Dr Siew_Yim, Loh, PhD - University of Malaya - Assoc Prof Dr.

Dr Siew_Yim, Loh

PhD

University of Malaya

Assoc Prof Dr.

Kuala Lumpur, WP | Malaysia

Main Specialties: Preventive Medicine, Public Health

Additional Specialties: Cancer survivorship, rehabilitation, Health behaviour, Occupational therapy, Occupational Science, Oncorehabilitation

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-6924-8368

Dr Siew_Yim, Loh, PhD - University of Malaya - Assoc Prof Dr.

Dr Siew_Yim, Loh

PhD

Introduction

Assoc Prof Dr SIEW YIM LOH is a senior lecturer at the Faculty of medicine in University Malaya Kuala Lumpur.
Her area of interest is cancer survivorship., rehabilitation, occupational science, behavioural medicine and public health.


Ref:
UM expert: https://umexpert.um.edu.my/syloh.html
Orchid ID - 0000-0002-6924-8368

Google scholar: https://scholar.google.com.my/citations?hl=en&view_op=list_works&gmla=AJsN-F56hZSCP_D3OnMFBaQXVo0IjlTKpVjsV-e7PJahTnQKwPHxaKTk7QvMjjc-ETp3EZbQn5Eo-gCmlOohK7yN9DC0Pvkphg&user=3jWlNZIAAAAJ

Primary Affiliation: University of Malaya - Kuala Lumpur, WP , Malaysia

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Education

Jul 2018
Cancer prevention Summer fellowship
NIH

Experience

Mar 2004
University of Malaya

Publications

39Publications

897Reads

5Profile Views

50PubMed Central Citations

Functional characterization of two variants in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of transcription factor 4 gene and their association with schizophrenia in sib-pairs from multiplex families.

Asian J Psychiatr 2019 Feb 8;40:76-81. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Department of Mechatronics and Biomedical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras 43000 Kajang, Malaysia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2019.02.001DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Variants in ZNF804A and DTNBP1 assessed for cognitive impairment in schizophrenia using a multiplex family-based approach.

Psychiatry Res 2018 12 7;270:1166-1167. Epub 2018 May 7.

Department of Mechatronics and Biomedical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras 43000 Kajang, Malaysia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2018.04.051DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads
2.470 Impact Factor

A Review of Cancer Awareness in Malaysia – What's Next?

Authors:
Siew Yim Loh

10.23880/OAJCO-16000105

J Cancer Oncology

Background: The burden of cancer is particularly greater in less developed countries where 82 percent of the world's population resides. Greater efforts are needed for cancer awareness. This paper reviewed the campaigns conducted in the last five years in Malaysia, to identify gaps for informing the direction of future campaigns. Method: A two steps review involving searching for published campaigns on the internet, using keywords – cancer campaigns, awareness, and it was limited to June 2012-2017. The follow up step was a searched into the cancer related websites. Results: The search found at least 35 published cancer campaigns – which focus predominantly on breast cancer, mostly conducted as one day event, with no report on outcome measures of effectiveness, and primarily held in peninsular Malaysia. There is an increasing trend to focus on colorectal cancer in recent years. Discussion: Cancer awareness campaigns are sporadic, generic, and dominated by breast cancer. Cancer awareness, cancer detection and cancer prevention campaigns have their roles and are equally needed. Future campaigns with measure of effectiveness should be targeted – i.e. on general awareness (focusing on a knowledge strategy on clear signs and symptoms) or specific cancer survivorship (focusing on prevention - via tobacco control, vaccination for liver and cervical cancers, physical activity, good dietary patterns, and weight-control). Clear, key detection strategy (targeted at general population) and clear preventive strategy (targeted at the rising cancer survivors), are needed and should be pursued relentlessly, to help reduce the rising burden of cancer.

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October 2018
61 Reads

The 'Be Cancer Alert Campaign': protocol to evaluate a mass media campaign to raise awareness about breast and colorectal cancer in Malaysia.

