Publications by authors named "Signe Frederiksen"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Against the Odds: A Structural Equation Analysis of Family Resilience Processes during Paternal Incarceration.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 11 4;18(21). Epub 2021 Nov 4.

Children and Education Department, VIVE Danish Center for Social Science Research, 1052 Copenhagen, Denmark.

On any given day, approximately 2.1 million children in Europe have an incarcerated parent. Although research indicates that material hardship is associated with parental incarceration, and particularly paternal incarceration, little is known about family processes that may mitigate the harmful effects of such hardship on children with an incarcerated parent. Guided by a resilience framework, this study examined how family processes mediate the effects of material hardship on youth academic adjustment within the context of paternal incarceration. Using Danish data that assessed key family constructs, structural equation modeling was used to perform a mediational within-group analysis of primary caregivers (n = 727) to children with an incarcerated father. Results indicate that although social support and parenting skills did not yield mediating effects, caregiver mental health strongly mediated the effects of material hardship on youth academic adjustment during paternal incarceration. Findings suggest that economic conditions, as well as caregiver mental health symptoms, are important areas of intervention that may promote family-level resilience for youth of an imprisoned father. We conclude with research and practice recommendations to advance our understanding of resilience among families with an incarcerated parent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8583222PMC
November 2021

Models of care for patients with hypertension and diabetes in humanitarian crises: a systematic review.

Health Policy Plan 2021 May;36(4):509-532

Department of Health Services Research & Policy and Centre for Global Chronic Conditions, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK.

Care for non-communicable diseases, including hypertension and diabetes (HTN/DM), is recognized as a growing challenge in humanitarian crises, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where most crises occur. There is little evidence to support humanitarian actors and governments in designing efficient, effective, and context-adapted models of care for HTN/DM in such settings. This article aimed to systematically review the evidence on models of care targeting people with HTN/DM affected by humanitarian crises in LMICs. A search of the MEDLINE, Embase, Global Health, Global Indexus Medicus, Web of Science, and EconLit bibliographic databases and grey literature sources was performed. Studies were selected that described models of care for HTN/DM in humanitarian crises in LMICs. We descriptively analysed and compared models of care using a conceptual framework and evaluated study quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. We report our findings according to PRISMA guidelines. The search yielded 10 645 citations, of which 45 were eligible for this review. Quantitative methods were most commonly used (n = 34), with four qualitative, three mixed methods, and four descriptive reviews of specific care models were also included. Most studies detailed primary care facility-based services for HTN/DM, focusing on health system inputs. More limited references were made to community-based services. Health care workforce and treatment protocols were commonly described framework components, whereas few studies described patient centredness, quality of care, financing and governance, broader health policy, and sociocultural contexts. There were few programme evaluations or effectiveness studies, and only one study reported costs. Most studies were of low quality. We concluded that an increasing body of literature describing models of care for patients with HTN/DM in humanitarian crises demonstrated the development of context-adapted services but showed little evidence of impact. Our conceptual framework could be used for further research and development of NCD models of care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czab007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8128021PMC
May 2021

Dietary patterns generated by the Treelet Transform and risk of stroke: a Danish cohort study.

Public Health Nutr 2021 01 24;24(1):84-94. Epub 2020 Oct 24.

Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000Aarhus C, Denmark.

Objective: To relate empirically derived dietary patterns identified using the Treelet Transform (TT) to risk of stroke.

Design: A prospective cohort study using the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Dietary information was obtained in 1993-1997 using a validated semi-quantitative FFQ. Incident stroke diagnoses, obtained from the Danish National Patient Register, were verified by record review. Dietary patterns were generated using TT, and participants were categorised into quintiles based on their adherence to each pattern. Sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models estimated associations between dietary patterns and stroke.

Setting: Denmark.

Participants: 55 061 men and women aged 50-64 years at the time of enrolment.

