Publications by authors named "Silvia Amato"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Preliminary Study on the Differentiation of Linseed and Poppy Oil Using Principal Component Analysis Methods Applied to Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy and Diffuse Reflectance Imaging Spectroscopy.

Sensors (Basel) 2020 Dec 12;20(24). Epub 2020 Dec 12.

Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation, (CRC, USR 3224), Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, CNRS, 36 rue Geoffroy-Saint-Hilaire, CP21, 75005 Paris, France.

This paper presents results from the examination of a set of experimental samples using fibre optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) and diffuse reflectance imaging spectroscopy in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) range, combined with statistical analysis of the data for the discrimination and mapping of poppy and linseed oil. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of this non-invasive approach for the study of paint samples with a view to the application of the method for characterisation of the two drying oils in painted art. The approach allowed discrimination between the two drying oils based on FORS spectra and the hyperspectral cube, indicating the influence of the spectral region around 1700 nm on the statistical discrimination based on the anti-symmetric and symmetric first overtone stretching of methylenic CH groups. This method is being studied as a potential non-invasive method of organic analysis of oil types that have formerly been studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which requires micro-samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s20247125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7764422PMC
December 2020

Management of duodenal stump fistula after gastrectomy for gastric cancer: Systematic review.

World J Gastroenterol 2015 Jun;21(24):7571-6

Paolo Aurello, Dario Sirimarco, Paolo Magistri, Niccolò Petrucciani, Giammauro Berardi, Silvia Amato, Marcello Gasparrini, Francesco D'Angelo, Giuseppe Nigri, Giovanni Ramacciato, Department of General Surgery, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy.

Aim: To identify the most effective treatment of duodenal stump fistula (DSF) after gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CILEA Archive, BMJ Clinical Evidence and UpToDate databases were analyzed. Three hundred eighty-eight manuscripts were retrieved and analyzed and thirteen studies published between 1988 and 2014 were finally selected according to the inclusion criteria, for a total of 145 cases of DSF, which represented our group of study. Only patients with DSF after gastrectomy for malignancy were selected. Data about patients' characteristics, type of treatment, short and long-term outcomes were extracted and analyzed.

Results: In the 13 studies different types of treatment were proposed: conservative approach, surgical approach, percutaneous approach and endoscopic approach (3 cases). The overall mortality rate was 11.7% for the entire cohort. The more frequent complications were sepsis, abscesses, peritonitis, bleeding, pneumonia and multi-organ failure. Conservative approach was performed in 6 studies for a total of 79 patients, in patients with stable general condition, often associated with percutaneous approach. A complete resolution of the leakage was achieved in 92.3% of these patients, with a healing time ranging from 17 to 71 d. Surgical approach included duodenostomy, duodeno-jejunostomy, pancreatoduodenectomy and the use of rectus muscle flap. In-hospital stay of patients who underwent relaparotomy ranged from 1 to 1035 d. The percutaneous approach included drainage of abscesses or duodenostomy (32 cases) and percutaneous biliary diversion (13 cases). The median healing time in this group was 43 d.

Conclusion: Conservative approach is the treatment of choice, eventually associated with percutaneus drainage. Surgical approach should be reserved for severe cases or when conservative approaches fail.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v21.i24.7571DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4481454PMC
June 2015

Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

Clin Rheumatol 2014 Jul 22;33(7):981-7. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedic Sciences, Umberto I University Hospital, Sapienza University, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome, Italy.

Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-014-2618-yDOI Listing
July 2014

Ileocecal resection for bowel endometriosis.

Am Surg 2013 Nov;79(11):E333-4

Department of General Surgery, Sapienza-Università di Roma, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant'Andrea, Rome, Italy.

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November 2013

Is conservative management expedient in the treatment of Zargar's grade 3b gastric injuries after formalin ingestion?

Am Surg 2013 Sep;79(9):e294-5

Division of General Surgery, St. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Rome, Italy.

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September 2013

Lack of the QTc physiologic decrease during cardiac stress test in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with secretagogues.

Acta Diabetol 2014 Feb 1;51(1):31-3. Epub 2012 Nov 1.

Sapienza University, Rome, RM, Italy.

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at increased susceptibility to a prolonged QT interval. Furthermore, insulin secretagogues, drugs used to treat diabetes, may prolong QT interval and provoke arrhythmias. We evaluated whether secretagogues can affect QTc interval during cardiac stress test in 20 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with secretagogues. ECG stress test was performed in all patients. QTc interval was calculated both before cardiac stress test (BCST) and at acme of cardiac stress test (ACST). Diabetic patients treated with secretagogues showed longer QTc-ACST values than those treated with metformin only. QTc-ACST values resulted shorter than QTc-BCST values in control group. Diabetic patients treated with secretagogues showed QTc-ACST values significantly longer than QTc-BCST values. In our study, diabetic patients treated with secretagogues did not show the QTc physiologic decrease that is a protective against arrhythmias. These results suggest to evaluate, in these patients, QT length, even during routine cardiac stress test.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00592-012-0438-6DOI Listing
February 2014

Screening for celiac disease in the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type.