BMC Cancer 2018 Sep 10;18(1):881. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

South East Asia Community Observatory (SEACO), Monash University Malaysia, Bandar Sunway, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-4769-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131834PMC
September 2018
16 Reads
3.362 Impact Factor

Identification of AKT1 3'UTR variants in two Indian schizophrenia patients with poor executive functioning.

Asian J Psychiatr 2018 Aug 22;36:17-18. Epub 2018 May 22.

Department of Mechatronics and Biomedical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras 43000 Kajang, Malaysia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2018.05.025DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Professional Autonomy and Progress of Occupational Therapy - A Case Study on a Neglected Health Profession in Malaysia"

JHHA-105 (2017) DOI: 10.29011/JHHA-105. 100005

Hosp Health Care Admin: JHHA-105. DOI: 10.29011/JHHA-105. 100005

Professional autonomy is positively related to professional involvement, job satisfaction, motivation and meta-cognitive learning processes in developing a profession and its workplace practice. It also affects the general well-being of individual professionals. Increased professional autonomy is associated with increased task variability and better customized patient-centered care. However, health profession in developing countries are often with violated role autonomy, hindering them from securing the full benefits of autonomy for its members, and impacting ability for future growth pathway for the profession. The aim of this paper is to present an analytical perspective of the current issues affecting the autonomy and progress of the Occupational Therapy profession in Malaysia. Three key concerns emerged. These were: - i) low numbers of occupational therapists in Malaysia, ii) low quality and lack of university-based education and iii) low professional autonomy experienced by Malaysian occupational therapists due to the dominance of the medical rehabilitation discipline. These issues affect the advancement of cost-effective, evidence-based, best practice for the consumers of rehabilitation in Malaysia who need occupational therapy clinical services. These issues have reduced the independence and interdisciplinary role of Malaysian occupational therapists in health and social care. Keywords: Autonomy; Challenges; Health System; Medical Dominance; Medical Hegemony; Occupational Therapy; Role Autonomy; Social Care

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December 2017
53 Reads

International Occupational Therapy Research Priorities.

OTJR (Thorofare N J) 2017 04 12;37(2):72-81. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

1 World Federation of Occupational Therapists, Western Australia, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1539449216687528DOI Listing
April 2017
12 Reads

Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Malay Version of the Short Sensory Profile.

Phys Occup Ther Pediatr 2016 1;36(2):117-30. Epub 2015 Sep 1.

d Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine , University of Malaya , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/01942638.2015.1040574DOI Listing
December 2016
16 Reads
1 Citation
1.420 Impact Factor

The perceptions of Australian oncologists about cognitive changes in cancer survivors.

Support Care Cancer 2016 11 20;24(11):4679-87. Epub 2016 Jun 20.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-016-3315-yDOI Listing
November 2016
22 Reads
2.364 Impact Factor

A Predictive Model for Personalized Therapeutic Interventions in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

IEEE J Biomed Health Inform 2016 Jan 4;20(1):424-31. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JBHI.2014.2377517DOI Listing
January 2016
193 Reads

Psychometric properties of the self-report Malay version of the Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQLTM) 4.0 Generic Core Scales among multiethnic Malaysian adolescents.

J Child Health Care 2015 Jun 23;19(2):229-38. Epub 2013 Oct 23.

Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367493513504834DOI Listing
June 2015
21 Reads
0.970 Impact Factor

Chemobrain experienced by breast cancer survivors: a meta-ethnography study investigating research and care implications.

PLoS One 2014 26;9(9):e108002. Epub 2014 Sep 26.

Concord Cancer Centre, Concord Repatriation and General Hospital, Concord, Sydney, Australia; Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0108002PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4178068PMC
June 2015
30 Reads
6 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Reliability and validity of the Nigerian (Hausa) version of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0 index.

Biomed Res Int 2014 7;2014:302097. Epub 2014 Sep 7.

