Publications by authors named "Silke Nothdurft"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Statins affect cancer cell plasticity with distinct consequences for tumor progression and metastasis.

Cell Rep 2021 Nov;37(8):110056

Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen at the University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Essen, Essen, Germany. Electronic address:

Statins are among the most commonly prescribed drugs, and around every fourth person above the age of 40 is on statin medication. Therefore, it is of utmost clinical importance to understand the effect of statins on cancer cell plasticity and its consequences to not only patients with cancer but also patients who are on statins. Here, we find that statins induce a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in cancer cells of solid tumors. Using a comprehensive STRING network analysis of transcriptome, proteome, and phosphoproteome data combined with multiple mechanistic in vitro and functional in vivo analyses, we demonstrate that statins reduce cellular plasticity by enforcing a mesenchymal-like cell state that increases metastatic seeding ability on one side but reduces the formation of (secondary) tumors on the other due to heterogeneous treatment responses. Taken together, we provide a thorough mechanistic overview of the consequences of statin use for each step of cancer development, progression, and metastasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2021.110056DOI Listing
November 2021

Functional screening identifies aryl hydrocarbon receptor as suppressor of lung cancer metastasis.

Oncogenesis 2020 Nov 19;9(11):102. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.

Lung cancer mortality largely results from metastasis. Despite curative surgery many patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer ultimately succumb to metastatic relapse. Current risk reduction strategies based on cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation have only modest activity. Against this background, we functionally screened for novel metastasis modulators using a barcoded shRNA library and an orthotopic lung cancer model. We identified aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a sensor of xenobiotic chemicals and transcription factor, as suppressor of lung cancer metastasis. Knockdown of endogenous AHR induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition signatures, increases invasiveness of lung cancer cells in vitro and metastasis formation in vivo. Low intratumoral AHR expression associates with inferior outcome of patients with resected lung adenocarcinomas. Mechanistically, AHR triggers ATF4 signaling and represses matrix metalloproteinase activity, both counteracting metastatic programs. These findings link the xenobiotic defense system with control of lung cancer progression. AHR-regulated pathways are promising targets for innovative anti-metastatic strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41389-020-00286-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7677369PMC
November 2020

Molecular dissection of effector mechanisms of RAS-mediated resistance to anti-EGFR antibody therapy.

Oncotarget 2017 Jul;8(28):45898-45917

Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany.

Monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cetuximab and panitumumab, are a mainstay of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment. However, a significant number of patients suffer from primary or acquired resistance. RAS mutations are negative predictors of clinical efficacy of anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with mCRC. Oncogenic RAS activates the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways, which are considered the main effectors of resistance. However, the relative impact of these pathways in RAS-mutant CRC is less defined. A better mechanistic understanding of RAS-mediated resistance may guide development of rational intervention strategies. To this end we developed cancer models for functional dissection of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in vitro and in vivo. To selectively activate MAPK- or AKT-signaling we expressed conditionally activatable RAF-1 and AKT in cancer cells. We found that either pathway independently protected sensitive cancer models against anti-EGFR antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo. RAF-1- and AKT-mediated resistance was associated with increased expression of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins. Biomarkers of MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation correlated with inferior outcome in a cohort of mCRC patients receiving cetuximab-based therapy. Dual pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K and MEK successfully sensitized primary resistant CRC models to anti-EGFR therapy. In conclusion, combined targeting of MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but not single pathways, may be required to enhance the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibody therapy in patients with RAS-mutated CRC as well as in RAS wild type tumors with clinical resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.17438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5542236PMC
July 2017
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