Results: Three dietary patterns explaining 15·4 % of the total variance were identified: a Prudent pattern, a Western pattern and a Wine & Snacks pattern. During a follow-up time of 10 years, 1513 cases occurred. Comparing the highest to lowest quintiles of intake, adherence to a Prudent pattern was inversely associated with stroke (HRmen 0·74, 95 % CI 0·60, 0·91; HRwomen 0·82, 95 % CI 0·62, 1·08), while adherence to a Western pattern was associated with greater risk (HRmen 1·61, 95 % CI 1·23, 2·10; HRwomen 2·01, 95 % CI 1·48, 2·72). No association was found for a Wine & Snacks pattern for women, but a weak inverse association was found for men (HR 0·81, 95 % CI 0·67, 0·99).

Conclusions: The results of this study are broadly in line with current recommendations for a healthy diet to prevent stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980019004324DOI Listing
January 2021

Cloning and transcription analysis of an AGAMOUS- and SEEDSTICK ortholog in the orchid Dendrobium thyrsiflorum (Reichb. f.).

Gene 2006 Feb 19;366(2):266-74. Epub 2005 Oct 19.

Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Gothersgade 140, DK-1123 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

Studies have shown that several plant species possess AGAMOUS (AG) and SEEDSTICK (STK) orthologs. These genes are part of the so-called C- and D MADS-box gene lineages and play key roles in ovule development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have cloned an AG- and STK ortholog in the orchid Dendrobium thyrsiflorum, named DthyrAG1 and DthyrAG2, respectively, and analyzed their expression patterns. Quantification by real-time RT-PCR analysis shows that both are transcribed in the mature flowers and during ovule development. Localization of the transcripts by in situ hybridization analysis in flowers reveals that both genes are transcribed in the rostellum, stigma, and stylar canal. Expression analysis during ovule development shows that DthyrAG1 is expressed only in the initial periods of placenta- and ovule development, whereas the DthyrAG2 is transcribed throughout ovule development. These results suggest that both C- and D lineage orthologs are involved in various aspects of flower development and that DthyrAG2 have a more prominent role than DthyrAG1 in late ovule development in D. thyrsiflorum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2005.08.014DOI Listing
February 2006

An empirical test of the treatment of indels during optimization alignment based on the phylogeny of the genus Secale (Poaceae).

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2004 Mar;30(3):733-42

Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Gothersgade 140, DK-1123 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

The ability of the program POY, implementing optimization alignment, to deal with major indels is explored and discussed in connection with a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Secale based on partial Adh1 sequences. The Adh1 sequences used span exon 2-4. Nearly all variation is found in intron 2 and intron 3, which form the basis for the phylogenetic analyses. Both in some ingroup and outgroup taxa intron 3 has a major duplication. Previous phylogenetic analyses have repeatedly confirmed monophyly of both Secale and Hordeum, the latter being part of the outgroup. However, optimization alignment only recovers both genera as monophyletic when knowledge of the duplication is incorporated in the analysis. The phylogenetic relationships within Secale are not clearly resolved. Subspecific taxa of Secale strictum have identical sequences and they are confined to a monophyletic group. However, the two subspecific taxa of Secale cereale do not form a monophyletic group, and the position of Secale sylvestre is uncertain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1055-7903(03)00206-9DOI Listing
March 2004

MADS-box gene evolution-structure and transcription patterns.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2002 Jun;23(3):458-80

Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Gothersgade 140, Denmark.

This study presents a phylogenetic analysis of 198 MADS-box genes based on 420 parsimony-informative characters. The analysis includes only MIKC genes; therefore several genes from gymnosperms and pteridophytes are excluded. The strict consensus tree identifies all major monophyletic groups known from earlier analyses, and all major monophyletic groups are further supported by a common gene structure in exons 1-6 and by conserved C-terminal motifs. Transcription patterns are mapped on the tree to obtain an overview of MIKC gene transcription. Genes that are transcribed only in vegetative organs are located in the basal part of the tree, whereas genes involved in flower development have evolved later. As the universality of the ABC model has recently been questioned, special account is paid to the expression of A-, B-, and C-class genes. Mapping of transcription patterns on the phylogeny shows all three classes of MADS-box genes to be transcribed in the stamens and carpels. Thus the analysis does not support the ABC model as formulated at present.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1055-7903(02)00032-5DOI Listing
June 2002
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