Julius Center, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/302097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4170699PMC
June 2015
8 Reads
1 Citation

The Kuala Lumpur Qigong trial for women in the cancer survivorship phase-efficacy of a three-arm RCT to improve QOL.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(19):8127-34

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia E-mail :

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.19.8127DOI Listing
June 2015
18 Reads
2 Citations
1.500 Impact Factor

Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Return to Work Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals Experience- A Qualitative Inquiry.

J UOEH 2015 Jun;37(2):127-38

Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health (COEH), Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7888/juoeh.37.127DOI Listing
June 2015
13 Reads

Methods to improve rehabilitation of patients following breast cancer surgery: a review of systematic reviews.

Breast Cancer (Dove Med Press) 2015 11;7:81-98. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/BCTT.S47012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4360828PMC
March 2015
20 Reads
5 Citations

Methods to improve rehabilitation of patients following breast cancer surgery: a review of systematic reviews

Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy

Context: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer amongst women but it has the highest survival rates amongst all cancer. Rehabilitation therapy of post-treatment effects from cancer and its treatment is needed to improve functioning and quality of life. This review investigated the range of methods for improving physical, psychosocial, occupational, and social wellbeing in women with breast cancer after receiving breast cancer surgery. Method: A search for articles published in English between the years 2009 and 2014 was carried out using The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. Search terms included: ‘breast cancer’, ‘breast carcinoma’, ‘surgery’, ‘mastectomy’, ‘lumpectomy’, ‘breast conservation’, ‘axillary lymph node dissection’, ‘rehabilitation’, 'therapy’, ‘physiotherapy’, ‘occupational therapy’, ‘psychological’, ‘psychosocial’, ‘psychotherapy’, ‘exercise’, ‘physical activity’, ‘cognitive’, ‘occupational’, ‘alternative’, ‘complementary’, and ‘systematic review’. Study selection: Systematic reviews on the effectiveness of rehabilitation methods in improving post-operative physical, and psychological outcomes for breast cancer were selected. Sixteen articles met all the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Data extraction: Included review year, study aim, total number of participants included, and results. Data synthesis: Evidence for exercise rehabilitation is predominantly in the improvement of shoulder mobility and limb strength. Inconclusive results exist for a range of rehabilitation methods (physical, psycho-education, nutritional, alternative-complementary methods) for addressing the domains of psychosocial, cognitive, and occupational outcomes. Conclusion: There is good evidence for narrowly-focused exercise rehabilitation in improving physical outcome particularly for shoulder mobility and lymphedema. There were inconclusive results for methods to improve psychosocial, cognitive, and occupational outcomes. There were no reviews on broader performance areas and lifestyle factors to enable effective living after treatment. The review suggests that comprehensiveness and effectiveness of post-operative breast cancer rehabilitation should consider patients’ self-management approaches towards lifestyle redesign, and incorporate health promotion aspects, in light of the fact that breast cancer is now taking the form of a chronic illness with longer survivorship years. Keywords: breast cancer surgery, rehabilitation methods, symptom-management, quality of life, lifestyle redesign, self-management 11 March 2015 Volume 2015:7 Pages 81—98 https://doi.org/10.2147/BCTT.S47012

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March 2015
11 Reads

Predictors of poststroke health-related quality of life in Nigerian stroke survivors: a 1-year follow-up study.

Biomed Res Int 2014 28;2014:350281. Epub 2014 May 28.

SEACO/School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia, 146 Jalan Sia Her Yam, Segamat District, 85000 Jahor State, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/350281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4058476PMC
February 2015
18 Reads
4 Citations

Group I Paks as therapeutic targets in NF2-deficient meningioma.

