" - PROMISE, - A.O.U.P. "Paolo Giaccone", University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) is helpful to differentiate heart failure (HF) phenotype in clinical practice. The aim of the study was to identify simple echocardiographic predictors of post-discharge all-cause mortality in hospitalized HF patients. Patients with acute HF (75 ± 9.8 years), classified in preserved (≥ 50%) and reduced (< 50%) EF (HFpEF and HFrEF, respectively), were enrolled. The mean follow-up period was of 25.4 months. Patients definitively analyzed were 135. At multivariate Cox model, right ventricular diameter (RVd), inferior vena cava diameter (IVCd) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) resulted to be significantly associated with all-cause mortality in HFpEF (HR 2.4, p = 0.04; HR 1.06, p = 0.02; HR 1.02, p = 0.01), whereas, left atrial volume (LAV) was significantly associated with mortality in HFrEF (HR 1.06, p = 0.006). Excluding LAV from the model, only COPD remained an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (HR 2.15, p = 0.04) in HFrEF. At Kaplan-Meier analysis, no differences of survival between HFrEF and HFpEF were found, however, significantly increased all-cause mortality for higher values of basal-RVd, BUN, and IVCd (log-rank p = 0.0065, 0.0063, 0.0005) in HFpEF, and for COPD and higher LAV (log-rank p = 0.0046, p = 0.033) in HFrEF. These data are indicative that in patients hospitalized with HF, EF is not a suitable predictor of long-term all-cause mortality, whereas, right ventricular volumetric remodeling and IVCd have a prognostic role in HFpEF as well as LAV in HFrEF. Our study suggests that besides EF, other echocardiographic parameters are helpful to optimize the phenotyping and prognostic stratification of HF.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11739-019-02071-xDOI Listing
October 2019

Fruit and vegetable consumption and health outcomes: an umbrella review of observational studies.

Int J Food Sci Nutr 2019 Sep 15;70(6):652-667. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

b Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences , University of Catania , Catania , Italy.

The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of current evidence on fruit and vegetable consumption and health outcomes. A systematic search for quantitative syntheses was performed. Several criteria, including study design, dose-response relationship, heterogeneity and agreement of results over time, and identification of potential confounding factors, were used to assess the level of evidence. The strongest (probable) evidence was found for cardiovascular disease protection; possible evidence for decreased risk of colon cancer, depression and pancreatic diseases was found for fruit intake; and colon and rectal cancer, hip fracture, stroke, depression and pancreatic diseases was found for vegetable intake. Suggestive and rather limited associations with other outcomes have been found. Evidence of potential confounding by sex and geographical localisation has been reported. Despite findings are consistent enough for hypothesising causation (at least for cardiovascular-related outcomes), further studies are needed to clarify the role of potential confounding factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637486.2019.1571021DOI Listing
September 2019

The Effect of Lutein on Eye and Extra-Eye Health.

Nutrients 2018 Sep 18;10(9). Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche, University of Bologna, SSD di Malattie del Metabolismo e Dietetica Clinica, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, 40135 Bologna, Italy.

Lutein is a carotenoid with reported anti-inflammatory properties. A large body of evidence shows that lutein has several beneficial effects, especially on eye health. In particular, lutein is known to improve or even prevent age-related macular disease which is the leading cause of blindness and vision impairment. Furthermore, many studies have reported that lutein may also have positive effects in different clinical conditions, thus ameliorating cognitive function, decreasing the risk of cancer, and improving measures of cardiovascular health. At present, the available data have been obtained from both observational studies investigating lutein intake with food, and a few intervention trials assessing the efficacy of lutein supplementation. In general, sustained lutein consumption, either through diet or supplementation, may contribute to reducing the burden of several chronic diseases. However, there are also conflicting data concerning lutein efficacy in inducing favorable effects on human health and there are no univocal data concerning the most appropriate dosage for daily lutein supplementation. Therefore, based on the most recent findings, this review will focus on lutein properties, dietary sources, usual intake, efficacy in human health, and toxicity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu10091321DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6164534PMC
September 2018

Prevalence and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by transient elastography: Genetic and metabolic risk factors in a general population.

Liver Int 2018 11 7;38(11):2060-2068. Epub 2018 May 7.

Unit of Malattie Endocrine, del Ricambio e della Nutrizione AOU Policlinico "P. Giaccone", Palermo, Italy.

Background & Aims: The worldwide spread of obesity is leading to a dramatic increase in the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its complications. We aimed to evaluate both prevalence and factors associated with NAFLD in a general population in a Mediterranean area.

Methods: We considered 890 consecutive individuals included in the community-based ABCD (Alimentazione, Benessere Cardiovascolare e Diabete) study (ISRCTN15840340). Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) were measured with FibroScan. Participants were genotyped for PNPLA3 rs738409 and TM6SF2 rs58542926 variants.