Am J Med Genet A 2011 Sep 3;155A(9):2314-6. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

Department of Clinical Science, Sapienza University, Umberto I Hospital, Rome, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.34134DOI Listing
September 2011

A study on QT interval in patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease without cardiac involvement.

Intern Emerg Med 2010 Aug 22;5(4):307-10. Epub 2010 Apr 22.

Department of Clinical Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, University La Sapienza of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, Rome, Italy.

Cardiac involvement has been studied quite extensively in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease but, as of now, there is no data regarding QT alterations which are well known to be linked to the risk of dangerous arrhythmias. In this study, QT parameters were digitally measured on standard 12-lead ECG in a population of 20 patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with no prior (recent or old) history of cardiac disease and no evidence of electrolyte imbalance. Eighteen healthy subjects formed the control group. The results obtained using non-parametric statistics (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test) showed that heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) and QTc dispersion (QTc d) values were both significantly higher in IBD patients than in the control group. QTc rank sum values in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease were 469 versus 311 in healthy subjects (Z = 1.939, p = 0.0263). QTc d rank sum values were 460 in IBD patients versus 320 in controls (Z = 1.686 with p = 0.0459). Regardless of the cause of these QT alterations, it appears evident that accurate monitoring of QT parameters is required in these patients who often experience electrolyte disturbances and who may, in some cases, be undergoing treatment with potentially cardiotoxic drugs such as infliximab.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11739-010-0382-9DOI Listing
August 2010

The loss of entropy circadian rhythm in sinusal R-R intervals of type 1 diabetic pregnant women suggests an indeterministic chaos in cardiac pacing (minimum delirium cordis syndrome). A newly identifiable type of silent cardiac dysautonomia?

Acta Cardiol 2007 Jun;62(3):257-64

Department of Clinical Sciences, 1st Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', Rome, Italy.

Objective: The scope of this study is to detect whether or not the entropy (E) circadian rhythm (CR) is maintained preserved in sinusal R-R intervals (SRRI), its loss being the expression of a transition to an indeterministic chaos in heart rate variability (HRV).

Methods: The E of SRRI was estimated in 14 type I diabetic pregnant women (DPW) in the first trimester of an apparently uncomplicated gestation (7 patients - mean age = 30.3 +/- 4.1 y - without clinical and laboratory evidence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, and 7 patients - mean age = 30.7 +/- 3.6 y - with positive tests for a cardiac dysautonomia). The E CR was studied via the single cosinor method, and summarized via the population-mean cosinor method.

Results: The E CR was found not to be preserved in both the investigated type I DPW, despite the occurrence of the SRRI CR.

Conclusions: The loss of the E CR confirms that in type I DPW there is a transition to an indeterministic disorder in HRV due to the lack of an autocorrelated periodic chaos in cardiac pacing. Such an unphysiological neurovegetative regulation suggests a new silent cardiac dysautonomic syndrome, that we intend to call "minimum delirium cordis syndrome" (MDCS). Can the MDCS be regarded as a condition of cardiovascular risk? To answer this question, it seems justified to suggest that the study of the E CR should be added to the routine tests that are presently applied to clinical analysis of the Holter ECG, being the classic tests of linear analysis not methodologically suitable for detecting the indeterministic chaos of the MDCS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2143/ac.62.3.2020814DOI Listing
June 2007

Increased risk of cardiac death in primary hyperparathyroidism: what is a role of electrical instability?

Int J Cardiol 2007 Oct 14;121(2):200-2. Epub 2006 Nov 14.

Background: Increased risk of death in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is referred to cardiovascular complications induced by hypercalcemia. At the moment the role of bioelectrical risk and of enhanced sympathetic activity, not related to cardiovascular complications, is unknown in PHPT patients.

Methods: The study was designed to evaluate the QT parameters and sympathovagal balance in 28 PHPT uncomplicated patients compared to 29 healthy subjects (HS). Nine of 28 patients were restudied after parathyroidectomy. Standard ECG, short and 24-h ECG monitoring were performed to calculate QT parameters and Heart Rate Variability (HRV).

Results: QTc interval resulted shorter in PHPT patients than in HS and QTc dispersion resulted higher in PHPT patients than HS. The physiological adaptation of QT length to R-R interval was lacking in PHPT patients. Enhanced sympathetic tone was found in PTHP patients than controls. These data were confirmed after parathyroidectomy.

Conclusion: Our findings revealed an increased risk to develop life-threatening arrhythmias in PHPT patients due to bioelectrical instability induced by hypercalcemia. Parathyroidectomy doesn't seem to reverse this abnormality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2006.08.072DOI Listing
October 2007
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