Oncotarget 2015 Feb;6(4):1981-94

Cancer Biology Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4385830PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.2810DOI Listing
February 2015
43 Reads
6.359 Impact Factor

Barriers to participation in a randomized controlled trial of Qigong exercises amongst cancer survivors: lessons learnt.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2012 ;13(12):6337-42

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2012.13.12.6337DOI Listing
October 2014
7 Reads
2 Citations
1.500 Impact Factor

Quality of life of multiethnic adolescents living with a parent with cancer.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2012 ;13(12):6289-94

Institute of Postgraduate Studies, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2012.13.12.6289DOI Listing
October 2014
17 Reads
1 Citation
1.500 Impact Factor

Projection scenarios of body mass index (2013-2030) for Public Health Planning in Quebec.

BMC Public Health 2014 Sep 25;14:996. Epub 2014 Sep 25.

Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, 190 blvd Crémazie Est, Montréal, Québec H2P 1E2, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-996DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4196088PMC
September 2014
55 Reads
2.264 Impact Factor

Women's experiences of cognitive changes or 'chemobrain' following treatment for breast cancer: a role for occupational therapy?

Aust Occup Ther J 2014 Aug 6;61(4):230-40. Epub 2014 Feb 6.

Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1440-1630.12113DOI Listing
August 2014
16 Reads
2 Citations
0.830 Impact Factor

Physical activity and quality of life of cancer survivors: a lack of focus for lifestyle redesign.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2013 ;14(4):2551-5

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2013.14.4.2551DOI Listing
October 2013
9 Reads
2 Citations
1.500 Impact Factor

Effectiveness of a patient self-management programme for breast cancer as a chronic illness: a non-randomised controlled clinical trial.

J Cancer Surviv 2013 Sep 22;7(3):331-42. Epub 2013 Mar 22.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11764-013-0274-xDOI Listing
September 2013
103 Reads
7 Citations
3.303 Impact Factor

Return to work in multi-ethnic breast cancer survivors--a qualitative inquiry.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2012 ;13(11):5791-7

Institute of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2012.13.11.5791DOI Listing
July 2013
9 Reads
5 Citations
1.500 Impact Factor

Quality of life in breast cancer survivors: 2 years post self-management intervention.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2011 ;12(6):1497-501

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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July 2012
7 Reads
1 Citation
1.500 Impact Factor

Barriers to exercise: perspectives from multiethnic cancer survivors in Malaysia.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2011 ;12(6):1483-8

Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, 50630 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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July 2012
9 Reads
1 Citation
1.500 Impact Factor

Physical activity and women with breast cancer: insights from expert patients.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2011 ;12(1):87-94

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Malaysia.

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May 2012
8 Reads
2 Citations
1.500 Impact Factor

Awareness and practice of breast self examination among malaysian women with breast cancer.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2011 ;12(1):199-202

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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May 2012
123 Reads
3 Citations
1.500 Impact Factor

Occupational pressure-targeting organisational factors to ameliorate occupational dysfunction.

J Occup Rehabil 2011 Dec;21(4):493-500

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10926-011-9287-3DOI Listing
December 2011
23 Reads

Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: 2 Years Post Self-management

Asian Pacific J Cancer Prev, 12, 1497-1501

Asian Pacific J Cancer Prevention

Introduction: Today, cancer survivors have an added new role to self manage living with the medical, emotional and role tasks that can affect their quality of life (QOL). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the QOL of women two years after participating in a self-management intervention program. Method: The clinical trial was conducted at University Malaya Medical Centre between 2006 and 2008. The experimental group underwent a 4-week self management program, and the control group underwent usual care. Two years after the intervention, questionnaires were randomly posted out to the participants. Results: A total of 51 questionnaires returned. There were statistically differences between groups in psychological, self-care, mobility and participation aspects in PIPP (p<0.05). The experimental group reported having higher confidence to live with breast cancer compared to control group (p <0.05). There were significant between-group changes in anxiety scores at T2 (immediately after intervention) to T4 (two years later), and the differences in anxiety scores within groups between time point T2 and T4 were significantly different (p<0.05). Conclusion: The SAMA program is potentially capable to serve as a model intervention for successful transition to survivorship following breast cancer treatment. The program needs to be further tested for efficacy in a larger trial involving more diverse populations of women completing breast cancer treatment.