Results: The prevalence of NAFLD in the cohort was 48%. NAFLD participants exhibited elevated LSM values, suggesting advanced fibrosis (6.5% of cases). Both NAFLD and advanced fibrosis were independently associated with traditional risk factors (NAFLD: age >50 years, obesity, hypertension, elevated ALT and low HDL-cholesterol serum concentrations. Advanced fibrosis: IFG/diabetes, elevated ALT serum concentrations). A high prevalence (>60%) of NAFLD was found in obese people, while it varied widely in non-obese people according to the presence of metabolic risk factors. PNPLA3 G variant (OR = 1.33, 95% C.I. = 1.01-1.8; P < .05) was independently associated with NAFLD. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis (high LSM values) ranged from 3.4% (no risk factors) to 60% (presence of all risk factors). TM6SF2 T variant (OR = 3.06, 95% C.I. = 1.08-8.65, P < .05) was independently associated with advanced fibrosis (high LSM values).

Conclusions: In a cohort of a general population, the prevalence of NAFLD was very high, and among NAFLD patients a significant proportion had advanced fibrosis (high LSM values). Apart from traditional risk factors, genetic factors may have a significant role that needs to be further investigated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/liv.13743DOI Listing
November 2018

High adherence to Mediterranean diet, but not individual foods or nutrients, is associated with lower likelihood of being obese in a Mediterranean cohort.

Eat Weight Disord 2018 Oct 9;23(5):605-614. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "G.F. Ingrassia", Section of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the Mediterranean diet and obesity in a Mediterranean cohort.

Methods: The study population of MEAL (Mediterranean Healthy Eating, Ageing, and Lifestyle) study comprised 1814 men and women (18 + years) recruited in the city of Catania, southern Italy. Food intake was evaluated through a validated food frequency questionnaire and the Mediterranean diet adherence was assessed through the MEDI-LITE score.

Results: Individuals highly adherent to the Mediterranean diet (highest quartile of the score) were less likely to be obese (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32, 0.89) despite there was no significant associations when considering men and women separately. The dietary profile of obese and non-obese individuals did not significantly differ, except for vitamin E, processed meat, and alcohol more consumed among non-obese ones. Among the food groups characterizing this dietary pattern, only satisfaction of the criterion for dairy products (< 1 serving/day) was significantly associated with lower odds of being obese. Among other covariates, current smoking was associated with obesity, while high physical activity and regular alcohol drinking were inversely associated. Some differences between men and women in the highest category of occupational status occurred, as the former were less likely, while the latter were more likely to be obese.

Conclusions: Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than its individual components, is associated with less likelihood of being obese.

Level Of Evidence: Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40519-017-0454-1DOI Listing
October 2018

Analysis of miRNA expression profile induced by short term starvation in breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin.

Oncotarget 2017 Sep 19;8(42):71924-71932. Epub 2017 May 19.

Department of Surgical, Oncological and Oral Sciences, Section of Medical Oncology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Recent studies showed that dietary approaches restricting food intake can be helpful to hinder tumor progression. To date, the molecular mechanisms are unclear and a key role seems to be exerted by nutrient-related signaling pathways. Since several evidences showed that non-coding small RNAs, including microRNAs, are correlated to cancer progression and antiblastic treatment response, our work aims to study their involvement in a triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line treated with doxorubicin under Short Term Starvation (STS) condition. Human TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231 and healthy breast cell line MCF10A were treated with 1 μM doxorubicin for 24 h under STS condition for 48 h and miRNA expression profiles were analyzed using Taqman Low Density Array A human microRNA microfluidic cards. In addition, the expression of specific mRNAs and miRNAs differentially expressed under STS was analyzed using Real-time PCR analyses. MiRNA expression profile analysis in MDA-MB-231 and MCF10A cells treated with doxorubicin under STS for 48 h could explain the molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects associated to STS. Among deregulated miRNAs, a subset, including miR-15b, miR-23a, miR-26a, miR-29a, miR-106b, miR-128, miR-149, miR-181a, miR-192, miR-193b, miR-195, miR-324-3p and miR-494, has been shown to be involved in pathways related to drug sensitivity/resistance. The obtained data from our study suggest a potential involvement of some miRNAs in molecular pathways mediating the anticancer effects of STS in doxorubicin-treated breast cancer cells. Preliminary results seem to be encouraging and, in future, could allow the discovery of new potential targets useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.18028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641100PMC
September 2017

Does iris(in) bring bad news or good news?

Eat Weight Disord 2018 Aug 20;23(4):431-442. Epub 2017 Sep 20.