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December 2011
8 Reads

Cancer-behavior-coping in women with breast cancer: Effect of a cancer self-management program.

Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2011 Jul;1(2):84-8

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2229-516X.91150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3657970PMC
July 2011
17 Reads
2 Citations

Structured Walking and Chronic Institutionalized Schizophrenia Inmates: A pilot RCT Study on Quality of Life

Global Journal of Health Science Vol 8 No 1 2016

Global Journal of Health Science

Background: Lifestyle moderate-intensity physical activity can lower the risk of over twenty chronic health conditions, whilst inactivity reduces daily functioning and physical health of individuals living with schizophrenia. This study conducted in 2014 examines the effect of structured walking participation on QOL, psychosocial functioning and symptoms in Hospital Permai, one of the largest psychiatry institution in Asia Method: Chronic patients with schizophrenia (n=104) who met inclusion criteria were randomised to either a 3-month structured walking intervention or a treatment-as-usual arm. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), global functioning (PSP) and QOL (SF-36) were measured at baseline and after the 3-month interval. Results: At 3 month follow-up, there were significant within group differences in QOL (SF-36), psychiatric symptoms (PANSS), and personal and social performance (PSP). There were statistically significant increase in the median SF-36 scores, with increases shown in physical functioning (p<.001), physical role limitations (p<.05), social functioning (p<.01) in the intervention group compared to treatment-as-usual group. Statistically significant reduction of median PANSS score of the intervention group were noted in positive (p<0.001) and negative (p<0.01) symptom, and general psychopathology (p<0.01) scales. Statistically significant increase in the median PSP score (p<0.01) was found in the intervention group compared with the treatment-as-usual group. Between-group differences at post intervention (favouring Intervention) were significant for PANSS positive and SF36 Physical Conclusion: In long stayed chronic inmates, a simple but consistent, organized walking intervention has the potential to bring improvement in functioning, reduction in psychiatric symptoms and quality of Life. The emphasis of rehabilitation should target at lifestyle redesign intervention.

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Self Management Pilot Study on Women with Breast Cancer

Authors:
Siew Yim Loh

Asia Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention Vol 11, 2010, 1293-`1299

Asia Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention

Objective: With increasing survival rates, breast cancer is now considered a chronic condition necessitating innovative care to meet the long-term needs of survivors. This paper presents the findings of a pilot study on self-management for women diagnosed with breast cancer and their implications for Asian health care providers. Methods: A pre-test/ post-test pilot study was conducted to gain preliminary insights into program feasibility and barriers to participation, and to provide justification for a larger trial. Results: The study found the 4 week self management program feasible and acceptable, with a favorable trend in quality of life. The recruitment barriers ranged from competing medical appointments, un-collaborative health providers, linguistic barriers and social-household concerns. Supporting facilitators identified were family, health professionals and fellow participants (“buddies”). Lessons from the study are discussed with regard to Asian health providers. Conclusion: There is preliminary evidence that self management is a workable and potentially useful model even in an Asians entrenched-hierarchical medical model of care. The initial challenge was breaking down barriers in acceptance of a collaborative stance. A clinical trial is now warranted to gather more evidence.

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Top co-authors

Karuthan Chinna
Karuthan Chinna

University of Malaya

5
Lynette Mackenzie
Lynette Mackenzie

University of Newcastle

4
Shing-Yee Lee
Shing-Yee Lee

University Malaya

4
Tin Tin Su
Tin Tin Su

University of Colorado

4
Kia Fatt Quek
Kia Fatt Quek

University Malaya Medical Center

3
Pek Yee Tang
Pek Yee Tang

Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR)

3
Hoi Sen Yong
Hoi Sen Yong

Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital

3
Shiau Foon Tee
Shiau Foon Tee

Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman

3