Dipartimento Biomedico di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (DIBIMIS), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Irisin, a novel myokine produced in response to physical activity, promotes white-to-brown fat transdifferentiation. The name irisin referred to the ancient Greek goddess Iris, the messenger who delivered (bad) news from the gods. In mice, it has been demonstrated that irisin plays a key role in metabolic regulation, energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis. New findings from various studies carried out in both animals and humans suggest that irisin might also have other favorable effects, such as increasing bone cortical mass, preventing hepatic lipid accumulation, and improving cognitive functions, thus mediating many exercise-induced health benefits. However, data on the role and function of irisin in humans have prompted controversy, due mostly to the only recent confirmation of the presence of irisin in humans. Another strong limitation to the understanding of irisin mechanisms of action is the lack of knowledge about its receptor, which until now remains unidentified in humans and in animals. This review presents an overall analysis of the history of irisin, its expression, and its involvement in health, especially in humans. Level of Evidence Level V, review.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40519-017-0431-8DOI Listing
August 2018

Characterization of Metabolically Healthy Obese People and Metabolically Unhealthy Normal-Weight People in a General Population Cohort of the ABCD Study.

J Diabetes Res 2017 3;2017:9294038. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

Dipartimento Biomedico di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (DIBIMIS), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

There is actually no consensus about the possibility that in some instances, obesity may be a benign metabolically healthy (MH) condition as opposed to a normal-weight but metabolically unhealthy (MUH) state. The aim of this study was to characterize MH condition and to investigate possible associations with metabolic and cardiovascular complications. One thousand nineteen people (range of age 18-90 years) of the cohort of the ABCD_2 study were investigated. Participants were classified as normal weight (BMI < 24.9 kg/m) or overweight-obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m); they were also classified as MH in the presence of 0-1 among the following conditions: (a) prediabetes/type 2 diabetes, (b) hypertension, (c) hypertriglyceridemia or low HDL cholesterolemia, and (d) hypercholesterolemia. MUH condition was diagnosed if ≥2 of the conditions listed were found. The prevalence of overweight/obese people was 71.1%, of whom 27.4% were found to be MH. In addition, 36.7% of the normal-weight participants were MUH. HOMA-IR, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the carotid intima-media thickness were significantly different in the 4 subgroups ( < 0.001), with higher values observed in the MUH normal-weight and obese groups. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of identifying a MH condition in normal-weight and in obese people in order to offer better treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/9294038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5559951PMC
May 2018

Association of obesity and diabetes with thyroid nodules.

Endocrine 2018 05 23;60(2):339-347. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

Dipartimento Biomedico di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (DIBIMIS) - University of Palermo (Italy), Via del Vespro 129, 90127, Palermo, Italy.

Aim: There are conflicting data concerning the possibility that obesity and diabetes raise the risk of thyroid nodules. The incidence of thyroid nodules is increasing, as is that of obesity and diabetes; therefore, understanding whether these metabolic and nutritional disorders influence nodular thyroid disease is important for organizing prevention strategies. This study investigated the association between thyroid nodules, obesity, diabetes, and dietary habits.

Materials And Methods: A cohort of randomly selected adults (455 males, 746 females; age: 18-90 years) living in Palermo (Italy), a mild iodine deficiency area, was cross-sectionally investigated. Participants underwent high-resolution ultrasonographic evaluation of the thyroid, and answered a food frequency questionnaire. Laboratory blood measurements were obtained in 587 participants.

Results And Discussion: Thyroid nodules were detected in 475 (39.5%) participants. The number of thyroid nodules was correlated with age (r = 0.19; P < 0.001), gender (r = 0.08; P = 0.005), and body mass index (r = 0.07; P = 0.02). No significant correlation was observed between the number of nodules and glycated hemoglobin, serum insulin concentrations, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Age-adjusted and gender-adjusted prevalence of both overweight/obesity and type 2 diabetes of each group of participants divided according to the number of nodules significantly increased with the number of nodules (P < 0.05 in both cases). The group of participants with nodules exhibited a significantly lower age-adjusted and gender-adjusted habitual intake of milk (P = 0.02). Multivariate regression analysis showed that age, gender, body mass index, diabetes, and habitual consumption of milk were independently correlated with presence of thyroid nodules.

Conclusion: This study seems to indicate that an association exists between obesity, diabetes, and thyroid nodules.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12020-017-1394-2DOI Listing
May 2018

Factors associated with mild cognitive impairment in a population-based cohort.

Eur J Intern Med 2017 09 2;43:e20-e21. Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Dipartimento Biomedico di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (DIBIMIS), University of Palermo, Italy; Unit of Malattie Endocrine, del Ricambio e della Nutrizione, AOU Policlinico "P. Giaccone", Palermo, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2017.05.030DOI Listing
September 2017
-->